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)CS 



THE ART 



OF 



KNITTING. 



PRICE : 
FIFTY CENTS or TWO SHILLINGS. 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Butterick Publishing Co. (Limited), 

London, and New York, 

1892. 



"A thing accomplished has a beginning." — Italian Proverb. 



"To climb steep hills 

" Requires slow pace at first." — Shakespeare. 



u # * * a i e );t er or a book distracts a woman more than four pair of 
stockings knit by herself." — Richter. 



INTRODUCTION. 



IN presenting our patrons this book upon The Art of Knitting, in 
response to their continuous demand for such a work, we take especial 
pride in announcing that it is the most complete of its kind, and the 
only one devoted wholly to the occupation or pastime of Knitting ever 
published. As it is intended for a companion-pamphlet to our publication 
upon The Art of Crocheting, it has been prepared upon the same basis — 
that is, the very first rudiments of the work are carefully described and 
illustrated, so that the amateur may acquire correctness and celerity in 
personally beginning and developing the art of Knitting, and with little 
difficulty soon keep pace with an expert in the work. 

The secret of the success of any undertaking is— first, complete mastery 
of details from the very first preliminaries ; second, sufficient perseverance 
to grasp and conquer difficulties through a knowledge of detail, thus 
bringing harmonious results from puzzling or complicated conditions. 

The same foundation of success is incorporated in the Art of Knitting. 
We give you the first principles and many designs from the simple to the 
intricate, each accompanied by correct instructions whose signs and symbols 
are fully explained at the beginning of the collection. Given these, the 
persevering knitter can, with little difficulty, develop in a perfect manner 
every article described or suggested in The Art of Knitting. But 
"patience" must be "a virtue" belonging to every knitter, whether it be a 
gift of nature or a matter of cultivation and discipline. 

We have endeavored to present the best of everything in the way of 
designs, and have spared neither time nor expense, nor the virtue we recom- 
mend, in selecting and properly preparing the collection, and feel, therefore, 
a justifiable gratification in the result — a sentiment the purchasers of The 
Art of Knitting cannot but experience, once they are in possession of the 
book and begin to follow its instructions. 

THE BUTTERICK PUBLISHING CO. [Limited], 

7, 9 and ii West 13TH Street, New York. 



(ONTeNT$. 



Pages 7 to 10 — 

General Directions for Knitting. 

Pages iq to 18 — 

Fancy Stitches and Designs in Knitting. 

Pages 1 8 to . 24 — 

Designs for Fancy Stripes, Tops to Mittens and Socks, Borders, Scarfs, Shawls, 
Etc., Etc. 

Pages 24 to 51 — 

Knitted Edgings and Insertions. 

Pages 51 to 57 — 

General Rules for Knitting Mittens, Socks and Stockings. 

Pages 57 to 58— 

How to Wash Silk Knitted Articles. 
How to Wash Wool Knitted Articles. 

Pages 58 to 59— 

Calculation in Knitting and Table for Same. 

Pages 59 to 81 — 

Hoods, Capes, Shawls, Jackets, Fascinators, Petticoats, Leggings, Slippers, Etc., Etc. 

Pages 8 1 to 84 — 

Directions . for Knitting Various Articles and Garments, for which no Illus- 
trations are Given. 

Pages 84 to 92 — 

" Sweaters," Belts, Scarfs, Ties, Hunting Caps, Suspenders, Etc., for Gentlemen. 

Pages 92 to 108 — 

Counterpanes, Spreads, Borders, Doilies, Mats, Etc. 

Pages 108 to in — 
Rugs. 

Pages in to 138 — 

Useful Articles for Children's Wear. 

Pages 138 to 143 — 

Dolls, Reins, Balls, Etc., for Children. 

Pages 143 to 154— 
Miscellany. 




GRANDMOTHER S SCHOLAR. 



l?e fip\ of WtiW 



ABBREVIATIONS USED IN KNITTING. 



k. — Knit plain. 

p. — Purl, or as is often called, seam. 

pi. — Plain knitting. 

n. — Narrow. 

k 2 to.— Knit 2 together. Same as n. 

th o or o. — Throw the thread over the needle. 

Make one. — Make a stitch thus : Throw the thread in front of the 
needle and knit the next stitch in the ordinary manner. (In the next 
row or round this throw-over, or put-over as it is frequently called, is 
used as a stitch.) Or, knit one and purl one out of a stitch. 

To Knit Crossed.— Insert needle in the hack of the stitch and knit as 
usual. 



si. — Slip a stitch from the left needle to the right needle without 
knitting it. 

si. and b. — Slip and bind. Slip one stitch, knit the next; pass the 
slipped stitch over the knit stitch as in binding off work. 

To Bind or Cast off. — Either slip or knit the first stitch ; knit the next ; 
pass the first or slipped stitch over the second, and repeat as far as 
directed. 

Row.— Knitting once across the work when but two needles are used. 

Round. — Knitting once around the work when four or more needles 
are used, as in a sock or stocking. 

Repeat. — This means to work designated rows, rounds or portions of 
work as many times as designated. 



Stars or asterisks mean, as mentioned wherever they occur, that the details given between them are to 
be repeated as many times as directed before going on with those details which follow the next star. 
As an example: * K 2, p I, th o, and repeat twice more from * (or last #) means that you are to knit 
as follows: k 2, p I, th o; k 2, p I, th o; k 2, p I, th o, thus repeating the k 2, p I, th o, twice after knit- 
ting it the first time, making it three times In all before proceeding with the next part of the direction. 



GGNGF^AL Dl^e(TlON$ FOI^ ^NlTTlNG. 



Most amateur knitters, and many experts, con- 
fess to an inability to follow the instructions and 




No. 1. 




No. 2. 



so has knitting. The foundation, materials in 

hand, is, " casting on stitches," for which we give 

several methods, as follows: 

Of the two or three methods of 
casting on stitches, the one best 
adapted to garments or articles where 
an elastic edge is desired, is developed 
with a single thread or yarn and two 
needles. It is conducted as follows: 

First Method. 

Make a loop in the yarn or thread 
and slip it onto a needle. (See No. i.) 



knitting designs published in 
various books and periodicals 
for their benefit. This is the 
result of a lack of perseverance 
on the part of the knitter, and 
is also often due to the dif- 
ferent abbreviations used by 
different publishers of such 
work. A mastery of any set of 
abbreviations will overcome the 
main difficulty; then, if the 
instructions are correct, the de- 
velopment of the design will be 
comparatively easy. We therefore urge those who 
purchase this manual, to become familiar with the ab- 
breviations given above before beginning any of the 
designs presented on the following pages; for much 
time has been spent to render them plain and cor- 
rectly adapt them to the accompanying instructions. 

Casting On Stitches. 
As every other task or pleasure has a beginning, 





. 3. No. 4. 

— Details for Casting on Stitches with Two Needles. 

Next slip the second needle into the loop, (see 
No. 2.) throw the yarn around it, draw it through 
(see No. 3.) and slip the loop thus formed onto the 
left-hand needle, thrusting the latter needle through 
it from the front to the back. Put the right-hand 
needle into the second loop (see No. 4,) make 
another loop as at No. 3, and slip it onto the left- 
hand needle. Repeat in this manner until you 
have as many stitches as required. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Second Method. (With One Needle.) 

Hold the end of the yarn under the third 
and fourth fingers of the left-hand. With the 
right (which also holds the needle) bring the 
yarn from under the left thumb up over it and 
also over the first finger of the left hand, 
then downward under the finger and up over 
the thumb; (see No. 5). Then pass the point 
of the needle under the crossing up back of that 

portion of the 
yarn that is 
brought down 
from the first 
finger (see No. 
6), draw it for- 
ward toward 
the left, grasp 
the crossing 
with the 
thumb and fin- 
ger (see No. 
7), throw the 

No. 5. 




Plain Knitting. 

Having cast on the requisite number of stitches, 
thrust the right-hand needle into the first stitch ; 
throw the thread around its point, draw it through 
to form a loop or stitch; repeat this movement for 
the next and all the stitches on the left-hand needle. 
In knitting a sock or stocking repeat along each 
needle in regular order, round and round. 



Fancy Knitting. 

This is done according to special instructions 
given stitch by stitch, but the details include 
only foundation principles, such as knitting plain, 
seaming or purling, widening, narrowing, etc., etc. 



Seaming or Purling. 

" Seam " and " purl " are different names for the 
same movement. Every knitter knows how to 



yarn over the needle with the right 
hand (which holds the yarn as in 
regular knitting) draw a loop through, 
slip the yarn off the left first finger and 
draw it down to knot the loop or stitch 
on the needle. Then arrange the yarn 
over the left hand again and make 
another loop or stitch in the same way. 
Repeat until you have the required 
number of stitches on the needle. 

Third Method. 

Same as second except that the yarn 
which passes over the left hand is 





Nos. 



No. 6. No. 7. 

5, 6 and 1. — Details for Casting on Stitches with One Needle. 





No. 8. No. 9. 

Nos. 8 and 9. — Method of Seaming or "Purling. 



doubled, the end being held, with the yarn 
itself, to begin the casting, the same as in the 
beginning of the Second Method. The yarn is 
held single in the right hand and unwinds from 
the ball. The length of the doubled portion must, 
necessarily be a matter of guess-work, depending 
upon the size of the article to be knit. The doub- 
led thread or yarn makes a very firm edge for 
stockings and socks, or any garments that are 
to be subjected to continuous service. 



"seam a stitch." To purl a stitch 
means exactly the same thing. 
For those who are not proficient 
in knitting as yet, we explain as fol- 
lows: To "seam" or "purl," throw 
the thread from its usual position at 
the back of the work in front of the 
right-hand needle (see No. 8); then 
insert the point of the latter under 
the next stitch thrusting it through 
from the right toward the left instead 
of the way usual in knitting plain; this 
will bring the right-hand needle in front 
of the left one instead of back of it as in plain 
knitting ; now throw the thread around the 
right-hand needle by the same movement as 
the one used in plain knitting (see No. 9), 
and draw the loop backward instead of for- 
ward. Seam or purl as many stitches as re- 
quired, and then throw the yarn back of the 
needle into its ordinary position. The front of 
the work is the side next to the knitter ; 
the back, the side away from her. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Methods of Widening or Increasing. 

Widening by throwing the thread in front of 
the needle between stitches makes a tiny opening 
that is objectionable, except in fancy patterns. In 
plain knitting it is best to widen by knitting a plain 
and a purled stitch out of the same loop without 
slipping the loop until both are made; or, by knit- 
ting one out of the front and one out of the back 
of the same loop or stitch in the same manner; or, 
by taking up and knitting, as a stitch, the bar of 
thread between the two needles. Where two 
stitches are to be made by throwing the thread, it 
must pass in front of the needle, over it and to 
the front again. The general direction for this is, 
" thread over twice." In working back, to com- 
plete the two new stitches knit the first throw-over 
like an ordinary stitch, but in knitting the second 
you must put the needle into the back loop of the 
stitch instead of the front. In widening or increas- 
ing three stitches, the same plan must be observed, 
by knitting from the back of the second and third 
throw-overs. In increasing by throwing the thread, 
the following is another method : Pass the right 
needle through a loop in the ordinary manner, 
throw the thread twice around it and draw the two 
throw-overs through together as if they were one. 
This is practically the same as throwing the thread 
over the needle twice between stitches, and the 
throw-overs are knit off in the same manner. 

To Widen When Purling. 

The thread, being already in front of the needle, 
must be wound once entirely around it. 

Methods of Narrowing or Decreasing. 

The most generally used method of narrowing is 
to "knit two together." To do this slip the point 
of the right-hand needle in the ordinary manner 
under two stitches at once, and then throw the 
thread over and draw the loop through both as if 
they were one. This method may also be used by 
putting the needle through the back of two stitches 
instead of through the front; this will make them 
lie more flatly than by the other method and will 
form a regular chain. Another method is to slip 
one, knit one, and pass the slipped stitch over the 
knitted one. This narrows by one stitch. To narrow 
two stitches: Slip one, knit two together and pass the 
slipped stitch over the two knitted stitches. Three 
stitches may be narrowed upon the same principle. 

To Narrow When Purling. 

Purl two together ; or, purl one, put it back on 
the left-hand needle and then draw the next stitch 
beyond over it, drop the drawn stitch off the 
needle, and then slip the first stitch back on the 
right needle. Or, two stitches may be purled 
from the back, by throwing the thread forward 
in the usual way and taking up the two stitches 
by slipping the point of the right needle under 
them from the left side toward the right, and 
bringing the right-hand needle over the left one 
in the usual way. 



Edge Stitches. 

The stitch at each end of a row in knit- 
ting is called the edge stitch. It is generally 
disposed of so as to keep the edge straight or 
even, but is not spoken of as an edge stitch in 
instructions. 

The First Stitch. 

Always slip the first stitch in knitting and knit 
the last, unless special instructions for disposing of 
them are given. This will make a more even edge. 
A chain-edge for stripes is formed by slipping the 
first and purling the last stitch. 

Stitches Unintentionally Dropped. 

Either ravel your work back to the dropped stitch 
and then restore it and the others to the needle, or, 
if it has slipped down for a number of rows, take a 
crochet hook and carefully chain it up through al) 
the lines until the needle is reached. 

To Fasten Two Threads Together. 

Lap the ends of the threads for a short distance 
and knit a few stitches with both at the same time. 
This will prevent a knot and make the work firm 
and smooth. 

To Join or Bind Together. 

Knit as far across the row as directed — generally 
to the middle. Then fold the work so as to bring 
the two needles side by side. Take an extra needle, 
put it through the first or end stitch on the needle 
next to you, then through the corresponding stitch 
on the other needle; knit the two together. as one 
stitch. Knit in this way across the two needles, 
break off the yarn and fasten. 

Double Knitting. 

The two sides of double knitting look alike 
and can be lifted apart. The work is done as 
follows : Cast on an even number of stitches. 
Bring the thread in front, slip one stitch insert- 
ing the needle as if for purling, put the thread 
back and knit one stitch. Repeat to the end 
of the row. The second row is like the first, 
except that you knit the slipped stitches and 
slip the knitted ones. 

Rib Knitting. 

This is made by purling and knitting alternately 
a like number of stitches. The most general rib 
is made by knitting two and purling two, across or 
around the work. When the ribbing is done on two 
needles, in working every other time across, the 
stitches that were knitted must be purled, and those 
that were purled must be knitted. 

Patent Knitting. 

This method is frequently used in knitting child- 
ren's underwear. It is worked as follows: * Throw 
the wool forward, slip one, knit two together, and 
repeat from * across or around the work. In knit- 
ting on two needles, work back in the same way. 



10 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



fan(V 5TiT(;He$ anQ Dg<;ign$ in Knitting. 



Knotted Stitch. 
No. i. — Cast on any number of stitches required. 



k 3 and repeat 




No. 1. — Knotted Stitch. 

First row. — Th o twice, 
k i, and repeat across the 
row. 

Second row. — * K i; 
out of the two put-overs 
(th o twice) p i, k i. 
Now pass the ist and 
2nd stitches on the left 
hand needle over the 3rd; 
then repeat these details 
from the *, and continue 
repeating in this way to 
lhe end of the row. 
These two rows com- 
plete the pattern. 

Design for Knitting 

Shawls, Fascinators, 

Clouds, Etc. 

No. 2. — Cast on an 
even number of stitches 
and knit across plain, 
using No. 4 or 6 needles. 

First row. — Knit plain. 

Second row. — Slip 1, k 1, * wool in front of the 
needle, insert needle under 3 stitches and knit as 
1 ; repeat from * to the end of the row, and knit 
the last stitch. 

Third row. — Knit 2, * knit 1 out of the put-over 
thread, purl 1, knit 1, and repeat from *. 

Fotirth, Fifth and Sixth rows. — Knit plain. 

Repeat from 2nd row for all the work. 

Cane-Work Design. 

No. 3. — Use four needles. (The design may 
also be knitted on two needles by making 1 stitch 
in every 4th purled row to take the place of the 
last put-over in the preceding row). 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by 4. 




No. 2. — Design for Knitting Shawls, Fascinators, 
Clouds, etc. 



Third row. 
— Knit 2 ; * 
where the 
thread was put 
over in last 
row, knit 1 
stitch plain, 
and seam 1 ; 
then knit 1, 
*; repeat from 
star to star to 
end of row. 

Fourth row. 
—Plain. 

Fifth and 
2nd row. 



First row. — Th o, k 1, th 0, 
across the row. 

Second, Fourth, Sixth, Eighth and Tenth rows.- — 
Purl. 

Third ro7v. — * K 3, th o, si 1, k 2 together, 
pass the slipped stitch over, th o and repeat from 

* (or beginning of the row) across the work. 
Fifth row. — * Th o, si 1, k 2 together, pass 

slipped stitch over, th o, k 3 and repeat from 

* across the work. 

Seventh row. — Same as third. 
Ninth row. — Same as fifth. 
Tenth row. — Purl as directed and then re- 
peat fr6m third row for the next section of the 
work. 

This is a favorite design for the fronts of 
stockings and is generally made about three 
inches wide, and may ex- 
tend from the toe as high 
as desired. 



Design in Knitting. 

(No Illustration.) 

This stitch is suitable 
for clouds, shawls, etc. 
Split zephyr wool and 
No. 4 or 6 needles are 
used in knitting the de- 
sign. Bone or wooden 
needles may be used if 
the work is desired very 
open. Cast on an even 
number of stitches, and 
knit a plain row. 

First row. — Knit plain. 

Second row. — Slip 1, 
knit 1, * th o, knit 3 
together, * ; repeat from 
star to star to the end 
of the row; knit last 
stitch plain. 




No. 3. — Cane-Work Design. 



Sixth rows. — Plain; repeat from 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



11 



Fancy Knitted Stripe 
No. 4. — Two or 




No. 4. — Fancy Knitted Stripe. 



four needles may be used for 
this design. 
In working 
with two 
needles, purl 
instead of 
knitting plain 
in the alter- 
nate rows. 
The design 
is complete 
in 8 rows or 
rounds. Cast 
on any num- 
ber of stitch- 
es divisible 
by 9 and work 
as follows : 



First round. — K 3, n, 
th o, k 4 and repeat. 

Second, Fourth, Sixth 
and Eighth rounds. — 
Knit plain.. 

Third round. — K 2, n, 
th o, n, th o, k 3 and 
repeat. 

Fifth round. — K 1, n, 
th o, h, th o, n, th o, k 2 
and -repeat. 

Seventh round. — N, th 
o, n, th o, n, th o, n, th o, 
k 1 and repeat. 

Knit 8th row as di- 
rected and repeat from 
beginning. 

Knitted Design for 

Shawls, Stripes, 
Spreads, Afghans, Etc. 




Next row. — K 1, th o 3 times and repeat across 
the row. 

Next row. — Slip 1, drop the put-overs and repeat 
5 times more, as before. Then pass the 6 stitches 
onto the left-hand needle, and pass the last three 
over the first 3, and then knit as before. Repeat 
across the row. 

Next two rows. — Plain. 

Then repeat from * for all the work. 

Narrow Fancy Stripe in Knitting. 

No. 6. — This design may be made on two needles 
instead of four if preferred, except that in this 
case the alternate rows must be purled instead of 
knitted. Cast on any number of stitches divisible 
by 4. Four rows or rounds complete the pattern. 
First round. — K 1, n, th o, k 1, and repeat. 
Second and Fourth rounds. — Plain. 
Third round. — N, th o, k 2 and repeat. 

Repeat these four 
rounds to any depth 
desired. 



Fancy-Stripe Design. 



No. 5, 
number 



— Cast on 
of stitches 



any 
di- 



No. 5.— Knitted Design for Shawls, Stripes, Spreads, 
Afghans, Ktc. 



No. 7. — Use four steel 
needles. Cast on any 
number of stitches di- 
visible by 10. 

First round. — P 3, k 1, 
th o, si and b, k 4, and 
repeat from beginning of 
round. 

Second round. — P 3, k 
2, th o, si and b, k 3, and 
repeat from beginning of 
round. 

Third round. — Purl 3, 
k 3, th o, si and b, k 2 
and repeat. 

Fourth round. — Purl 3, 
k 4, th o, si and b, k 1 
and repeat. 

Fifth round. — P 3, k 5, 



visible by 6 and knit 
across plain. 

Next row. — * K 1, 
th o 3 times and re- 
peat across the row. 
Next roiu. — Slip 1, 
drop the put-overs 
and repeat 5 times 
more until there are 
6 stitches on the 
right-hand needle. 
Now pass the first 3 
stitches slipped over 
the last 3, being careful not to twist them in 
crossing. Then pass them onto the left-hand 
needle and knit off. Repeat in this way across 
the work. 

Next tivo rows. — Plain. 




No. 6.- 



■ Narrow Fancy Stripe 
in Knitting. 



th o, si and 
b and re- 
peat. Then 
repeat from 
first round 
for all the 
work. 

This will 
be found a 
very pretty 
pattern for 
the fronts 
of stock- 
ings or the 
backs of 
mittens, and 

may be continued as far as individual taste may dic- 
tate. It is also pretty for the tops of infant's socks. 




No. 1. — Fancy-Stripe Design. 



12 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Fancy Design in Knitting. 



No. 8. — Use four needles. 




No. 8. — Fancy Design in 
Knitting. 



th o, 



Cast on any num- 
ber of stitches di- 
visible by four. 
Twelve rounds 
complete the design. 

First r ound . — 
Knit 2, n, th o and 
repeat around the 
work. 

Second and every 
alternate round, in- 
cluding the Twelfth. 
— Knit plain. 

Third round. — 
K i, n, th o, k i 
and repeat around 
the work. 

Fifth r oun d. — 
Narrow, th o, k 2 
and repeat, 
slip and bind and re- 




No. 9. — Fancy Design in Knitting. 



Seventh round. — K 2, 
peat to end of round. 

Knit the eighth round as directed, (plain), and 
then pass the first stitch on 
each needle to the next 
needle; this will leave one 
stitch on the 3rd needle 
which is considered a part 
of the 8th round in addition 
to its other stitches, and is 
knitted as such before the 
next round is begun. 

Ninth round. — K 2, th o, 
slip and bind and repeat to 
end of round. 

Eleventh round. — N, th o, 
k 2 and repeat. In the 12th 
round knit all but the last 
stitch; then pass the last 

stitch on each needle to the next needle. For 
the next division of the pattern, repeat from the 
5th to the 12th rounds inclusive, also making the 
transfers of the stitches as directed for the first 
division. 

Fancy Design in Knitting. 

No. 9. — Use four needles. Cast on any number 
of stitches divisible by 6, and knit 16 rounds for 
each section of the pattern. 

First round. — N, th o and repeat. 

Second, Third and Fourth rounds. — Plain. 

Fifth round. — K 3, n, th o, k 1 and repeat. 

Sixth round. — K 2, n, th o, k 2 and repeat. 

Seventh round. — K 1, n, th o, k 3 and repeat. 

Eighth round. — N, th o, k 4 and repeat. 

Ninth round. — K 2, th o, slip and bind, k 2 and 
repeat. 

Tenth round. — K 3, th o, slip and bind, k 1 and 
repeat. 

Eleventh round. — K 4, th o, slip and bind and 
repeat. 



Twelfth, Thirteenth and Fourteenth rounds. — r 
Plain. 

Fifteenth round. — N, th o and repeat. 

Sixteenth round. — Plain. Then repeat the 3 
plain rounds and all of the directions. 

Knob-Stitch Design. 

No. 10. — Cast on any number of stitches divisible 
by 4, with 2 added for edge stitches. 

First row. — K 1, * make 3 stitches out of the 
next stitch, by purling 1, knitting 1, and purling 1, 
all out of it. (Do not slip the stitch off until the 
last purling is made). Then k 3 together and 
repeat from *, knitting the last stitch. 

Second row. — Plain. 

Third row. — K 1, * k 3 together. Make 3 out 
of the next stitch as in first row; and repeat from 
* across the row knitting the last stitch plain. 

Fourth ' row. — Plain. 

These four rows form the design. Repeat until 
the work is of the required dimensions. 

Shell Design in Knitting. 
No. 11. — Use four needles. Cast on any number 




No. 10.— Knob-Stitch Design. 



of stitches divisible by 8. The design is complete 
in 7 rounds. 

First round. — Slip and bind, k 6, th o and 
repeat. 

Second round. 
— Slip and bind, 
k 5, th o, k 1 
and repeat. 

Third round. 
— SI and b, k 4, 
th o, k 2 and 
repeat. 

Fourth round. 
— SI and b, k 3, 
th o, k 3 and 
repeat. 

Fifth round. 
— SI and b, k 2, 
th o, k 4 and 
repeat. 

Sixth round. — SI and b, k 1, th o, k 5 and repeat. 

Seventh round. — SI and b, th o, k 6 and repeat. 

Repeat from first round. 




No. 11. — Shell Design in Knitting. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Fancy Shell-Stripe in Knitting. 

No. 12. — Use four needles. Cast on any number 
of stitches divisible by 14. The design is com- 
plete in 14 
rounds. 

First 
round, — K 
7, th o, k 5, 
n, and re- 
peat. 

Second 
and Ninth 
rounds. — 
Plain. 

Third 
round. — SI 
and b, k 5, 
th o, k 1, 
th o, k 4, 
n,. and re 
peat, 
k 4, th o, k 3, th o, k 3, 




No. 12. — Fancy Shell-Stripe in Knitting. 



Fourth round. — SI and b 
n, and repeat. 

Fifth round. — SI and b, k 3, th o, k 5, th o, k 2 
n, and repeat. 

Sixth round.* — SI and b, k 2, th 
o, k 7, th o, k 1, n, and repeat. 

Seventh round. — SI and b,k 1, 
th o, k 9, th o, n, and repeat. 

Eighth round. — SI and b, k5, 
th o, k 7 and repeat. 

Tenth round. — SI and b, k 4, th 
o, k 1, th o, k 5, n, and repeat. 

Eleventh round. — SI and b, k 
3, th o, k 3, th o, k 4, n, and 
repeat. 

Twelfth round. — SI and b, k 2, 
th o, k 5, th o, k 3, n, and repeat. 

Thirteenth round. — SI and 
b, k 1, th o, k 7, th o, k 

Fourteenth round. — SI and b, 
n, and repeat. 

Repeat from first round for remainder of pattern. 



Fancy Design in Knitting. 

No. 14. — Four needles are necessary in knitting 
this design, which is complete in 14 rounds. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible- by 6. 

First round. — Narrow, th o and repeat around the 
work. 

Second, Third and Fourth rounds. — Plain. 

Fifth round. — K 4, n, th o and repeat. 

Sixth round. — K 3, n, th o, k 1 and repeat. 

Seventh round. — K 2, n, th o, k 2 and repeat. 

Eighth round. — K 1, n, th o, k 3 and repeat. 

Ninth round. — N, th o, k 4 and repeat. 

Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth rounds. — Plain. 

Thirteenth round. — N, th o and repeat. 

Fourteenth round. — Plain; repeat from the 3rd 
round for rest of work. 

Shell Design in Knitting. 

No. 15. — Use four needles and cast on any num- 
ber of stitches divisible by 9. The design is com- 
plete in 12 rounds. 

First round. — Slip and bind, k 5, th o, k 1, th o, 
k 1 and repeat. 

Second, Fourth, Sixth, Eighth, Tenth and Twelfth 




No. 13. — Herring-bone Design. 



•■ ■ ■- . ; - •■■;■•■::-•■•:, 

-'.■;■ '/■■■'■■'■•■ ■"• ■■'■''■ ',''■" 



No. 14. — Fa.rty Design in Knitting. 



2, n and repeat, 
th o, k 9, th o, k 1, 



Herring-Bone Design. 

No. 13. — Cast on any number of stitches divisi- 
ble by 3. 

First row. — K 1, k 2 together, th o, and repeat 
across the row, ending with k 2. 

Second row. — P 1, p 2 together, th o, and repeat, 
ending the row with p 2. 

Repeat these two rows for all the work. 

Herring-Bone Design (No. 2). 

(No Illustration.) 

Cast on an uneven number of stitches. 

First row. — K 1, * th o, k 2 together, and repeat 
from * across the row. 

Second row. — Same as first. 

This makes a very open effect, such as is seen in 
knitted laces. 



rounds. — Slip and bind, k 8 and repeat. In each 
of these rounds there will be 10 stitches on 
each needle instead 
of 9. 

Third round. — 
Slip and bind, k 4, 
th o, k 1, th o, k 2 
and repeat. 

Fifth round. — 
Slip and bind, k 3, 
th o, k 1, th o, k 3 
and repeat. 

Seventh round. — 
Slip and bind, k 2, 
th 0, k 1, th o, k 4 
and repeat. 

Ninth round. — 
Slip and bind, k 1, 
th o, k 1, th o, k 5 and repeat across the 

Eleventh round. — Slip and bind, th o, k 1. 
k 6 and repeat. 

Knit 1 2th round as directed and repeat from be- 
ginning of these details for all of the pattern 
making it as deep as desired, 




No. 15.- 



-Shell Design in 
Knitting. 



row. 
th o, 



14 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




Knot-Stitch Design. 



Knot-Stitch Design. 

No. 16. — This stitch looks best in heavy wool 
and is suitable for afghans, spreads, cushion-covers, 

etc., etc. 
Use two steel 
needles. Cast 
on any num- 
ber of stitch- 
es required. 

First row. 
— Throw the 
wool o^er the 
needle twice, 
k i, and re- 
peat across 
the row. 

Second 
row. — K the 
first stitch; 
then out of 
the t av o 
throw- overs, 
purl one, k 
the other; 
then pass the 
ist and 2nd 
stitches on 
the right- 
hand needle over the 3rd; repeat from beginning 
across the row. 

Repeat these two rows for all of the work. 

Fancy Pattern in Knitting. 

No. 17. — To be knitted with four needles. Cast 
on any number of stitches divisible by 6. The 
design is complete in 8 rounds. 

First round. — Knit 1, n, th o, k 3 and repeat. 

Second, Fourth, Sixth and Eighth rounds. 
— Knit plain. 

Third round. — N, th o, k 1, th o, slip and 
bind, k 1 and repeat. 

After knitting the fourth round pass the 
first stitch on each needle onto the next 
needle; this will leave 1 stitch on the 3rd 
needle which is considered as a part of the 
4th round and is knit as such before the 
fifth round is begun. 

Fifth round. — Th o, k 3, th o, slip 1, 
n, pass slipped stitch over and repeat. 

Seventh round. — Th o, k 4, n, and repeat. 

Eighth round. — Plain, as directed, and 
repeat from ist round for rest of work. 

Design for Fancy Knitting. 

No. 18. — Cast on any number of stitches 
divisible by 6. The design is complete in 20 
rows or rounds which are knit as follows: 

First round. — K 1, n, th o, k 3 and repeat. 

Second and every alternate round including the 
Twentieth. — Plain. 

Third round. — N, th o, k 1, th o, slip and bind, 
k 1 and repeat. 

Fifth round. — K 1, n, th o, k 3 and repeat. 



Seventh round. — N, th o, k 1, th o, slip and bind, 
k 1 and repeat. 

Knit the eighth round plain (as directed) then 
pass the first stitch on each needle to the next 
needle. This will leave 1 stitch on the 3rd 
needle which is considered a part of the 8th 
round and is knitted as such before beginning 
the 9th round. 

Ninth round. — Th o, k 3, th o, si 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over and repeat. 

Eleventh round. — Th o, slip and bind, k 1, n, 
th o, k 1 and repeat. 

Thirteenth round. — 
K 1, th o, si 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, th 
o, k 2 and repeat. 

Fifteenth round. — 
K 1, n, th o, k 3 and 
repeat. , 

Seventeenth round. — 
N, th o, k 1, th o, si 
and bind, k 1 and re- 
peat. 

Nineteenth round. — 
K 1, n, th o, k 3 and 
repeat. 

In repeating the 
pattern, knit 2 plain 
rounds, then begin 
with the first round for the next row of holes. 




No. 18. — Design for Fancy 
Knitting. 



Design for Knitted Border. 

No. 19. — To make this border in Shetland wool 
requires one thick wooden knitting-needle and 
two fine steel ones. With the latter, three rows 
are knitted backward and forward, and then one 
row with the wooden needle. By drawing up the 




No. 17.- 



-Fanct Pattern in 
Knitting. 



No. 19. 



-Design for Knitted 
Border. 



side stitches, the edge scollops are made, in 
which, if desired, a few open scollop rows can be 
crocheted or netted. In this example of the de- 
sign, which may be widened at pleasure, sixteen 
stitches are to be cast on. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



15 



Open-Work Design. 

No. 20. — Two or four needles may be used for 
this design. If made on two needles knit the 

second and every 
alternate following 
row. 

Cast on any 
number of stitches 
divisible by 4, 
using four needles. 
First round. — * 
Make 1, k 1, make 
1, k 3 and repeat 
across the 




20. — Open-Work Design. 



from 
work. 

Second round. — 
Purl. 

Third roicnd. — * 
K 3, make 1, si 1, 
k 2 together, pass 
slipped stitch over, 
make 1 and repeat 
from * across the 
work. At the end of 
this row, (when using two needles) in making the 
stitch, pick it up from the preceding row, after the 
method explained for making stitches, on page 9. 
Fifth round. — * Make 1, si 1, k 2 together, pass 
slipped stitch over, make 1, k 3 and repeat from * 
for the whole round. 

Seventh round. — Like third round. 
Ninth round. — Like fifth round. 
Tenth round. — Purl, as directed, and then repeat 
from third round. 

Diamond Stripe. 

No. 21. — Cast on any number of stitches divisi- 
ble by 14. 

First row. — K 1, th o, k 2 together at the back, 
th o, k 2 together at the back, 
k 5, k 2 together, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, th o and repeat from 
beginning, ending with make 1 
instead of th o. 

Second and every alternate 
row. — Purl. 

Third row. — * K 2, th o, k 2 
together at the back, th o, k 2 
together at the back, k 3, k 2 
together, th o, k 2 together, th 
o, k 1 and repeat from *. 

Fifth row. — * K 3, th o, k 2 
together at the back, th o, k 2 
together at the back, k 1, k 2 
together, th o, k 2 together, th 
o, k 2, and repeat from *. 

Seventh row. — K 4, th o, k 2 
together at the back, th o, k 3 together, th o, k 2 
together, th o, k 3 and repeat as before. 

Ninth row. — K 3, k 2 together, th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 1, th o, k 2 together at the back, th o, k 2 
together at the back, k 2 and repeat. 

Eleventh row. — K 2, k 2 together, th o, k 2 to- 



gether, th o, k 3, th o, k 2 together at the back, th o, 
k 2 together at the back, k 1 and repeat. 

Thirteenth row. — K 1, k 2 together, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, th o, k 5, th o, k 2 together at the back, 
th o, k 2 together at the back and repeat. 

Fifteenth row. — K 2 together, * th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 7, th o, k 2 together at the back, th o, k 3 togeth- 
er and repeat from *. At 
the end of the last repe- 
tition in this row there 
will be only 1 stitch to 
knit instead of 3 together. 

Purl the sixteenth row. 
Then repeat from the 
first row, but at the end 
of this row, there will be 
an extra stitch which you 
knit instead of making 1. 

Peacock's Tail Pat- 
tern. 







'Klii 


^PSi 


illl 


«to&X5«$J 




!v§8&r*?ira 


$&& 







No. 22. — Peacock's Tail 
Pattern. 



No. 22. — Cast on any 
number of stitches divis- 
ible by 9, with 4 added for 
the edge stitches. The 
edges, which are in plain knitting on the right side 
of the work, are not mentioned after the first row. 
In knitting these stitches, knit them on the right 
side of the work and purl them on the wrong side. 

First row. — K 2 (for edge) k 2, * th o, k 1 ; re- 
peat 4 times more from *; th o, k 2. Repeat from 
beginning, ending with knit 2. 

Second row. — * P 2, k n, p 2 and repeat from * 
across the row. 

Third row. — * N, k n, n, and repeat from * 
across the row. 

Fourth row. — P 2 together, p 9, p 2 together and 
repeat. 

Fifth row. — N, k 7, n, and repeat. 

Sixth row. — Purl, 




No. 21. — Diamond Stripe. 



Now repeat 
the work. 



No. 23. — Fancy Stripe in Knitting. 



from 1 st row for all the sections of 



Fancy Stripe in Knitting. 

No. 23. — This may be knitted on two needles as 
well as four; but in using two needles, in the alter- 



16 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



nate rows you knit 2, and purl 12, instead of knit- 
ting 12 and purling 2. Cast on any number of 
stitches divisible by 14. Twelve rows or rounds 
complete the design. 

First round. (Four needles). — K 2, th 0, k 1, 




No. 24. — Knitted Stripe for Shawls, Jackets, Etc., Etc. 



th o, k 1, slip and bind, k 3, n, k 1, p 2 and repeat. 
Second and every alternate round including the 
Twelfth. — K 12, p 2 and repeat. 

Third round. — K 2, th o, k 3, th o, k 1, slip and 
bind, k 1, n, k 1. p 2 and repeat. 

Fifth round. — K 2, th o, k 5, th o, k 1, slip 1, 
n, pass slippd stitch over, k 1, p 2 and repeat. 

Seventh round. — Slip and bind, k 3, n, k 1, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 3, p 2 and repeat. 

Ninth round. — Slip and bind, k 1, n, k 1, th o, 
k 3, th o, k 3, p 2 and repeat. 

Eleventh round. — Slip 1, .n, pass slipped stitch 
over, k 1, th o, k 5, th o, k 3, p 2 and repeat. 

Knit the 
12th round as 
directed and 
repeat from 
beginning. 

Knitted 

Stripe for 

Shawls, 

Jackets, 

Etc., Etc. 

No. 24.— 
This stripe 
may be made 
of Shetland or 
Berlin wool, and run through with narrow ribbon, 
after which it is sewed to the garment it is to 
decorate. The stripe is complete in two rows. 
Cast on any number of stitches divisible by 4, cast- 
ing on as many as will be necessary to make the 
stripe as wide as required. 

First row. — Slip 1, th o, k 3 and repeat across the 
row. 

Second roiu. — Slip 1, draw the slipped stitch 
over the first 3 stitches, and then knit 4 plain. 
Draw the second slip stitch over the next 3 stitches. 
Knit 4, and so on across the row at the end of which 




No. 25. — Vandyke Design. 



th o, k 1, th o, n at the 



k 3, th o, si 1, 



pass 



there will be only 3 to knit. Repeat these rows 
until the stripe is as long as required. When the 
stripe is long enough (ending with the second row) 
every 4th plain stitch is dropped and pulled down 
to make the running places for the ribbon, which 
may be satin, velvet or grosgrain. 

Vandyke Design. 

No. 25. — Use two. needles and cast on any num- 
ber of stitches divisible by 9. 

First row. — K 3, * th o, n at the back of the 
work, k 4 and repeat from *. 

Second row. — Purl. 

Third row. — * K 1, n, 
back, and repeat from *. 

Fourth rmv. — Purl. 

Fifth row. — N, * th o, 
slipped stitch over, 
and repeat from *. 

Sixth row. — 
Purl. 

Repeat all the 
details from the 
first row until the 
work is as deep as 
required. 

Cable Pattern. 

No. 26. — Cast 
on any number of 
stitches, arranging 
them so that six 
stitches will be 
used for every 
cable, and six 
stitches will also occur between the cables. 

The following directions are for one cable or 
stripe with six stitches at each side. 

Cast on 18 stitches. 

First, Third and Fifth roivs. — P 6, k 6, p 6. 

Second and 
Fourth rows. — K \ 
6, p 6, k 6. 

Sixth row. — K 
6; take a third 
needle and purl 3, 
leaving them on 
the needle at the 
back. Now with 
the first right-hand 
needle purl the 
next 3 stitches and 
knit 6. 

Seventh rmv. — P 
6, k the 3 stitches 
on the needle at 
the back of the 
work; k 3 stitches 
on the left-hand needle and purl the remaining 6 

Eighth row. — Like the second. 

Then repeat from the first row for all of the work. 

Design for Tops of Mittens, Etc., Etc. 
No. 27. — Use four needles and cast on any num 




No. 26. — Cable Pattern. 




No. 27.— Design for Tops of 
Mittens, Etc., Etc. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



17 




No. 28. — Fancy Design in Knitting. 



ber of stitches divisible by 7. The design is com- 
plete in 11 rounds. 

First round. — Slip and bind, k 5, th o, and repeat. 
Second round. — Slip and bind, £4, th o, ki and 
repeat. 

Third round. — Slip and bind, k 3, th o, k 2 and 

repeat. 

Fourth round. — 
Slip and bind, k 
2, th o, k 3 and 
repeat. 

Fifth round. — 
Slip and bind, k 
1, th o, k 4, and 
repeat. 

Sixth round. — 
Slip and bind, th 
o, k 5, and repeat. 
Now pass the 
first stitch on each 
needle to the next 
needle. This will 
leave one stitch on 
the third needle 
which is consid- 
ered a part of the sixth round and is knitted before 
beginning the next round. 

Seventh round. — Knit 1, th o, k 4, n, and repeat. 
Eighth round. — K 2, th o, k 3, n, and repeat. 
Ninth round. — K 3, th o, k 2, n, and repeat. 
Tenth round. — K 4, th o, k 1, n, and repeat. 
Eleventh round. — K 5, th o, n, and repeat. 
Pass the last stitch on each needle to the next 

needle, and repeat 
from the second 
round. 



Fancy Design in 
Knitting. 

No. 28. — Cast 
on any number of 
stitches divisible 
by 6. The design 
is complete in 12 
rounds. 

First round. — K 
2, n, th o, k 2 and 
repeat. 
round including the 




No. 29. — Fancy-Stripe Design. 



alternate 



Second and every 
Twelfth.— Plain. 

Third round. — K 1, n,, th o, k 3 and repeat. 

Fifth round. — N, th o, k 4 and repeat. 

After knitting all of the 6th round except the 
last stitch, pass the last stitch on each needle onto 
the next needle. 

Seventh round. — N, th o, k 1, th o, si and b, k 1 
and repeat. 

Ninth round. — K 4, th o, si and b and repeat. 

After knitting the 10th round, pass the first 
stitch on each needle onto the next needle; this 
will leave 1 stitch on the. 3rd needle which is con- 
sidered a part of the 10th round and is knitted as 
such before the next round is begun. 




No. 30. — Cable and Herrixg- 
Bone Pattern. 



Eleventh round. — K 1, n, th o, k 1, th o, si and b, 
and repeat. 

Knit the 12th round and then repeat from the 
5th round to the 12th, inclusive, for all of the work. 

Fancy-Stripe Design. 

No. 29. — This design may be used as an inser- 
tion, or as a heading to knitted lace. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by 6, 
with 1 added. 

First row. — K 1, th o, k 1, k 3 together, k 1, 
th o and repeat from beginning ending with k 1. 

Second and every alternate row. — Purl the 1st 
stitch and the single stitch between every 2 
made stitches, and knit the rest. 

Repeat these 2 rows for all the work. 

Cable and Herring-Bone Pattern. 

No. 30. — Cast on any number of stitches divisi- 
ble by 9 with 3 added. 
Knit 4 rows plain. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, th 
o, n, * take the next 3 
stitches off on a 3rd 
needle, and keep this 
needle in front; k 
the next 3 stitches; 
then knit the 3 taken 
off onto the extra 
needle; k 1, th o, n, 
and repeat from *. 

Sixth row. — SI 1, th o, p 2 together, * p 7, th o, 
p 2 together, and repeat from * until the last repe- 
tition, when you purl 6, th o, p 2 together. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, th o, k 2 together, * k 7, 
th"o, k 2 together and repeat from *. 

Eighth row. — Like second. 

Repeat from 5th row for each section cf the 
work. The four plain rows may be knitted after 
every two sections if desired, or the pattern may 
form one continuous stripe by omitting the plain 
rows and 
repeating 
only from 
the 5th 
to the 8th 
rows, inclu- 
sive. 

Loop 
Knitting. 

N0.31. — 
Cast on any 
number of 
stitches re- 
quired by 

the dimensions of the work to be done. Always 
knit the first stitch. 

First row. — Plain. 

Second row. — Throw the yarn around the needle 
as if for knitting, but do not knit it; then carry the 




No. 31. — Loop Knitting. 



18 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



yarn down around the left forefinger and up across 
the needle; then again around the finger and across 
the needle; then knit the 
wind-overs off as One stitch. 
Repeat for every stitch. 

Third row. — Knit plain, 
knitting each group of wind- 
overs as one stitch. 

Repeat the last two rows 
for all the work. 

Design for Clouds or 
Scarfs. 

No. t,z. — This design may 
be made of double zephyr 
and silk or any fine wool. 
It is made by knitting, alter- 
nately, two rows with each variety of yarn or 
thread, with coarse needles. Do not break the ma- 




No. 32. — Design for Clouds or Scarfs 



terial at the ends of the rows; simply carry it along 
from one row to the other. Two colors or one 
may be used in knitting 
articles by this pattern. 
This would form a hand- 
some design for a square 
shawl of white zephyr and 
white knitting silk, if a bor- 
dor of hair-pin work in silk 
and wool were added. A 
number of borders of this 
description are illustrated in 
our book upon " The Art of 
Crocheting." 

In combining colors use 
wool for the white stripe with 
some pale tint of pink, blue, 
lavender, yellow, etc., etc. Ice wool would look 
pretty with zephyr or Germantown yarn. 



-*->ti 



Dg<;ign$ fop^ fan(V $T^ipe$, top<; To AiTTeN<; and 



• Coral Stripe. 

No. i. — Cast on any number of stitches divisi- 
ble by 21. 

First row. — K 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, k 1, 
th o, k 1, th o, k 1, k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, 

k 1, th o, k 1, 

wmmmmmmmmmmmmmm th °» k -• 

Second, 
Fourth, Sixth, 
Eighth, Tenth 
and Twelfth 
rows. — Purl. 

Third row. 
— K 2 togeth- 
er, k 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1, th 

0, k 3, th o, k 

1, k 2 togeth- 
er, k 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1, th 
o, k 3, th o, k 2. 

Fifth row. 
— SI 1, k 2 to- 
gether, pass 
slipped stitch 
over, k 1, th o, 
k 5, th o, k 1, si 1, k-2 together, pass slipped stitch 
over, k 1, th 0, k 5, th o, k 2. 

Seventh roiv. — K 2, th o, k 1, th o, k 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 3, k 2 together, k 1, th o, ki, th o, k 1, 
k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together. 

Ninth 7'07ei. — K 2, th o, k 3, th 0, k 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1, k 2 together, k 1, th o, k 3, th o, k 1, 
k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together. 




No. 1. — Coral Stripe. 



Eleventh row. — K 2, th o, k 5, th o, k 1, si 1, k 2 
together, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 5' 
th o, k 1, si 1, k 2 together, pass slipped stitch over. 

Twelfth row. — Purl as directed and repeat from 
first row. 

Fancy Top for Socks or Mittens. 

No. 2. — This design is completed with a hem 
made on the same plan as that described at 
No. 5 on page 19. 
The design 
calls for any 
number of 
stitches divisi- 
ble by 13, and 
is worked in 10 
rounds. 

First round. 
— Slip and bind, 
k 4, th o, k 1, th 
o, k 4, n and 
repeat. 

Second, Fourth, 
Sixth, Eighth 
and Tenth 
rounds. — Plain. 

Third round. 
— SI and b, k 3, th 0, k 3, th o, k 3, n and repeat. 

Fifth round. — SI and b, k 2, th o, k 5, th o, k 2, 
n and repeat. 

Seventh round. — SI and b, k 1, th o, k 7, th o, k 1, 
n and repeat. 

Ninth round. — SI and b, th o, k 9, th o, n and repeat. 

Knit tenth round plain as directed, and repeat 
from first round for all the pattern. 




No. 2. — Fancy Top for Sooks oh 
Mittens. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



19 



Design for the Tops of Socks or Mittens. 

No. 3. — Cast on any number of stitches divisi- 
ble by 10. The design is formed by two rounds 
alternately knitted to any depth required. Knit 




No. 3. — Design for the Tops of Socks or Mittens. 



around once, plain, after casting on. 

First round. — K 1, th o, k 3, slip 1, 
n, pass slipped stitch over, k 3, th o 
and repeat. 

Second ?-ound. — Plain. Repeat the 
rounds as directed. 

Vine Pattern for Stripe. 

No. 4. — This stripe is pretty knitted 
in wool or cotton, or Belding's knitting 
silk, and maybe used as insertion or as 
a stripe for spreads, afghans, etc., etc. 

Cast on 26 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, n, th o, 
n, th o, k 1, th o, k 2, n, k 4, n, k 2, 
th o, si and b, th o, si and b, th o, si 
and b, k 1. 

Second and every alternate even row. 
—Purl. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, th o, 
n, th o, k 3, th o, k 2, n, k 2, n, k 2, th 
th o, si and b, th o, si and b, k 1. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, th o. 



follows: Cast on loosely (for this design) any number 
of stitches divisible by 8. Knit six or seven rows 
plain, then one row of holes, made thus: Narrow, 
th o and repeat. Then make as many more rows 
of plain knitting as you made before the holes. 
The number of stitches now on the needle should 
be the same as those cast on. Now in the next 
round turn the edge of the work up inside and 
pick up and knit with each stitch on the needle, 
one of the edge or foundation stitches where you 
commenced the work. This will form a perfect 
and neatly-made hem, which may be made as wide 
as desired by increasing the number of plain rows. 
Now begin the design, which is complete in 7 
rounds. 

First round. — Th o, k 6, n. and repeat. 

Second round. — K 1, th 0, k 5, n, and repeat. 

Third round. — K 2, th o, k 4, n, and repeat. 

Fourth round. — K 3, th o, k 3, n, and repeat. 

Fifth round. — K 4, th o, k 2, n, and repeat. 

Sixth round. — K 5, th o, k 1, n, and repeat. 

Seventh round. — K 6, th 
o, n, and repeat. 

Repeat from the first 
round. 

Fancy Hem-Top for 
Socks, Mittens, Etc. 

No. 6. — Cast on any 





No. 4. — Vine Pattern for Stripe. 



o, si and b, 



No. 5.— Fancy Edge for 
Mittens or Socks. 



^d? /^L 



n, th o, k 



5, 



th o, si and b, th o, si and b, 

si and b, th o, si and b, th o, 
k 4, n, k 2, th o, k 1, th o, n, 



th o, k 2, n, n, k 2, 
th o, si and b, k 1. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, 
si and b, th o, k 2, n, 
th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Ninth row. — Si 1, si and b, th o, si and b, th o, 
si and b, th o, k 2, n, k 2, n, k 2, th o, k 3, th o, n, 
th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Eleventh roiv. — SI 1, si and b, th o, si and b, th o, 
si and b, th o, k 2, n, n, k 2, th o, k 5, th o, n, th o, 
n, th o, k 2. 

Purl the 1 2th row as directed, and repeat from 
the 1st row. 

A straight edge may be crocheted along either 
edge of the stripe to convert it into an insertion. 

Fancy Edge for Mittens or Socks. 
No. 5. — This design has a hemmed edge made as 



number of 
stitches di- 
visible by 
13, and 
work in 
5 rounds. 
Make the 
hem as di- 
rected at 
No. 69. 
Then begin 
the design. 

First 
round. — SI 
1, k 2 to- 
gether, pass 
slipped 

stitch over, th o, n, th o, k 1, th o, k 
th 0, n, th o, k 3 together and repeat. 

Second, Third, Fourth and Fitfh rounds 
plain and repeat from the beginning. 




No. 6.- 



Fancy Hem-Top for Socks, 
Mittens, Etc., Etc 



th o, k 1, 
Knit 



20 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Diamond Stripe. 

No. 7. — This stripe develops very handsomely 
in Saxony yarn, Germantown, Dexter's cotton or 
any material suitable for making it for spreads, 
counterpanes, afghans, etc., etc. 

The design was taken from a counterpane com- 
posed of 10 stripes each 13 diamonds long. 

Cast on 63 stitches and knit plain 4 times across; 
also knit similarly at the end of the stripe. 

First row. — K 16, p n, k 4, th o twice, n, k 3, 
p 11, k 16. (In knitting back after a row in which 
there are put-overs, the second half of each double 
put-over is dropped). 

Second row. — K 4, p 8, k 15, p 9, k 15, p 8, k 4. 

Third row — K 16, p 11, k 9, p 11, k 16. 

Fourth row. — Like second. 

Fifth row. — K 30, th o twice, n, th o 
twice, n, k 29. 

Sixth row. — K 
4, p 8, k 4, p 31, 
k 4, p 8, k 4. 

Seventh, Fif- 
teenth, Twenty- 
third, Thirty- 
first, Th i r ty- 
ninth, Forty-sev- 
enth, Fifty-fifth, 
Sixty-third and 
Seventy- first 
rows. — Knit 
plain. 

Fighth row. — 
Like sixth. 

Ninth row. — 
K 16, p 9, k 4, 
th o twice, n, th 
o twice, n, th o 
twice, n, k 3, p 9, 
k 16. 

Tenth row. — 
K 4, p 8, k 13, 
P 13, k 13, p 8, 
k 4 . 

Eleventh row. 
— K 16, p 9, k 
i3, P 9, k 16. 

Twelfth row. — K 4, p 8, k i3,p 13, k 13, p 8, k 4. 

Thirteenth row. — K 28, th o twice, n, th o twice, 
n, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, k 27. 

Fourteenth and Sixteenth rows. — Like sixth row. 

Seventeenth row. — K 4; slip 4 stitches from the 
left hand needle onto a hair-pin and keep them at 
the back of the work; k 4 and then replace the 
slipped stitches on the left hand needle; k 8, p 7, 
k 4, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, th o 
twice n, th o twice, n, k 3, p 7, k 4; slip 4 stitches 
from the left-hand needle onto a hair-pin; k 4; 
replace the stitches as before; k 8. 

Eighteenth row. — K 4, p8,kn,pi7,kn,p8, k4. 

Nineteenth row. — K 16, p 7, k 17, p 7, k 16. 

Twentieth row. — Like eighteenth row. 

Twenty-first row. — K 26, th o twice and narrow, 
6 times; k 25. 




No. 7. — Diamond Stripe. 



Twenty-second and Twenty-fourth rows. — Like 
sixth row. 

Tiventy-fifth row. — K 16, p 5, IC4; tho and n, 
7 times; k 3, p ,5, k 16. 

Twenty-sixth row. — K 4, p 8, k 9, p 21, k 9, 
p 8, k 4. 

Twenty-seventh row. — K 16, p 5, k 21, p5, ki6. 
Twenty-eighth row.- — Like twenty-sixth row. 
Twenty-ninth row. — K 24; th o twice and n, 8 
times, k 23. 

Thirtieth and Thirty-second rows. — Like sixth. 
Thirty-third row. — K 4; pass 4 stitches from 
left-hand needle and slip onto a hair-pin; k 4; 
replace the 4 slipped stitches; k 8, p 3, k 4; th o 
twice and n 9 times; k 3, p 3, k 4; slip next 4 
stitches onto a hair-pin; k 4; replace the slipped 
stitches; k 8. 

Thirty-fourth row. — K 4, p 8, k 7, p 25, k 7, 

P 8, k 4. 

Thirty -fifth 
row. — K 16, p 3, 
k 25, p3, k 16. 

Thirty - sixth 
row. — Like thir- 
ty-fourth row. 

Thirty - seventh 
ro7v. — K 22; th o 
twice and n, 10 
times; k 21. 

Thirty - eighth 
and Fortieth rows. 
— Like sixth. 

Forty -first rotv. 
— K 16, p 3, k 4; 
th o twice and n, 
9 times; k 3, p 3, 
k 16. 

Forty -second 
row. — K 4, p 8, k 
7, P 25, k 7, p 8, 
k 4 - 

Forty-third 
row. — K 16, p 3, 
k 25, p 3, k 16. 

Forty- fou r th 
row. — Like forty- 
second. 
Forty-fifth row. — K 24; th o twice and n, 8 
times; k 23. 

Forty-sixth and Forty-eighth rows. — Like sixth. 
Forty-ninth row. — K 4; pass 4 onto a hair-pin; 
k 4; replace the slipped stitches, k 8, p 5, k 4; th o 
twice and n, 7 times; k 3, p 5, k 4; slip next 4 onto 
a hair-pin; k 4; replace the slipped stitches and k 8. 
Fiftieth roiv. — K 4, p 8, k 9, p 21, k 9, p 8, k 4, 
Fifty-first row. — K 16, p 5, k 21, p 5, k 16. 
Fifty-second row. — Like fiftieth row. 
Fifty-third row. — K 26 ; th o twice end n 6 
times; k 25. 

Fifty-fourth and Fifty-sixth roias. — Like sixth. 
Fifty-seventh row. — K 16, p 7, k 4; th o twice 
and n, 5 times; k 3, p 7, k 16. 

Fifty-eighth row. — K 4, p8, kir, p 17, kn, 
p 8, k 4. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



21 



Fifty-ninth row. — K 16, p 7, k 17, p 7, k 16. 

Sixtieth row. — K 4, p 8, k 11, p 17, k 11, 
p 8, k 4. 

Sixty-first row. — K 28; th o twice and n, 4 times; 
k 27. 

Sixty-second and Sixty-fourth rows. — Like sixth. 

Sixty- fifth row. — K 4 ; slip 4 onto the hair-pin ; 
k 4; replace slipped stitches; k 8, p 9, k 4; th o 
twice and n, 3 times; k 3, p 9, k 4; slip 4 onto 
the hair-pin; k 4; replace slipped stitches and 
k8. 

Sixty-sixth row. — K 4, p 8, k 13, p 13, k 13, 
p 8, k 4. 

Sixty-seventh row. — K 16, p 9, k 13, p 9, k r6. 

Sixtv-eighth row. — Like sixty-sixth row. 

Sixty-ninth row. — K 30; th o twice, n, th o twice, 
n, k 29. 

Seventieth and Seventy-second roivs. — Like sixth 
row. 

Repeat from the first row for the next and fol- 
lowing diamonds. 
Twist the cable at 
the third row of 
holes in the second 
diamond. 



Stripe for an Af- 
ghan or Coun- 
terpane. 

No. 8. — The 
stripe may be made 
of Germantown or 
Spanish knitting 
yarn, or of Dexter 
cotton, according to 
the purpose for 
which it is intended. 

Cast on 50 stitch- 
es. 

First row. — Purl. 

Second row. — Slip 
1, purl 2, knit 2, 
thread over, knit 2 ,. / „:, .-,.=. ■•; 

together, purl '?. 3, 
knit 11, knit' 2 to- 
gether, thread over, knit 1; wrap the thread once 
around the needle, purl 2, thread over, knit 1, 
thread over, slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, 
knit 11, purl 3, knit 2, thread over, knit 2 together, 
purl 3. . 

Third row. — SI 1, k 2, p 2, wrap thread once 
around the needle, purl 2 together, k 3, p 10, p 2 
together crossed (to "cross," insert the needle 
from left to right at the back through both stitches 
at once and purl them off together); purl 3, k 2, 
p 3, p 2 together, p 10, k 3, p 2, wrap thread around 
the needle, p 2 together, k 3. 

Fourth row. — SI 1, p 2, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, p 3, k 9, k 2 together, k 1, th o, k 1, 
th o, k 1, p 2, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 1, si 1, 
k 1, pass slipped stitch over, k 9, p 3, k 2, tho, k 2 
together, p 3. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 2, p 2, wrap the thread 



No. 8. — Stripe foe an Afghan or Counterpane. 



around the needle, p 2 together, k 3, p 8, p 2 to- 
gether crossed, p 5, k 2, p 5, p 2 together, p 8, k 3, 
p 2, wrap the thread around the needle, p 2 to- 
gether, k 3. 

Sixth row. — SI 1, p 2, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
p 3, k 7, k 2 together, k 2, th o, k 1, th o, k 2, p 2, 
k 2, th o, k 1, th o, k 2, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch 
over, k 7, p 3, k 2, th o, k 2 together, p 3. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 2, p 2, wrap thread around 
the needle once, p 2 together, k 3, p 6, p 2 to- 
gether crossed, p 7, k 2, p 7, p 2 together, p 6, 
k 3, p 2, wrap thread around the needle, p 2 
together, k 3. 

Eighth row. — SI 1, p 2, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
P 3, k 5> k 2 together,' k 3, th o, k 1, th o, k 3, p 2, 
k 3, th o, k 1, th o, k 3, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch 
over, k 5, p 3, k 2, th o, k 2 together, purl 3. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 2, p 2, wrap thread around 
the needle, p 2 together, k 3, p 4, p 2 together 
crossed, p 9, k 2, p 9, p 2 together, p 4, k 3, p 2, 

wrap thread around 
the needle, purl 2 
together, k 3. 

Tenth row. — SI 
1, p 2, k 2, th o, 
k 2 together, p 3, 
k 3, k 2 together, 
k 4, th o, k 1, th o, 
k 4, p 2, k 4, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 4, si 1, 
k 1, pass slipped 
stitch over, 
k j 2, th o, 
gether, p 3 
Eleventh 
SI 1, k 2 

thread around the 
needle, p 2 to- 
gether, k 3, p 2, 
p 2 together crossed, 
p 11, k 2, p 11, 
p 2 together, p 2, 
k 3, p 2, wrap 
thread around the 
needle, p 2 togeth- 
er, k 3. 
2, th o, k 2 together, 
5, th o, k 1, th o, 
si 1, k 1, 
th o, k 2 




k 3, P 3, 
k 2 to- 

row. — 
p 2, wrap 



th o, k 5, 
1, P 3, k 2 



Twelfth row. — Si 1, p 2, k 
p 3, k 1, k 2 together, k 
k 5, P. 2 , k 5,_ th o, k 1, 
pass slipped stitch over, k 
together, p 3. 

Thirteenth row. — Si 1, k 2, p 2, wrap thread 
around the needle, p 2 together, k 3, p 2 to- 
gether crossed, p 13, k 2, p 13, p 2 together, 
k 5, wrap thread around the needle, p 2, to- 
gether, k 3. 

Fourteenth row. — SI 1, p 2, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, p 3, k 14, p 2, k 14, p 3, k 2, th o, k 2 

P 3; 
Begin again at the first row and repeat all the 
details just given for the next section of the pat- 
tern, and work in this manner until the stripe is 
about a yard and a-half long. Each of the other 
stripes are of the same length. 



together 



22 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted Design for the Bottom of an Under- 
Shirt or a Petticoat. 

No. 9. — This is - a very pretty border for the 
bottom of either of the garments named, or for in- 
fants 'sacks, 
cloaks and 
dresses. It 
may also be 
used for an 
edging. Un- 
like most 
edgings, 
however, it 
is knitted 
back and 
forth the 
long way of 
the work, 
and for a 
long strip 
of edging to 
be sewed to 
a garment 
would have 
to be knit- 
ted in sec- 
tions. Cast 
on enough 
stitches to 
make the 
garment as 
wide as 
necessary 
(if an un- 
der-ves t) 
using a 
number di- 
visible by 6 
with 1 over. 
First row. — Knit 1, * th o, k 1, slip 1, k 2 to- 
gether, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 1 and 
repeat from * across the work. 
Second row. — Plain. 

Repeat these two rows until the edging is 18 holes 
deep. 

Then knit 3 rows, so that they will appear purled 
on the right side. 

To make the next row of holes: Knit 1, th o, n 
and repeat across the row, knitting the last stitch. 
Next make 3 rows like the 3 preceding the row 
just knit. Then begin the main portion of the gar- 
ment, which is knitted in ribbed style by knitting 2 
and purling 2 alternately. Make this portion ac- 
cording to instructions for ribbed under-shirts, 
which will be found elsewhere in the book. 

In knitting a petticoat with this border, it may 
be knitted in strips or breadths which can be joined 
by over-and-over stitches or single crochet. Per- 
sonal judgment must be exercised in deciding how 
wide or how long to make these strips or breadths, 
since their dimensions will depend upon the size the 
garment is desired to be, and also somewhat upon 
the material from which it is made. 




No. 9. — Design for the Bottom of an 
Under Shirt or Petticoat. 



Fancy-Edge Design with a Hem. 

No. 10. — Two or four needles may be used in 
knitting this design. If two are used, purl the 
alternate rows instead of knitting them. Cast on 
any number of stitches divisible by 9, and com- 
plete the design in 6 rounds. Make the hem as 
directed at No. 69. Then begin the design. 

First round. — SI and b, k 2, th o, k 1, th o, k 2, 
n and repeat. 

Second Fourth and Sixth rounds. — Plain. 

Third round. — SI and b, k 1, th o, k 3, th o, 
k 1. n, and repeat. 

Fifth round. — SI 
and b, th o, k 5, th o, 
n, and repeat. 

Knit 6th round as 
directed and repeat 
from beginning of 
design. . 

Leaf and Trellis 
Pattern. 

No. 11. — Cast on 
any number of stitch- jj _ 
es divisible by 20, as 
20 stitches are need- 
ed for ,each pattern. 

To knit the stripe as illustrated cast on 40 
stitches, using Belding's silk, or crochet cotton. 

First and every alternate row. — Purl. 

Second row. — K 6 ; * th o and n 3 times ; th o, 
k 2, n, k 10, and repeat from *. At the end of the 
last repetition 4 stitches only instead of 10 will 
remain to be knitted. 

Fourth row. — K 2, * n, k 2, th o, k 1 ; th o and 
n 5 times; k 5, and repeat from *. 

Sixth row. — K 1, * n, k 2, th o, k 3, th o and n 




10 — Fancy-Edge Design 
with a Hem. 




No. 11. — Leaf and Trellis Pattern. 

3 times; th o, k 2, n, k 3, and repeat from *. 
Eighth row. — N, k 2, th o, k 5, th o and n 3 
times, th o, k 2, n, k 1 and repeat from beginning 
of row. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



23 



Tenth row. — K 3, * th o, k 7; th o and n 3 times; 
th o, k 2, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, k 2 and 
repeat from *. In the last repetition there will be 
but 1 stitch to pass the slipped stitch over, before 
the edge stitches. 

Twelfth row. — N, k5; * n and th o 5 times; k 1, 
th o, k 2, n, k 5 and repeat from *. 

Fourteenth row. — K 5, * n, k 2; th o and n 3 




No. 13.- 



-Design for Tops of Socks 
or Mittens. 



No. 14. — Design for Tops of 
Socks or Mittens, with a Hem. 



times; th 0, k 


3, th 0, k 2, n, 


k 3 


and repeat 


Sixteenth row 
times; th 0, k 


. — Knit 4, * n, k : 
5, th 0, k 2, n, 


:; th 
k 1, 


and n 3 

and repeat 


from 

Eighteenth row. — K 3, n, k 2 ; * th 
times; th 0, k 7, th 0, k 2, si 1, n, pass 
stitch over, k 2 and repeat from *. 

Repeat from 3rd row for all the work 


and n 3 
the slipped 



Cast on any number of stitches divisible by 5. 
Knit back and forth 5 times so that all the stitches 
will appear to be plain knitting on the right side. 
Sixth row. — * K 1, th o twice, k 2 together; re- 
peat from * across the work. 

Seventh row. — * Knit 1 ; k 1 and purl 1 out of the 
put-over, and repeat from * across the work. 

Eighth to Twelfth roivs (inclusive). — Purl 2, k 1 
alternately across the row. In 
coming back knit the purled 
stitches and purl the knitted ones 
of the preceding row. 

Thirteenth row. — Th o, k 2 
together; repeat across the row. 
Fourteenth row. — Purl. 
Fifteenth and Sixteenth rows. — 
Knit. 

Seventeenth row. — Purl. 
Eighteenth row. — * Purl 3, k 2 
together, th o and repeat from * 
across the row, making an extra 
stitch at the end. 

Nineteenth to the Twenty-first 

row (inclusive). — Knit 3, purl 2, 

but in the 20th row (working 

back), purl the knitted stitches and knit the 

purled ones. 

Twenty-second row. — * Purl 3, th o, k 2 together; 
repeat from * across the row. 

Twenty-third to the Twe?ity-fifth row. — K 3, 
purl 2; in working back in the 24th row, knit the 
purled stitches and purl the knitted ones. 

Now repeat all the details from the 18th row, 




Design For Tops of Socks or Mittens. 

No. 13. — Use four needles. Cast on any number 
of stitches divisible by 11 and knit once around 
plain. The design is complete in 4 rounds. 

First round. — N, n, th o, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 1, 
th o, n, n, and repeat. 

Second, Third and Fourth rounds. — Plain. 

Repeat these directions in the order given until 
the work is as deep as you desire it to be. 

Design for Tops of Socks or Mittens, 
with a Hem. 

No. 14. — Begin with a hem made as directed at 
No. 69, casting on (for the design) any number of 
stitches divisible by 5. The design is complete in 
8 rounds. 

First round. (After fastening the hem). — Th o, 
k 3, n, and repeat. 

Second Fourth Sixth and Eighth rounds. — Plain. 

Third round. — K 1, th o, k 2, n, and repeat. 

Fifth round. — K 2, th o, k 1, n, and repeat. 

Seventh round. — K 3 th o, n, and repeat. 

Knit 8th round as directed and repeat from 1st 
round for all the work. 

Design for Scarf Shawls. 

No. 15. — This design is very pretty for scarf- 
shawls made of Saxony yarn or Shetland wool, and 
is knitted on medium-size steel needles. 




No. 15. — Design Fob Scarf Shawls. 



until the shawl is as long as required. Then knit 
the border to correspond with the one first knitted. 
Turn the plain knitting at the lower edge of each 
border up underneath the first row of holes and 
fasten it in hem fashion. 



24 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



kNiTTeD eDGING$ AN0 IN^^TlON^. 



Knitted Pointed Edging and Insertion. 



Nos. i and 3. — For the Edging 
stitches and knit across plain. 
First row. — Knit 4, * th o, n; 



-Cast on 32 




No. 1. — Knitted Pointed Edging. 



6, then like 



th o, n, k 3, 
and repeat 
twice more 
from*. *Th 
o, n, and 
repeat twice 
more from 
last *; th o, 
k 1. 

Second 
row. — Knit 
plain. 

Third row. 
—Knit 5, th 
o, n, th o, 
n, k 3, and 
repeat first 
row from 
first* for bal- 
ance of 3rd 
row. 

Fourth 
row. — Plain, 
first row from 



Fifth row. — K 
first *. 

Sixth row. — Plain. 

Knit in this manner, increasing by one stitch at 
the beginning of each row, until there are n rows 
with 9 stitches at the beginning of the nth row, 
and 6 holes. 

Twelfth and Thirteenth rows. — Plain. 
Fourteenth row. — K 2 together, * th o, n, and re- 
peat 3 times more from *. * K 3, th o, n, th o, n, 
and repeat twice more from last *. Knit remainder 
of row plain. 

Fifteenth row. — Plain. 

Sixteenth row. — Same as 14th. Continue to knit 

like this 
for the last 
half of the 
point until 
there are 
24 rows, 
with 32 
stitches on 
the needle 
in the last 
row. 

Tw e n ty- 
fifth and Twenty -sixth rows. — Plain. 

Repeat from 1st row for all the points. At each 
point and angle, be sure to make 2 rows of plain 
knitting, otherwise the angles will not come out as 
distinctly as they should to be effective. 




No. t. — Knitted Passementebie Edging. 



For The Insertion. 

Cast on 29 stitches and knit across plain. 

First rmu. — K 4, * th o, n, th o, n, k 3, and re- 
peat twice more from *. Knit the rest plain. 

Second row. — Knit plain. Continue in the same 
order as in the edging, omitting the holes for the 
point and knitting plain at each side of the holes 
made at the middle. In the 6th row of holes, 
there will be 9 plain stitches before narrowing, 
and 2 at the end of the row. Then knit across 
twice, plain; and at the beginning of the next 
row, knit 4 plain before beginning to narrow. 
Then follow the preceding directions for the rest 
of the point. 

Knitted Passementerie Edging. 

No. 2. — This lace is very pretty to use as 
passementerie in edging velvet bands, or collars, 
sleeves, etc., etc. In making it, use crochet silk 
and No. 
19 steel 
needles. 

Cast on 
5 stitches, 
and knit as 
follows: 

First row. 
— T h r e a d 
over twice, 
purl 2 
together, 
thread over, 
purl 2 
toge ther, 
threadover, 
purl 1. 

Second 
row. — Knit 

1, (knit 1, purl 1 in loop), knit 1, (knit 1, purl 1 
in loop), thread over, purl 2 together. 

Third row. — Thread over twice, purl 2 together, 
knit the rest plain. 

Fourth row. — Bind off 3, knit 2, put thread over, 
purl 2 together. Repeat from first row. 

Vandyke Edging. 

(See next Page.) 

No. 4. — Cast on n stitches and knit across plain. 

First row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 1, th o 
twice, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 together, k 1. 

Second row. — SI 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 3, th o, 
k 2 together, k 1. 

Third rcnv. — SI 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 3, 
th o twice, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Fourth ron>. — SI 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 5, th o, 
k 2 together, k 1. 




No. 3.— Knitted Pointed Insertion. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



25 



Fifth row. — SI i, k 2, th 0, k 2 together, k 5, 
th o twice, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 together 
k 1. 

Sixth row. — SI 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p i,k 7, th o, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 7, 



Knitted Pointed Edging. 
5. — Cast on 22 stitches and knit across 

k 10, 



-Knit 3, th o twice, narrow, 




No. 4. — Vandyke Edging. 
(For Directions see Page 24.) 

th o twice, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Eighth roiv. — SI 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 9, 
th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

JVintk rcnv. — SI 1, 
k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 9, th o 
twice, k 2 together, 
th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Tenth row. — SI t, 
k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, 
k n, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Eleventh row, — SI 
i, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 11, th o 
twice, k 2 together, 
th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — 
SI 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 13, th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Thirteenth row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 13, th o twice, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Fourteenth row.- — SI 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 15, 
th o, k 2 together; k 1. 

Fifteenth r<?7£>.— -SI 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 15, th o twice, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Sixteenth row. — SI 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 17, 
th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Seventeenth row. — SI 1, k ,2, th o, k 2 together; 
knit rest plain. 

Eighteejith row. — Cast off until there are 10 
stitches on the left-hand needle and 1 on the right; 
knit the rest plain. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 




No. 5. — Knitted Pointed Edging, 



No. 
plain. 

First row.- 
th o twice, n, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Second row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 12, 
P 1, k 3 . 

Third and Fourth rows. — Plain. 

Fifth row. — K 3, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, 
k 12, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, th o twice, 
n, k 1. 

Sixth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 14, 
p 1, k 2, p 1, k3. 

Seventh row. — Plain. 

Eighth row. — K 3, n, * k 1, n, and repeat 7 times 
more from *; k 2. 

Ninth row. — K 3, * th o twice, n, and repeat 8 
times more from *; k 1. 

Tenth row. — K 3, p 1, * k 2, pi, and repeat 7 
times more from *; k 3. 

Eleventh row. — Plain. 

Twelfth row. — K 3, n, k 1, and repeat across the 
row, knitting the last 2 plain. 

Thirteenth row. — Knit 3, * th o twice, n, and 
repeat 8 times more from *; k 1. 

Fourteenth row. — K 3, p 1, * k 2, p 1, and repeat 

7 times more from 
*; k 3. 

Fifteenth row. — 
Plain. 

Sixteenth row.^— 
Bind off 9 stitch- 
es or until there 
are 21 stitches left 
on the left-hand 
needle. Knit these 
plain and repeat 
from the first row. 

Knitted Eyelet- 
Edging. 

No. 6. — Cast on 

8 stitches and knit 
across plain. 

First row. — SI 1, 
knit 1, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2, th o 3 times, k 2. 

Second row. — K 2; of the 3 put-overs, knit the 
1 st, purl the 2nd and 
knit the 3rd; k 2, th 
o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2. 

Third row. — SI 1, 
k 1, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 7. 

Fourth row. — K 7, 
th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 2. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, 
k 1, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 7. 

Sixth row. — Cast off 3, k 3, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 2. 

Repeat from the first row for all the work. 




No. 6- 



- Knitted Ey islet- 
Edging. 



26 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Lattice Edging. 

No. 7. — This design is equally suitable for silk 
or worsted thread or cotton. Cast on 23 stitch- 
es, and knit across plain. 
First row. — Slip 1, k 2, 
th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 
together, and repeat across 
the row. 

Second row. — K 17, p 1, 
k 1, pi, k 3 . 

Third row. — Slip 1, k 2, 
th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 
together, knit plain to end 
of row. 

2 T ourth row. — Knit plain 
until 6 stitches are left, then 
p 1, k 1, p 1, k 3. 

Fifth row. — Slip 1, k 2, 
th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 
together; knit plain to end 
of row. 

Sixth 'row. — K 1, * thread 
over the needle 4 times, k 
1, th o 4 times, k 1, and 
repeat from * until 6 are 
left on the needle; pi, k 1, 
P 1, k 3. 

Seventh row. — Slip 1, k 2, 
th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 together; * slip off the 
4-times wound-over thread, letting it fall in front 
of the needle, and slip the next stitch on the other 
needle. Repeat from * across the work, thus 
making 16 long stitches on the needle. 

Eighth row. — Slip the 16 long stitches onto 
the other needle, * then pass 4 of these stitches 

over 4, and 
knit the 8 
plain ; repeat 
from * across 
the work. 

Ninth row. 
— Knit plain 
until there are 
6 stitches left 
on the needle, 
pi, k 1, p 1, 

k 3 - 

Tenth roiv. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, th o, 
k 2 together; knit remainder plain. t 

Eleventh row. — Knit plain until 6 are left; then 
p 1, k 1, p 1, k 3. Repeat from the first row for 
all the work. The needles used should be of 
a size adapted to the thread. 

Narrow Pointed Edging. 

No. 8. — This edging may be made of Belding's 
silk or of fine cotton. 

Cast on 5 stitches and knit across plain. 
First row. — SI 1, th o, n, th o, k 2. 
Second and every alternate rent). — SI 1, k rest plain. 
Third row. — SI 1, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 1. 
Fifth row. — SI 1, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 
Seventh row. — SI 1, th o, n, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 1. 




No. 1. — Lattice Edging, 




No. 8. — Narrow Pointed Edging. 



Ninth row. — SI 1, th o, n, th o, n, th o, n, tho, k 2. 
Eleventh row. — SI 1, th o, n, th 0, n, th o, n, th 0, 
n, th o, k 1. 

Thirteenth roiv. — SI 1, th o, n, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Fifteenth row. — Cast off 
8, th o, n, th o, k 1. 

Sixteenth row. — P lain. 
Repeat from first row for all 
the points. 

Knitted Leaf Edging. 

No. 9. — Cast on 19 stitch- 
es and knit across plain. 

First row. — SI 1, k 1, th 
o, n, th o, n, p 2, k 1, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 1, p 2, k 2, th o, 
twice, n, th o twice, k 2. 

Second row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, 
p 1, k 4, p 5,k 2, p s, k 1. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 1, th 
o, n, th o, n, p 2, k 2, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 2, p 2, k 9. 

Fourth row. — K 11, p. 7, 
k 2, p s, k 1. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, 
n, th o, n, p 2, k 3, th o, k 1, th 
o, k 3, p 2, k 2, th o twice, n, th 
o twice, n, th o twice, n, k 1. 
Sixth roiv. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 4, p 9, 
k 2, p 5, k 1. 

Seventh roiv. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, p 2, k 4, 
th o, k 1, th o, k 4, p 2, k 12. 

Eighth row. — K 14, p 11, k 2, p 5, k 1. 
Ninth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, p 2, k 11, 
p 2, k 12. 

Tenth row. — Cast off 5, k 8, p 11, k 2, p 5, k 1. 
Eleventh row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, p 2, 
si and b, k 7, n, p 2, k 2, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, k 1. 
Twelfth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 4, p 9, k 2, p 5, k 1. 
Thirteenth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, p 2, 
si and b, k 5, n, p 2, k 9. 

Fourteenth row. — K 11, p 7, k 2, p 5, k 1. 
Fifteenth roiv. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, p 2, 
si and b, k 3, n, p 2, k 2, th o twice, n, tho 
twice, n, th o 
twice, n, k 1. 

Sixteenth row. 
— K 3, p 1, k 2, 
p 1, k 2, p 1, k 

4, P 5, k 2 - P 5. 
k 1. 

Seventeenth 
row. — SI 1, k 1, 
th o, n, th o, n, 
p 2, si and b, k 
1, n, p 2, k 12. 

Eighteenth 
row. — K 14, p 
3, k 2, p 5, k 1. 

Nineteenth row. — SI 1, 
k 3 together, p 2, k 12. 

Twentieth roiv. — Cast off 4, k 12, p 5, k 1. 

Repeat from the first row for all the work. 




No. 9. — Knitted Leaf Edging. 



k 1, th o, n, th o, 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



27 



Insertion Edging. 

No. 10. — By omitting the points of this edging, 
an insertion may b^ formed which will match the 
edging. The work maybe 
done with cotton or linen, 
or with knitting silk. 

Cast on 25 stitches and 
knit across plain. 

First row. — SI 1, k 2, 
th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 2, 
th o, n, k 5, th o, n, k 1, 
th o twice, n, th o twice, 
n, k 1. 

Second row. — K 3, pi, 
k 2, p 1, k 3, th o, n, k 12, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 2, 
th o, n, k 2, th o, n, k 2, 
th o, n, k 4, th o, n, k 3, 
th o, n, th o twice, n, th o 
twice, n, k 1. 

Fourth row. — K 3, pi, 
k 2, p 1, k 5, th o, n, k 12, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Fifth roiu. — SI 1, k 2, 
th o, n, k 3, th o, n, k 2, th 
o, n, k 3, th o, n, k 5, th o 
twice, n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Sixth row. — K 3, p 1, 
k 2, p 1, k 7, th o, n, k 12, th o, n, k 1. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 4, th o, n, k 2, 
th o, n, k 2, th o, n, k 12. 

Eighth row. — Bind off 6 
n, k 1. 



p 2 together, k 3, p 1, 
k 4, th o, 




Eighth row. — Th o twice, 
k 4, p 1, k 2. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, 
n, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together. 

Tenth row. — Th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 2, p 1, k 5, 
p i, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — SI 1, 



o, n, k 5/ 
o twice, p 2 



th 
to- 



Insertion Edging. 



k 7, th o, n, k 12, th o, 
Repeat from first row for all the work. 



Scollop Edging. 

No. 11. — Cast on 10 stitches and knit across plain. 

First row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, th o 3 
times, n, th o twice, p 2 together. 

Second row. — Th o twice, purl 2 together, k 2; 
then out of the 3 put-overs, p 1, k 1, p 1; k 1, p 1, 
k 1, p 1, k 2. 

Third row — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 4, 
th o twice, p 2 together. 

Fourth row. — Th o twice, p 2 together, k 5, p 1, 

k 2, p 1, 



No. 11. 



together, k 4, 
Seventh row- 
th o twice, p 2 together 









k 2. 








Fifth 








row . — SI 








1, k 1, th 








0, n, k 2, 








th 0, n, k 3, 








th twice, 








purl 2 to- 
gether. 


Scollop Edging 




Sixth 
row. — Th 








twice, ]) 2 


p 1, k 
—SI 1, k 1, 


3, 
th 


P 1, 
0, n, k 


k 2. 
3, th 0, n, k 2, 



k 1, th 
o, n, th 
gether. 

Twelfth ■ row. — C a s t 
off 3 stitches; place 
all the stitches on one 
needle; then, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 5, p 1, 
k 2 . 

Repeat from the begin- 
ning for the next scollop. 

Pointed Edging. 

No. 12. — Cast on 22 
stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — SI 1, k 1, 
th o, k 1, sl 1, n, pass slip- 
ped stitch over, k 1, th o, 
k 2, th o, n, th o, n, th o, 
k 9 . 

Second and every alternate row. — SI 1 and knit 
the rest plain. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, k 1, sl 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 3, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o, k 9. 

Fifth row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, k 1, sl 1, 
n, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 4, 
th o, n, th o, n, 
th o, k 9. 

Seventh row. — 
Sl 1, k 1, th o, 
k 1, sl 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch 
over, k 1, th o, 
k 5, th o, n, th o, 
n, th o, k 9. 

Ninth roiv. — 
Sl 1, k 1, th o, 
k 1, sl 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch 
over, k 1, th 
o, k 6,. th o, n, 
th o, n, th o, k 9. 

Eleventh row. — Sl 1, k 1, th o, k 1, sl 1 
slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 7, th o, n, 
th o, k 9. 

Thirteenth row. — Sl 1, k 1, th o, k 1, sl 1, n 
slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 8, th o, n, th o, n_ 
th o, k 9. 

Fifteenth row. — Sl 1, k 1, th o, k 1, sl 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 9, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o, k 9. 

Sixteenth row. — Cast off 8, k 21. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 




No. 12. — Pointed Edging. 



n, pass 
th o, n. 



pass 



28 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




Knitted Lace. 

No. 13. — Cast on 25 stitches. 

First row. — K 2, th o twice, purl 2 together, k 6, 
put 4 stitches over 1 stitch, th o twice, k 2, th o 
twice, purl 2 togeth- 
er, k 1, th o, n, th 
o, n, th o, k 2. 

Second row. — K 8, 
th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 2. Now 
make 4 stitches out 
of the long loop of 
the put-over by knit- 
ting one-half stitch 
and purling one-half 
stitch alternately, 
twice. K 6, th o 
twice, p 2 together, 
k 2. 

Third row. — K 2, 
th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 12, th o 
twice, p 2 together, 
k 2, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o, k 2. 

Fourth row. — K 
9, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 6. Put 4 
stitches over 1 as 
before. Th o twice, k 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Fifth row. — K 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 
Now make 4 stitches out of the long loop of the 
put-over as before. K 6, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 3, th o, n,'tho, n, th o, k 2. 

Sixth row. — K 10, th o twice, p 2 together, k 12, 
th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Seventh row. — K 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 6. 
Put 4 stitches over 1. Th o twice, k 2, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 4, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Eighth row. — Bind off 4, which will leave 22 
stitches on the left-hand needle; k 6, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 2. Make 4 stitches out of the long 
put-over loop as before. K 6, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 2. 

Ninth row. — K 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 12, 
th o twice, p 2 together, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Tenth row. — K 8, th o twice, p 2 together, k 6. 
Put 4 stitches over 1. Th o twice, k 2, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — K 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 
Make 4 stitches out of the long put-over. K 6, 
th o twice, p 2 together, k 2, th o, n, th 0, n, th o, k 2. 

Twelfth row. — K 9, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 12, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Thirteenth row. — K 2, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 6. Put 4 stitches over 1. Th o twice, k 2, th o 
twice, p 2 together, k 3, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Fourteenth row. — K 10, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2. Make 4 stitches out of the long put-over. 
K 6, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Fifteenth row. — K 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 12, 
th o twice, p 2 together, k 4, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Sixteenth row. — Bind off 4, which will leave 24 



stitches on the left-hand needle. K 6, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 6. Put 4 stitches over 1. Th o 
k 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

2, th o twice, p 2 together, 
out 



twice. 

Seventeenth row. — K 
k 2. Make 4 stitches 



No. 13.— Knitted LaCB. 



of the long put-over. 
K 6, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 1, th o, 
n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 
Eighteenth row. — 
K 8, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 12, th o 
twice, p 2 together, 
k 2. 

Nineteenth row. — 
K 2, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 6. Put 
4 stitches over 1. 
Th o twice, k 2, th 
o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o, k 2. 

Twentieth row. — 
K 9, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 2. Make 
4 stitches out of the 
long put-over. K 6, 
th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 2. 

Twenty-first row. 
— K 2, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 12, th o twice, purl 2 together, th o, 
n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Twenty-second row. — K 10, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 6. Put 4 over 1. Th o twice, k 2, th o 
twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Twenty-third row. — K 2, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2. Make 4 stitches out of the long put-over. 
K 6, th o twice, p 2 together, k 4, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o, k 2. 

Twenty-fourth row. — Bind off 4, which will leave 
24 stitches on the left-hand needle; k 6, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 12, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Repeat 
from first 
row for all 
of the work. 




No. 14. — Knitted Edging. 



Knitted 
Edging. 

No. 14. 
— To make 
this pretty 
edging, use 

fine needles and white or unbleached linen, silk, 
or cotton thread. Cast on 5 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1, inserting the needle from the 
back of the stitch under the working thread; 
purl 4. 

Second row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o 4 times, k 2. 

Third row. — Slip i,ki; out of the 4 put-overs, 
k 1 and k 3 crossed (to knit crossed, insert the 
needle from the back downward); k 3. 

Fourth row. — Slip 1, k 8. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



29 



Fifth row. — Slip i, k i; 3 times by turns, th o 
and p 2 together; then k 1. 

Sixth row. — Slip 1, k 8. 

Seventh row. — Cast off 4, inserting needle as be- 
fore; p 3, k 1. 

Repeat from the 2nd to the 7th rows for all the 
work. 

Imported Edging. 

No. 15. — Cast on 26 stitches and knit across plain. 

First row. — Slip 1, k 1, n, th o, k 8, p 2 together, 
th o; (th o here and through the work after purling, 
means to leave the thread in front of the needle 
after purling and before knitting the next stitch, 
in order to increase one stitch) k 1, p 2 together, th 
o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, k 1, th o, k 2, th o, n, k 1. 

Second row. — K4, th o, n, k 21. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 7, p 2 together, 
th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Fourth row. — K 4, th o, n, th o, n, k 20. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 6, p 2 together, 
th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Sixth roiv. — K 4; th o and n, 3 times; k 19. (The 
thread is put over before each narrowing.) 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 5, p 2 together, 
th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 1; th o and n, 3 times, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Eighth row. — K 4, th o and n, 4 times; k 18. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k4, p 2 together, 
th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 1; th o and n,4 times; k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Tenth rmv. — K 4; th o and n, 5 times; k 17. 

Eleventh roiv. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 3, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, k r, p 2 together, th o, k 1, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, k 1, th o, ki; 
th o and n, 5 times; k 1, th o, 
n, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — K 4; th o 
and n, 6 times; k 16. 

Thirteenth row. — SI 1, k 1, 
n, th o, k 2, p 2 together, th 

0, k 1, p 2 together, th o, k 

1, p 2 together, th o, k 1, th 

0, ki; th o and n, 6 times; 
k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Fourteenth row. — K 4; th 
o and n, 7 times; k 15. 

Fifteenth rmv. — SI 1, k 1, 
n, th o, k 1, p 2 together, ■ 
th o, k 1, p 2 together, th o, 
k 1, p 2 together, th o, k 1, 
th o, k 1 ; th o and n, 7 times; 
k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Sixteenth row. — K 4; th 
o and n, 8 times; k 14. 

Seventeenth row. — SI 1, k 

1, n, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o, k 3 
together, n; th o and n, 6 times; k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Eighteenth row. — K 4; th o and n, 7 times; k 14. 

Nineteenth row. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 4, th o, n, 
k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, n; th o and n, 5 times; k 1, 
th o, n, k 1. 



Twentieth row. — K 4; th o and n, 6 times; k 15. 

Twenty-first row. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 5, th o, n, 
k 1, th o, n, k 1, tho, n, n; th o and n, 4 times; k 1, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Twenty-second. — K 4; th o and n, 5 times; k 16. 

Twenty-third row. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 6, th o, 
n, k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, n; th o and n, 3 times; 
k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Twenty-fourth row. — K 4; th o and n, 4 times; k 17. 

Twenty- 
fifth row. — 
SI 1, k 1, n, 
th o, k 7, 
th o, n, k 1, 
tho, n, k 1, 
. th o, n, n ; 
th o and n 
twice; k 1, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Twenty- 
sixth row. 
— K 4; th 
o, and n, 3 
times; k 18. 

Twenty- 
seventh row 
th o, n, k 1, 




No. 16.— Open-Work Insertion. 




No. 15. — Imported Edging 



— SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 8, th o, n, k 1, 
th o, n, n, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 
Twenty-eighth row, — K 4; th o and n, twice; k 19. 
Twenty-ninth row. — SI 1, k 1, n, th o, k 9, th o, 
n, k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Thirtieth row. — K 4, th o, n, k 20. Repeat from 
1 st row. 

Open-Work Insertion. 

No. 16. — Cast on 28 stitches. 
First rmv. — SI 1, th o, k 2 together twice, th o, 
n, k 5, n, th o, n, k 5, n, th 
o, n, k 1, th o, n. 

Second row. — SI 1, th o, n, 
k 1; k 1 and p 1 out of the 
put-overs; k 7; k 1 and p 1 
out of the put-overs; k 7; k 
1 and p 1 out of the put- 
overs; k 2, th o, n. 

Third roiv. — SI 1, th o, n, 
k 7, n, th o, k 2 together 
twice; th o, n, k 8, th o, n. 

Fourth roiv. — SI 1, th o, n, 
k 8; k 1 and p 1 out of the 
put-overs; k 2; k 1 and p 1 
out of the put-overs; k 9, 
th o, n. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, th 0, n, 
k 5, n, th o, k 2 together 
twice; th o, k 2 together 
twice, th o, n, k 6, th o, 11. 

Sixth row. — SI 1, th o, n, 
k 6; k 1 and p 1 out of the 
put-overs; k 2; k 1 and p 1 out of the put-overs; 
k 2; k 1 and p 1 out of the put-overs; k 7, th o, n. 
Seventh row. — Same as third. 
Eighth row. — Same as fourth. 
Ninth row. — Same as first. 
Tenth row. — Same as second. 



30 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Eleventh rmv. — SI i, th o, n, k 2; n, th o, n, k 10, 
n, th o, n, k 3, th o, n ; 

Twelfth row. — SI 1, th o, n, k 3; k 1 and p 1 
out of the put-overs; k 12; k 1 and p 1 out of 
the put-overs; k 4, th o, n. 

Thirteenth row. — SI 1, th o, k 2 together twice, 
th o, k 2 together twice; th o, n, k 6, n, th o, 
k 2 together twice; th o, n, k 1, th o, n. 

Fourteenth row. — SI 1, th o, n, k 1; k 1 and p 1 
out of the put-overs; k 2; k 1 and p 1 out of the 
put-overs; k 8; k 1 and p 1 out of the put-overs; 



pass si st over, k 20, th o 
k 1, p 1, k 21, p 1, 




No. 17. — Shell La.ce. 

k 2; k 1 and p i out of the put-overs; k 2, th o, n. 
Fifteenth row. — Same as eleventh. 
Sixteenth row. — Same as twelfth. 
Repeat from first row. 

Shell Lace. 

No. 17. — -This lace may be made of thread or of 
crochet cotton. 

Cast on 18 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1, knit 1, thread over, slip 1, 
knit 1, pass slipped stitch over last stitch knit, thread 
over, slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, thread 
over twice, narrow, knit 7, thread over twice, nar- 
row, knit 1. 

Second row. — Thread over twice, narrow, knit 1, 
purl 1, knit 9, purl 1, knit 1, purl 1, k 1, p 1, knit 2. 

Third row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st 
over, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st over, k 11, th o 
twice, n, k 1, drop 1. 

Fourth row. — Th o twice, n, k 1, p 1, k 12, p 1, 
k 1, p 1, k 2. 

Fifth row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st 
over, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st over, th o twice, n, 
th o twice, n, k 8, th o twice, n, k 1, drop 1. 

Sixth row. — Th o twice, n, k 1, p 1, k 10, p 1, 
k 2, p 1, k 1, p 1, k 1, p 1, k 2. 

Seventh rozv. — SI 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st 
o, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st o, k 15, th o twice, n, 
k 1, drop 1. 

Eighth row. — Th o twice, n, k 1, p 1, k 16, p 1, 
k 1, p 1, k 2. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st 
over, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st over, th o twice, n, th o 
twice, n, th o twice, n, k 10, th o twice, n, k 1, drop 1. 

Tenth row. — Th o twice, n, k 1, p 1, k 12, p 1, 
k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 1, p 1, k 1, p 1, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si 



st over, th o, si 1, k 1, 
twice, n, k 1, drop 1.. 

Twelfth row. — Th o twice, n, 
k 1, p 1, k 2. 

Thirteenth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si 
st o, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st over, th o twice, n, 
th o twice, n, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, k 13, th o 
twice, n, k 1, drop 1. 

Fourteenth row. — Th o twice, n, k 1, p 1, k 15, 
p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 1, p 1, k 1, p 1, k 2. 
Fifteenth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st 
o, th o, si 1, k 1, pass si st o, k n, 
bind over to 1 stitch all the rest 
on the needle, and knit off bind- 
ing stitch. 

Sixteenth row. K 13, p 1, k 1, 
p 1, k 2. 

Repeat from the first row for all 
the work. 

Knitted Torchon Lace. 

No. 18. — According to the ma- 
terial used, this lace is suitable 
for trimming gowns, underwear, 
counterpanes or knitted or cash- 
mere shawls. It is knitted as 
follows: 

Cast on 34 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1, k 3, make 1, k 2 together at 
the back, k 3, k 2 together, make 1, p 3, make 1, 
k 2 together at the back, k 3, make 1, k 2 together 
at the back, * make 1, k 2 together. Repeat from 
* 5 times more, k 1. 

Second row. — Slip 1, k 23, p 5, k 3; in the next 
stitch both knit and purl a stitch, knit 1. 

Third row. — Slip 1, k 5, make 1, k 2 together 
at the back, k 1, k 2 together, make 1, p 5, 
make 1, k 2 togeth- 
er at the back, k 
3, * make 1, k 
2 together. Repeat 
from * 5 times 
more, k 2. 

Fourth row. — Slip 
h k24, p3, ks, ki, 
and p 1 both in the 
same stitch, k 1. 

Fifth row.- — Slip 
1, k 7, make 1, k 3 
stitches together, 
make 1, p 7, make 
1, k 2 together at 
the back, k 3, * 
make 1, k 2 togeth- 
er. Repeat from * 
5 times more, k 1. 

Sixth row. — Slip 
1, k 25, p 1, k 7, k 
stitch, k 1. 

Seventh row. — Slip 1, k 6, k 2 together, make 1, 
k 3, make 1, k 2 together at the back, p 3, k 2 to- 
gether, make 1, k 3, k 2 together, make 1, k 1 from 
the back, * make 1, k 2 together. Repeat from * 
4 times more, k 2. 




No. 18.— Knitted Tokchon Lack. 



1 and p 1 both in the same 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



31 



Eighth roiv. — Slip i, k 24, p 3, k 6, knit 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Ninth row. — Slip 1, k 4, k 2 together, make 1, 
k 5, make 1, k 2 together at the back, p 1, k 2 to- 
gether, make 1, k 3, 
k 2 together, make 
1, k 1 at the back, 
* make 1, k 2 
together. Repeat 
from * 5 times 
more, k 1. 

Tenth row. — Slip 
I -k23, P5, k4, knit 
2 together, k 1. 

Eleventh row. — 
Slip 1, k 2, k 2 to- 
gether, make 1, k 7, 
make 1, k 3 togeth- 
er, make 1, k 3, k 2 
together, make 1, 
2 together. Repeat 




No. 19. — Knitted Edging. 



k 1 at the back, * make 1 
from * 5 times more, k 2. 

Twelfth row. — Slip 1, k 21, p 7, k 2, k 2 together, 
k 2. Repeat from 
first row. 

Knitted Edging. 

No: 19. — This edg- 
ing is pretty whether 
knitted in silk, cot- 
ton or linen, and ac- 
cording to the mate- 
rial selected may be 
used to trim dresses 
or under-wear. 

Cast on 13 stitches 
and knit across plain. 

First row. — SI 1, 
k 1, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 1, n, tho, 
k i,th o, n, k 1, th o 
twice, k 2. 

Second row. — K 3, 
pi, k 2, th o, k 3, th 
gether, k 2. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 1, 
k 2, th o, k 5, th o, n, k 4. 

Fourth row. — Cast off 2 
k 2, th o, k 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
n, k 1, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, k 1, n, k 1. 

Sixth row. — K 4, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, k 1, n, th o 
twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, n, k 1, th o twice, p 3 together, th o, k 1, 
n, k 2. 

Eighth row. — K 9, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2 
and repeat. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 

Knitted Lace. 
No. 20. — Cast on 18 stitches. 




No. 20. — Knitted Lace 



o, k 2 



th o twice, p 2 to- 
th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2, th o, k 3, th o, n, 



First row. — Knit 1, * th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 2, 
th o, n, k 3, th o, n, k 2, th o, k 1 *. 

Second and every alternate even row. — 
Plain. 

Third row. — K 2 ; then knit like first row between 
the stars. 

Fifth row. — K 3 ; repeat first row between the 
stars. 

Knit all the alternate odd rows in the same 
manner, except that at the beginning of each row 
you knit one more stitch than you did in the pre- 
ceding row. In the 23rd row, 12 stitches will be 
knitted before beginning the repetition of the first 
row. There will now, also, be four fancy rows of 
12 holes each. 

Twenty-fourth row. — In working back k 4 ; 
pass the first 3 over the last one knit; then 
knit 4 more, which with the one already on 
the right-hand needle will make 5 stitches on 
this needle. Now pass 4 stitches over the 
last one knit ; knit 5, and pass 5 over the 
last one knit. This will leave 17 on the left- 
hand needle and 1 on the right. Knit back 

plain, and repeat 
from the 1st row 
for all the points. 



Spider Inser- 
tion. 

No. 21. — Cast on 
15 stitches and knit 
- across plain. 

First row. — K 2, 
th o, n, k 1, th 
o, n, k 1, si and b, 
th o, k 1, n, th o, 
k 2. 

Second, Fourth, 
Sixth, and Eighth 
rows. — K 3, p 3, 
k 3, P. 3, k 3. 

Third row. — K 2, 
th o, n, k 1, th o, 
1, n, th o, k 2. 
n, k 2, th o, k 3 to- 



n, k 1, si and 
Fifth row. — 

gether, th o, 

k 2, n, th o, 

k 2. 

Seventh 

roiv. — K 2, 

th o, n, n, 

th o, k 3, 

th o, n, n, 

•th o, k 2. 
N i n t h 

row. — K 2, 

th o, n, k 1, 

tho, n, k 1, 

si and b, th 

o, k 1, n, 

th o, k 2. 
Tenth row. — 
Repeat from 



b, th o, k 
K 2, th o, 




No. 21. — Spider Insertion. 



Same as second and alternate rows, 
first row for all the work. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




No. 22. — Knitted Diamond Edging. 
(Foi r Diamonds). 



Knitted Diamond Edgings. 

Nos. 22 and 23. — For No. 22 cast on 20 stitches. 
The second and every following even row is knitted 
plain except that out of every thread put over twice, 
knit 1, purl 1. 

First row. — Slip 1, k 1, k 2 together, * th o twice, 

k 3 together and 
repeat 3 times 
more from *; th 
o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2. 

Third row. — 
Slip 1, k 2, * th 
o twice, k 3 to- 
gether, and re- 
peat 3 times more 
from * ; th o 
twice, k 2 togeth- 
er, th o twice, k 3. 
Fifth row. — 
Slip 1, k 2, k 3 
together, * th o 
twice, k 3 togeth- 
er and repeat 
twice more from 
*; th o twice, k 
2 together, k 1, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3. 

Seventh row. — Slip 1, k 1, k 2 together, * th o 
twice, k 3 together, and repeat twice more from *; 
th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, th o 
twice, k 3. 

Ninth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, * k 3 together, th o 
twice, and repeat twice more from *; k 2 together, 
k 5, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3. 

Eleventh row. — Slip 1, k 2, k 2 together, * th o 
twice, k 3 together and repeat once more from *; 
th o twice, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 3, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 
together, th o twice, k 3. 

Thirteenth row. — Slip 1, k 1, k 2 together, 
th o twice, k 3 together, th o twice, k 3 to- 
gether, * th o twice, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 
together and repeat twice more from *, th o 
twice, k 3. 

Fifteenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 3 to- 
gether, th o twice, k 3 together, th o twice, 
k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3 
together, th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, k 2 
together, k 3, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3. 

Seventeenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, k 2 together, 
th o twice, k 3 together, th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 5, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3 to- 
gether, k 5, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3. 

Nineteenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 3 to- 
gether, th o twice, k 3 together, th o twice, 
k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 
together, th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, 
th o twice, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together. 

Twenty-first row. — Slip 1, k 1, k 2 together, th o 
twice, k 3 together, th o twice, k 3 together, * th o 
twice, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together and repeat 3 
times more from *. 

Twenty-third rota. — Slip 1, k 2, k 2 together, 



* th o twice, k 3 together and repeat twice more 
from *; th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, 
th o twice, k 3 together, th o twice, k 2 together, 
k 1, k 2 together. 

Twenty-fifth row.— Slip 1, k 2, th o, * k 3 to- 
gether, th o twice and repeat twice more from *; 
k 3 together, k 5, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3 to- 
gether, k 1, k 2 together. 

Twenty-seventh row. — Slip 1, k 1, k 2 together, * 
th o twice, k 3 together and repeat twice more from 
*; th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, th o 
twice, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together. 

Twenty-ninth row. — Slip 1, k 2, k 2 together, * 
th o twice, k 3 together and repeat twice more from 
*; th o twice, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together, th o 
twice, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together. 

Thirty-first row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 3 together, 

* th o twice, k 3 together and repeat 3 times more 
from*; th o twice, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together. 

Thirty-third row. — Slip 1, k 1, k 2 together, * th o 
twice, k 3 together and repeat 4 times more from *; 
k 1, k 2 together. 

Repeat from 3rd row for all the work. 

For No. 23 cast on 32 stitches. Knit the same 
as No. 22, except that the extra stitches are used 
in making an extra row of diamonds (see picture) 
which are knitted on the same plan as the first row. 
Any one accustomed to knitting can make this edg- 
ing after knitting the one seen at No. 22. 

Knitted Diamond Insertion. 

(For Illustration see next Page.) 

No. 24. — Cast on 21 stitches. 

The second and every following row is made plain 
except at the beginning of each, where you slip 1, k 2, 
th o, k 2 together for the heading; at the end knit the 
last 3 stitches as follows: Th o, k 2 together, k 1. 




No. 23.— Knitted Diamond Edging. (Nine Diamonds). 

First row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 4, 
th o, k 3 together, th o, k 6, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Third row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 2, 
k 2 together, th o, k 3, th o, k 2 together, k 4, th o, 
k 2 together, k 1. 

Fifth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 1, 
k 2 together, th o, k 5, th o, k 2 together, k 3, th o, 
1: 2 together, k 1. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



33 



Seventh row. — Slip i, k 2, th o, k 2 together twice, 

th o, k 7, th o, k 2 together, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Ninth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 3 together, th o, 

k 9, th o, k 2 together, k 1, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Eleventh row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 1, 

th o, k 2 together, k 5, k 2 together, th o, k 3, th o, 

k 2 togeth- 
er, k 1. 

Thirteenth 
row. — Slip 
1, k 2, th o, 
k 2 togeth- 
er, k 2, th o, 
k 2 togeth- 
er, k 3, k 2 
together, th 

0, k 4, th o, 
k 2 togeth- 
er, k 1. 

Fifteenth 
row. — Slip 

1, k 2, th o, 
k 2 togeth- 
er, k 3, th 
o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1, 
k 2 togeth- 

k 1. 




No. 24. — Knitted Diamond Insertion. 
(For Directions see this and preceding Page.) 



er, th o, k 5, th o, k 2 together 
Repeat from the first row for all the work 

Fancy Knitted Edging. 
25. — Cast on 19 stitches and knit 



across 



ki, 

th o, 
k3, 



th o twice, p 2 together, 
p 2 together, k 2, th o 
th o twice, p 2 together, 



No 
plain. 

First row. — SI 1, 
th o, p 2 together, 
twice, p 2 together, 
th o, p 2 together. 

Second row. — Th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
gether, k 5, p 1, k 2, th o twice, 
p 2 together, th 0, p 2 togeth- 
er, th o, p 2 together, k 2. 

Third row. — SI x, k 1, th o 
twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 
together, th o, p 2 together, 
k 8, th o twice, p 2 
th o, p 2 together. 

Fourth row. — Th 
together, th o, p 2 
k 8, th o twice, p 2 
th o, p 2 together 
together, k 2. 

Fifth row. — SI 1 
twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, p 2 together, k 2, 
th o twice, p 2 together, th o, 
p 2 together, k 2, th o twice, 
p 2 together, th o, p 2 together. 

Sixth row. — Th 0, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
gether, k 4, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, k 2. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, k 10, th o 
twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together. 

Eighth row. — Th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
3 



gether, k 10, th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 
together, th o, p 2 together, k 2. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, th o, 
p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, k 2, th o twice, 
p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, 
k 2,-th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together. 

Tenth row. — Th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
gether, k 4, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, pi, k 2, th o 
twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 
together, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, k 13, th o 
twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together. 

Twelfth row.- — Th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
gether, k 13, th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, p 2 together, k 2. 

Thirteenth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, k 2, 
th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, th o, 
p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, k 3, th o twice, 
p 2 together, th o, p 2 together. 

Fourteenth row. — Th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 
together, k 5, pi, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, 
th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, th o, 
p 2 together, k 2. 

Fifteenth ro7a. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, k 17, 
th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together. 

Sixteenth row. — Th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
gether, k 17, th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, p 2 together, k 2. 

Seventeenth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, k 17, 
th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together. 

Eighteenth row. — Th o, p 2 together, th o, p 2 
together, k 7 ; pass all the other stitches and loops 
on the right hand needle over last stitch knit, 
leaving but 1 on the right hand needle then k 10, 



together, 

o, p 2 

together, 
together, 
th o, p 2 

k 1, th o 




No. 25. — Fancy Knitted Edging. 



No. 26. — Knitted Straight-Edge Lace. 



th o twice, p 2 together, th o, p 2 together, th o, 
p 2 together, k 2. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 

Knitted Straight-Edge Lace. 

No. 26. — Cast on 32 stitches to begin the work. 
First row. — Knit plain. 



34 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Second row. — Knit 2, thread over twice, purl two 
together; repeat once more. K 2, th o, narrow, * 
th o, n, and repeat from * across the row. 



th o twice, purl 2 



Third row. — K 24 plain, 
together, k2 and repeat once 
more from *. 

Repeat the last 2 rows 
twice more, which will make 
3 upright rows of holes. Knit 
across plain 6 times except 
the heading, which knit the 
same as in 2nd and 3rd rows. 

Now repeat 2nd and 3rd 
rows for the holes, then knit 
across plain 6 times; and so 
on for all the work. 

Fluted Edging. 

No. 27. — This edging is 
very pretty whether made of 
Saxony yam, silk or thread, 
or crochet cotton. It pre- 
sents the appearance of a 
fluted ruffle when properly 
knitted, and is suitable trim- 
ming for any article of wear. 
Cast on 22 stitches. 
First row. — Knit across 
plain. 

Second row. — Knit 16 
stitches, thread over, narrow, 

thread over, narrow, thread over, knit 2 plain. 
Third row. — K 9, purl 11, leave 3 stitches on the 
needle, and then turn for the next row. 

Fourth row. — K 14, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Fifth row. — 
Kio, pi 1, k3. 
Sixth row. 
— K 18, th o, 
n, th o, n, th 
o, k 2. 

Seventh row. 
-i-K 11, p 11, 
leave 3 on 
needle and 
turn for the 
next row. 

Eighth row. 
— Pn, k 5 , th 
o, n, th o, n, 
th o, k 2. 
Ninth row. — Knit across plain. 
Tetith row.— K 3, p 1 1, k 6, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 
Eleventh row. — K 24, leave 3 stitches on the 
needle and turn for the next row. 

Twelfth row. — P 11, k 7, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 
Thirteenth row. — K 1, bind off 6, thus leaving 21 
on the left hand needle. Knit the rest of the row 
plain. 

Repeat from the second row for all the points. 

Antique Edging. 

No. 28. — Cast on 11 stitches. 
First row. — K 9, th o twice, k 2. 




No. 27. — Fluted Edging 




No. 28. — Antique Edging. 



Second row. — K 2 ; k 1 and p 1 out of the put- 
overs, k 9. 

Third row. — K 9, si and b, k 2. 
Fourth row. — K 2, th o twice, k 10. 

Fifth row. — K 6, si and b, 
k 2; k 1 and p 1 out of the 
put-overs, k 2. 

Sixth row. — K 2, si and b, 
k 3, th o twice, k 6. 

Seventh row. — K 6, k 1 
and p 1 out of the put-overs; 
k 4, th o twice, k 2. 

Eighth roiv. — K 2, k 1 
and p 1 out of the put-overs; 
k 4, si and b, k 6. 

Ninth row. — K 4, si and 
b, k 1, si and b, k 2, si and 
b, k 2. 

Tenth row. — K 2, th o 
twice, k 3, th o twice, k 3, 
th o twice, k 4. 

Elevetith row. — K 4; k 1 
and p 1 out of the put-overs, 
k 3; k 1 and p. 1 out of the 
put-overs, k 3; k 1 and p 1 
out of the put-overs; k 2. 

Twelfth row. — K 2, si and 
b, k 3, si and b, k 3, si and 
b, k 4. 

Thirteenth row. — K 6, si 
and b, k 3, n, th o twice, k 2. 
Fourteenth row. — K 2; k 1 and p 1 out of the 
put-overs, n, k 3, th o twice, k 6. 

Fifteenth row. — K 6; k 1 and p 1 out of the put- 
overs; k 2, n, si and b, k 2. 

Sixteenth rinu. — K 2, th o twice, k 4, si and b, k 6. 
Seventeenth row. — K 9, n; k 1 and p 1 out of 
the put-overs; k 2. 

Eighteenth roiv. — K 2, si and b, k 10. 
Nineteenth row. — K 9, n, th o twice, k 2. 
Twentieth row. — K 2; k 1 and p 1 out of the 
put-overs; n, k 8. 

Twenty- first row. — K 9, si and b, k 2. 
Twenty-second row. — K 2, si and b, k 8. 
Repeat from 
first row for 
every scollop. 

Antique In- 
sertion. 

No. 29. — Cast 
on 17 stitches. 

First row. — 
k 2, th o twice, 
n, k 9, n, th o 
twice, k 2. 

Secondrow. — 
K 1, n, p 1, k 
10, n, p 1, k 2. 
Repeat these two rows alternately, twice more. 

Seventh row. — K 2, th o twice, n, k 4, si and b, 
k 3, n, th o twice, k 2. 

Eighth row. — K 1, n, 
p 1, k 2. 




No. 29. — Antique Insertion. 



p 1, k 5, th o twice, k 4, 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



k 2, n, p i, k 



Ninth row. — K 2, th o twice, n, k 4; k 1 and p 1 
out of the put-overs; k 4, n, th o twice, k 2. 

Tenth row. — K 1, n, pi, k 3, * si and b, and 
repeat twice more from *; 

Eleventh row. — K 2, th o 
twice, n, k 2, th o twice, 
k 3, th o twice, k 2, n, th o 
twice, k 2. 

Twelfth row. — K 1, n, pi, 
* k 3; k 1 and p 1 out of the 
put-overs and repeat from * 
once more; k 2, n, p 1, k 2. 

Thirteenth rmv. — K 2, th 
o twice, n, k 2, si and b, si 
and b, k 1, si and b, k 2, n, 
th o twice, k 2. 

Fourteenth row. — K 1, n, 
p 1, k 5, th o twice, k 4, n, 
p 1, k 2. 

Fifteenth row. — K 2, th o 
twice, n, k 4; k 1 and p 1 
out of the put-overs; k 4, n, 
th o twice, k 2. 

Sixteenth row. — K 1, n, p 1, 
k 5, si and b, k 4, n, p 1, k 2. 

Repeat from first row. 



Knitted 



Antique-Wheel 
Lace. 




No. 30. — Cast on 31 
stitches. 

First row. — K 2, th o, n, 
k 1, th o, n, k 4, n, th o twice, n, k 5, th o, n, k 1, 
th o, n, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Second row. — K 11, th o, n, k 4, th o twice, n, 
n, th o twice, n, knit the rest plain. 

Third row. — K 2, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 4, seam 
1, k 3, seam 1, k 5, th o, n, k 2, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Fourth row. — K 12, th o, n, k 5, n, th o twice, 
n, k 11. 

Fifth row. — K 2, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 6, seam 

1, k 7, th o, 
n, k 3, tho, 
n, th o, n, 
th o, n, th 
o, k 2. 

Sixth 
row. — K 
13, th o, n, 
k 5, th o 
twice, n, n, 
th o twice, 
n, knit the 
rest plain. 

Seventh 

row. — K 2, 

th o, n, k 1, 

th o, n, k 4, 

seam 1, k 3, 

seam 1, k 6, th o, n, k 4, th o, n, th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Eighth row. — K 14, th o, n, k 6, n, th o twice, n; 

knit the rest plain. 

Ninth row. — K 2, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 6; drop 



No. 30. — Knitted Antique-Wheel Lace. 



the put-over thread, n, k 6, th o, n, k 5, th o, n, 
th o, n, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Tenth row. — K 15, th o, n, knit the rest plain. 
Eleve?ith row. — K 2, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 13, 
th o, n, k 14. 

Twelfth row. — Slip 1, 
bind off 5, k 9, th o, n; knit 
the rest plain. 

Repeat these details for 
all the work. 

Knitted Lace. 

No. 31. — This engraving 
shows a pretty pattern of 
lace that may be knitted 
with thread, crochet cotton, 
Saxony yarn or silk. 

Cast on 16 stitches. 

First row. — Knit 3, thread 
over, narrow, thread over, 
narrow, knit 5, narrow, 
thread over, knit 1, thread 
over, knit 1. 

Second, Fourth, Sixth, 
Eighth and Tenth rows. — 
Knit plain. 

Third row. — Knit 4, th o, 
n, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, k 3, 
th o, k 1. 

Fifth row. — K 5, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 1, n, th o, k 5, 
th o, k 1. 
th o, n, th o, k 3 together, 



th o. 



th o, 




No. 31. — Knitted Lace. 



Seventh row. — K 6, 
th o, n, k 5, th o, k 1. 

Ninth row. — K 5, th 
n, k 5, th o, k 1. 

Eleventh row. — 
K 4, th o, n, th o, 
n, k 4, th o, n, k 5, 
th o, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — 
Cast off 5 and 
knit 15. 

Repeat for all 
the points. 

Spider Edging. 

No. 32. — Cast 
on 15 stitches and 
knit across plain. 

First row. — 
Knit 2, th o, k 1, 
si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over,- k 1 
o twice, n, k 2. 

Second rmv. — Th o, p 2 
k 11. 

Third row. — K 2, th o, k 1 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 2, n, 
twice, k 3. 

Fourth row. — Th o, p 2 together, k 2, p 1, n, k 1, 
p 1, k 10. 

Fifth row. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n,' pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 2, n, th o twice, n, k 2, th o 
twice, k 3. 




No. 32. — Spider Edging. 

th o, k 4, 
together, k 2, p 



th 



, si 1, n, pass slipped 
th o twice, k 2, th o 



36 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Sixth row. — Th o, p 2 together, n, p 1, k 2, n, 
p 1, n, k 8. 

Seventh row. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 3, th o twice, n, n, th o 
twice, k 3. 

Eighth row. — Th o, p 2 together, n, p 1, n, k 1, 
p 1, n, k 8. 

Ni?ith row. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 4, th o twice, n, th o twice, 

Te?ith row. — Th o, p 2 together, n, p 1, n, p 1, n, 
k 9 . 

Eleventh row. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 5, th o twice, n, k 2. 
Twelfth row. — Th o, p 2 together, n, p 1, n, k 10. 

Repeat from 1st row. 

Knitted Edging. 

No. 33. — Cast on 30 stitches. 

First row. — Slip i,knit 2, th o, k 2 together, k 3, 
k 2 together, * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and 
repeat 3 times more from 
s ; th o twice, k 4. 

Second, Fourth, Sixth, 
Eighth, Tenth, Four- 
teenth, Sixteenth, Twen- 
tieth, Twenty-second, 
Twenty-fourth, Twenty- 
jixth, Twenty-eighth and 
Thirtieth rows. — Knit 
plain, except that you 
knit 1 and purl 1 out of 
every 2 put-overs, and at 
the end or last 3 stitches 
(working back), th o, k 
2 together, k 1. 

Third row. — Slip 1, k 
2, th o, k 2 together, k 4, 
k 2 together, * th o twice, 
it 2 together twice and 
repeat 3 times more from 
*; th o twice, knit 4. 

Fifth row. — Slip 1, k 2, 
th o, k 2 together, k 5, k 2 together * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice; repeat 3 times more from *; 
th o twice, k 4. 

Seventh row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 6, 
k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice; re- 
peat 3 times more from *; th o twice, k 4. 

Ninth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 7, 
Ic 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice and 
repeat 3 times more from *; th o twice, k 4. 

Eleventh row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 8, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together 
twice; repeat 3 times more from *; th o twice, 
k 4 . 

Twelfth row. — Slip 1, k 3, * k 1, p 1, k 2, and re- 
peat 3 times more from *; k 1, p 1, k 1, k 2 to- 
gether, th o twice, slip 1, k 2 together, pass slipped 
stitch over, th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, th o, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Thirteenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, k 2 together; * th o twice, 




No. 33. — Knitted Edging. 



k 2 together twice and repeat 3 times more from 
*; th o twice, k 4. 

Fifteenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 1, th o twice, * slip 1, k 2 together, pass slipped 
stitch over, th o twice; repeat twice more from *; 
k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 
together twice and repeat 3 times more from last *; 
th o twice, k 4. 

Seventeenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 9, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice; 
repeat 3 times more from *.; th o twice, k 2 together, 
k 4 . 

Eighteenth row. — Slip 1, cast off 1, k 3, *; k 1, 
p 1, k 2 and repeat 4 times more from *; k 2 to- 
gether, th o twice, slip 1, k 2 together, pass slipped 
stitch over, th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, th o, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Nineteenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 1, k 2 together, * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and repeat 3 times more from 

*; th o twice, k 2 togeth- 
er, k 4. 

Twenty-first row. — Slip 
1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 7, k 2 together, * th o 
twice, k 2 together twice 
and repeat 3 times more 
from *; th o twice, k 3 
together, k 4. 

Twenty-third row. — Slip 
1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 6, k 2 together, * th o 
twice, k 2 together twice 
and repeat 3 times more 
from *; th o twice, k 3 
together, k 4. 

Twenty-fifth row. — Slip 
1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 5, k 2 together *, th o 
twice, k 2 together twice 
and repeat 3 times more 
from *; th o twice, k 3 
together, k 4. 

Twenty- seventh row. — 



together, k 4, k 2 to- 
together twice, and re- 
th o twice, k 3 together, 



Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 
gether; * th o twice, k 
peat 3 times more from 

Twenty-ninth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k3, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice 
and repeat 3 times more from *; th o twice, k 3 to- 
gether, k 4. Knit back as in other rows, except 
that you knit the 2nd and 3rd stitches together in 
order to narrow. 

Repeat from the 3rd row for all of the work. 

Knitted Insertion. 

(For Illustration see next Page.) 

No. 34. — Cast on 35 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 3, 
k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice and 
repeat once more from *; th o twice, k 2 together, 
k 1, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3 together, th o twice, 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



3T 



k 3 together, th o twice, k 2 together, k 1, th o once, 
k 2 together, k 1. 

Second and every following even row not 
described. — The first 4 stitches of each of these 
rows are knit as follows: Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 
together. The last 3 as follows: Th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. Knit the rest plain, knitting one-half 
and purling the other half of each thread put 
over twice. 

Third row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 4, 
k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice and re- 
peat once more from *; th o twice, k 2 together, 
k n, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Fourth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 1, 
k 2 together, th o twice, k 3 together, th o twice, 
k 2 together, * k 3, p 1 and repeat twice more from 
*; k 7, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Fifth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 5, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together 
twice and repeat once more from *; th o twice, 
k 2 together, k 2, p 1, 
k 2, p 1 ; k 4, th 

0, k 2 together, k 1. 
Sixth row. — Like the 

second. 

Seventh row. — Slip 

1, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 6, k 2 to- 
gether, * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and 
repeat once more from 
*; th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 9, th o, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Eighth row. — Like 
second. 

Ninth row. — Slip 1, 
k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 7, k 2 together, * th 
o twice, k 2 together 
twice and repeat once 
more from *; th o 
twice, k 2 together, k 8, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Tenth row. — Like second. 

Eleventh row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 8, k 2 together; * th o twice, k 2 together twice 
and repeat once more from *; th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 7, th 0, k 2 together, k 1, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 6,'k 1, p 1, * k 3, pi and repeat once more 
from *; k 1, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3 to- 
gether, th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, th o, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Thirteenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, k 2 together; * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and repeat once more from 
*; th o twice, k 2 together, k 6, th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Fourteenth row. — Like second row. 

Fifteenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 3 together, * 
th o twice, k 3 together and repeat once more from 
*; th o twice, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together; * th o, 
twice, k 2 together twice and repeat once more from 




No. 34. — Knitted Insertion'. 
(For Pirections see this and preceding Page.) 



last *; th o twice, k 2 together, k 5, th 0, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Sixteenth row. — Like second. 
Seventeenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 9, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice 
and repeat once more from last *; th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 6, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Eighteenth row.— Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k5, ki, pi, *k3, pi and repeat from * once 
more; k 2, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3 together, 
th o twice, k 2 together, k 3, th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Nineteenth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 1, k 2 together, * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and repeat once more from last 
*; th o twice, k 2 together, k 7, th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Ttventieih row. — Like second. 
Twenty-first row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 7, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice 

and repeat once more 
from last *; th o twice, 
k 2 together, k 8, 
th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Twenty-second row. 
— Like second. 

Twenty-third row. — 
Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 
together, k 6, k 2 to- 
gether, th o twice, k 
2 together twice, and 
repeat once more from 
*; th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 9, th o, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Twenty-fourth rem.'. 
— Like second. 

Twenty-fifth row. — 
Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 
together, k 5, k 2 to- 
gether, * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and repeat once more from 
*; th o twice, k 2 together, k 10, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Twenty-sixth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1, k 2 together, th o twice, k 3 to- 
gether, th o twice, k 2 together, k 2, p 1, * k 3, 
p 1 and repeat once more from *; k 8, th o, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Twenty-seventh row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 4, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together 
twice and repeat once more from *; th o twice, k 2 
together, k 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 4, th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Twenty-eighth row. — Like second. 
Twenty-ninth row. — Slip i,k 2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice 
and repeat once more from *; th o twice, k 3 to- 
gether, th o twice, k 3 together; th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 
Thirtieth row. — Like second. 
Repeat from 3rd row for all the rest of the 
work. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Open-Work Diamond Edging. 

No. 35. — Cast on 19 stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — K 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 6, n, th o, 
k 3, th o, k 2. 

Second row. — K 2, th o, k 5, th o, n, k 6, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Third row. — K 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 4, n, th o, 
k 1, n, th o, k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o, k 2. 

Fourth row. — K 2, th o, k 1, n, th o, k 3, th o, n, 
k 1, th o, n, k 4, th o, n, th o, n, k 1. 

Fifth row. — K 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 2, n, th o, 
k 1, n, th o, k 5, th o, n, k 1, th o, k 2. 

Sixth row. — K 2, th o, k 1, n, th o, k 3, th 
o, n, k 2, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 2, th o, n, th o, 
n, k 1. 

Seventh row. — K 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 3, th 
o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, k 1, n, th o, 
k 1, n. 

Eighth row. — Cast off 1, k 1, th o, n, k 1, 
th o, n, k 1, n, th o, k 1, n, th o, k 5, th o, n, th o, 
n, k 1. 

Ninth rmv. — K 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 5, th 

o, n, k 1, th 

0, si 1, n, 
pass slip- 
ped stitch 
over, th o, 
k 1, n, k 

1, n. 
Ten t h 

row.—K. 2, 
th o, n, k 
3, n, th o, 
k 7, th o, 
n, th o, n, 
k 1. 

Eleventh 
row. — K 2, 
th o, n, th 
o, n, k 7, th 
o, n, k 1, n, 
th o, k 3. 

Twelfth row. — Cast off 2, k 1, th o, k 3 together, 
th o, k 9, th o, n, th o, n, k 1. 

Repeat all these details for every scollop. 

Knitted Torchon Lace. 

No. 36. — In this instance this lace is made of 
Saxony yarn, but cotton, linen or silk may be used 
for the same pattern. 

Cast on 15 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1 k 2, th o, narrow, k 3, th o, 
k 1. th o, k 6. 

Second row.- — Slip 1, k 5, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 3, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Third row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, n, n, th o, k 5, th o, 
k6. 

Fourth row. — Bind off 4, k 1, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, 
n, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Fifth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1, 
n, th o, k 3. 



Sixth row. — Slip 1, k 2, th o, k 1, th o, slip 2, k 1 ; 
pass the two slipped stitches over the knitted one; 
th o, k 4, th o, n, k 1. 

Repeat from first row. 

Knitted Narrow Edging. 

^°- 37- — Cast on 12 stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — Knit 2, th o twice, seam 2 together, 





No. 35. — Open-Wore Diamond 
Edging. 



No. 36. — Knitted Torchon Lace. 



knit 2, th o 'twice, n, k 1, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Second row. — K 3, seam 1, k 3, seam 1, k 2, th o 
twice, seam 2 together, k 2. 

Third ro7v. — K 2, th o twice, seam 2 together, 
k ic. 

Fourth rcnv. — K 1, bind off 2 (which will leave n 
on the left-hand needle), k 7, th o twice, seam 2 
together, k 2. Repeat from first row. 

Knitted Lace. 

(No Illustration.) 

Cast on 7 stitches and knit across plain. 
First row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o twice, k 2. 
Second row. — Th o, p 2 together, k 1, pi, k 2, 
th o, n, k 1. 




No. 37. — Knitted Narrow Edging. 



Third row. — SI i,ki, th o, n, k 5. 
Fourth row.— -Th o, p 2 together, k 4, th o, 
n, k 1. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o, n, k 5. 
Sixth row. — Bind off 3, k 3, th o, n, k 1. 
Repeat from first row. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



39 



Open-Point Edging. 

No. 38. — This edging may be made of knitting 
silk or of cotton or linen. Belding's knitting silk 
in any tint preferred makes a pretty effect. 
Cast on 24 stitches and purl across. 
First row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 11, th o, n, k 1, 

th o, n, th o 
twice, n,ki. 
S e c ond 
row. — K 3, 
P 1, k 5, 
th around 
the needle, 
p 2 togeth- 
er, p ro, k 
1, th o, n, 
k 1. 

Third 
row. — SI 1, 
k 2, th o, n, 
k 1; th o 
and n, 4 



No. 38. — Open-Point Edging. 



times; k 2, th o, n, k 2, th o,«n, th o twice, 
n, k 1. 

Fourth row. — K 3, p 1, k 6, th around the 
needle, p 2 together, p 10, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 
Fifth row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 11, th o, 
n, k 3, th o, n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Sixth row. — K 3, p 1, k 7, th around the 
needle, p 2 together, p 10, k 1, th o, n, 
k 1. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 1 ; th o 
and n, 4 times; k 2, th o, n, k 4, th o, n, th o 
twice, n, k 1. 

Eighth row. — K 3, p 1, k 8, th around the 

needle, p 2 
together, p 
10, k 1, th 
o, n, k 1. 

Ninth row. — 
SI 1, k 2, th o, 
n, k 11, th o, n, 
k 5, th o, n, th 
o twice, n, k 1. 
Tenth row. — K 

3, P 1. k 9, 
th around the 
needle, p 2 to- 
gether, p 10, k 1, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Eleventh row. 
— SI 1, k 2, th o, 
n, k 11, th o, n, k 6, th o, n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — K 3, p 1, k 10, th around the 
needle, p 2 together, p 10, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Thirteenth row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 11, th o, n, 
k 12. 

Fourteenth row. — Bind off 6, k 7, th around the 




No. 39. — Open-Work Edging. 



needle, p 2 together, p 10, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 
Repeat from first row for all of the work. 

Open-Work Edging. 

No. 39. — Cast on 16 stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — Knit 3, th o, n, k 2, th o, n, k 1, th o 
twice, n, th o twice, n, th o twice, n. 

Second row. — K 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, 
P 1, k 3, p 1, k 3. 

Third row. — K 3, th o, n, k 2, th o, n, 
k 10. 

Fourth row. — Cast off 3, k 7, pi, k 3, p 1, k 3. 

Repeat from first row. 

Knitted Insertion: Peacock's-Eye 
Pattern. 

No. 40. — Cast on 27 stitches. 
First row. — Knit 3, th o, k 2 together, k 18, th o, 
k 2 together, k 2. 

Second row. — K 3, th o, k 2 together, pi, k2 




No. 40. — Knitted Insertion: Peacock's-Eye Pattern. 



together, k 5, th o 7 times, k 5, k 2 together, p 1, 
k 2, th o, k 2 together, k 2. 

Third row. — K 3, th o, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 to- 
gether, p 4; knit 7 out of the back; p 4, p 2 to- 
gether, k 3, th o, k 2 together, k 2. 

Fourth row. — K 3, th o, k 2 together, p 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 3; * th o, k 1, and repeat 6 times more 
from *; k 3, k 2 together, p 1, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2. 

Fifth row. — K 3, th o, k 1, p 2 together, p 18, 
p 2 together, k 3, th o, k 2 together, k 2. 

Sixth row. — K 3, th o, k 2 together, p 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 16, k 2 together, p 1, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2. 

Seventh row. — K 3, th o, k 2 together, p 1, p 2 to- 
gether, p 14, p 2 together, k 3, th o, k 2 together, k 2. 

Eighth row. — K 3, th o, k 2 together, p 1, p 2 to- 
gether, p 12, p 2 together, p 1, k 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2 and repeat from 1st row. 



40 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Narrow Torchon Edging. 

No. 41. — Cast on 9 stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — K 3, n, th o, n, th o, k 1, th o, k 1. 

Second and 
every alter- 
nate row. — 
Plain. 

Third row. 
— K 2, n, th 
o, n, th o, 
k 3, th o, 
k 1. 

Fifth row. 
— K 1, n, th 
o, n, th o, 

k 5» th °» 
k 1. 
th o, n, k 1, n, 




No. 41. — Narrow Torchon Edging. 



Seventh row. — K 3, th o, 
th o, n. 

Ninth row. — K 4, th o, n, th o, k 3 together, 
th o, n. 

Eleventh row. — K 5, th o, k 3 together, th o, n. 

Twelfth row. — Plain. Repeat from first row for 
all the details. 

Knitted Edging. 

No. 42. — For this edging use linen thread and fine 
steel needles. Cast on 7 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1, inserting the needle from the 
back of the stitch below the working thread; k 6. 

Second row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
p 2, k 1. 

Third row. — Slip 1, k 3; out of the 2 put-overs 

k 1 and k 1 
crossed (to 
knit cross- 
ed, insert 
the needle 
from the 
back down- 
ward); k 2. 
Fourth 
row. — Slip 

1, k 2, th o 
twice, p 2 
together, p 

2, k 1. 
Fifth row. — Slip 1, k 3; out of the two put- 
overs k 1 and k 1 crossed; k 3. 

Sixth row. — Slip 1, k 4, th o twice, p 2 together, k2. 

Seventh row. — Slip 1, k 2; out of the put-overs, 
k 1 and p 1; k 5. 

Eighth row. — Cast off 3, inserting the needle as 
for purling instead of knitting; k 6. Repeat from 
1st row for all of the details. 

Pointed Fluted Edging. 

No. 43. — Cast on 21 stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — K 3, th o, n, k 10, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o twice, n. 

Second row. — K 2, p 1, k 4, p 10, k 1, th o, n, k 2. 




No. 42. — Knitted Edging. 



Third row. — K 3, th o, n, k 1, * th o, n, and 
repeat 3 times more from *; k 1, th o, n, k 1, th o, 
n, th o twice, n. 

Fourth row. — K 2, p 1, k 5, p 10, k 1, th o, n, k 2. 

Fifth rcnv. — K 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 4, th o, 
n, k 1, th o, n, k 2, th o, n, th o twice, n. 

Sixth row. — K 2, p 1, k 6, p 10, k 1, th o, n, k 2. 

Seventh roiv. — K 3, th o, n,'ki, * th o, n, and 
repeat 3 times more from *; k 1, th o, n, k 3, th o, 
n, th o twice, n. 

Eighth row. — K 2, p 1, k 7, p 10, k 1, th o twice, 
n, k 2. 

Ninth row. — K 3, th o, n, k 3 io, th o, n, k 4, th o, 
n, th o twice, n. 

Tenth row. — K 2, p 1, k 19, th o, n, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — K 3, th o, n, p 10; leave thread 




No. 43. — Pointed Fluted Edging. 



at back of needle to serve as th o; n, k 5, th o, n, 
th o twice, n. 

Twelfth J-07V. — K 2, p 1, k 20, th o, n, k 2. 

Thirteenth row. — K 3, th o, n, p 10; leave thread 
as in nth row; n, k 6, th o, n, th o twice, n. 

Fourteenth row. — Bind off 7, leaving 20 stitches on 
the left-hand needle; k 16, th o, n, k 2. In binding 
off, drop the 2nd loop of the two put-over threads. 

Repeat from first 
row for the next and 
following points. 

Narrow Edging. 

No. 44. — Cast on 11 
stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — K 3, th 
o, si and b, k 1, th o, si 
and b, k 1, th o twice, 
k 1, th o twice, k 1. 

Second row. — K 2, 
p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, 
p 1. k 2, p 1, k 3. 

Third row. — K 3, th o, si and b, k 1, th o, si and 
b, k 7. 

Fourth row. — Cast off 4, k 3 p, 1, k 2, p 1, k 3. 

Repeat from first row. 




No. 44. — Narrow Edging. 



THE ART OF KXITTING. 



41 



Knitted Insertion. 

No. 45. — Cast on 13 stitches and knit across plain. 
First row. — SI 1, k 3, n, th o, k 1, th o, n, k 4. • 
Second and every alternate row. — -Plain. 

Third row. — 
SI 1, k 2, n, th o, 
k 3, th o, n, k 3. 
Fifth row. — SI 
1, k 1, n, th o, k 
5, th o, n, k 2. 

Seventh row. 
—SI 1, k 3, th o, 
n, k 1, n, th o, 
k 4 . 

Ninth row. — 

SI 1, k 4, th o, k 3 

together, tho, k 5. 

Repeat from beginning. 




No. 45. — Knitted Insertion. 



Tenth row. — Plain. 



Narrow Pointed 
46. — Cast on 7 stitches. 

k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 




No. 46. — Narrow Pointed Edging. 



Edging. 

No. 

First row. — SI 1, 
together, th o twice, k 2 together. 

Second row. — SI 1; k 1 and p 1 alternately out 
of each double put-over, knitting the rest plain. 
Third roiv. — SI 1, k 2 together, th o twice, k 

2 together, 
k 1, th o 
twice, k 2 
together. 

Fourth 
row. — SI 1, 
k 1, p 1, 

k 3, P 1, 
k 2. 

Fifth 
row. — SI 1, 
k 2 togeth- 
er, th o 
twice, k 2 together, k 2, th o twice, k 2 together. 
Sixth row. — SI 1, k 1, p 1, k 4, p 1. k 2. 
Seventh row. — SI 1, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 
together, k 3, th o twice, k 2 together. 
Eighth row. — SI 1, k 1, p 1, k 5, p 1, k 2. 
Ninth row. — SI 1, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 
together, k 1, th o 3 times, k 2 together, k 1, th o 
twice, k 2 together. 

Tenth row. — SI 1, k 1, p 1, k 3; p 1 and k 1 out 
of the rest of the put-overs; k 3, p 1, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — SI 1, k 2 together, th o twice, 
k 2 together, k 7, th o twice, k 2 together. 

Twelfth row. — Cast off 9, leaving 6 on the left- 
hand needle, k 3, p 1, k 2. Repeat from 1st row. 

Wide Pointed Edging. 

No. 47. — Cast on 30 stitches and knit across plain. 

First row. — Knit 2, th o twice, purl 2 together, 
k 2, th o twice, purl 2 together, k 1, * th o, narrow, 
and repeat from * to within 1 stitch from the end; 
then th o, k 1, which will complete n holes. 

Second row. — Knit plain to within 8 stitches 
from the end; then th o twice, purl 2 together, k 2, 
th o twice, purl 2 together, k 2; these last 8 



stitches will form the fagoting or heading. 

Repeat these two rows, increasing 1 stitch be- 
tween the fagoting and the holes in every row 
worked toward the lower edge, until there are 17 
rows, or 9 stitches, between the fagoting and 
open work, and 9 holes. This will bring you to the 
middle of the first point. 

In working toward the top (18th row), begin to 
narrow for the other half of the point in the fol- 
lowing manner: Knit 3 stitches together; knit 
plain to fagoting and knit latter as before. 

Begin every row worked toward the top by knit- 




No. 47. — Wide Pointed Kduing. 



ting 3 together as in 18th row; and in every row 
worked downward increase by 1 plain stitch be- 
tween the fagoting and holes as before, until there 
are 15 plain stitches between the fagoting and open 
work, or 4 holes below them after working back. 
Then, begin at the top, and repeat from the first 
row, except that at the end of this row knit the two 
stitches left after putting the thread over, together. 

Knitted Torchon Lace. 
No. 48. — Cast on 15 stitches and knit across plain. 
First row. — K 3, 



th 



th o, n, k 3, 
k 1, th c, k 6. 

Second row. — K 
6, th o, k 3, th o, n, 
k 3, th o, n, k 1. 

Third row. — K 3, 
th o, n, n, th o, k 5, 
th o,-k 6. 

Fourth row. — 
Cast off 4, k 1, th o, 
n, k 3, n, th o, n, k 
1, th o, n, k 1. 

Fifth row. — K 3, 
th o, n, k 1, th o, n, 
k 1, n, th o, k 3. 

Sixth row. — K 3, 
th o, k 1, th o, si 2, k 1; pass the slipped stitches 
over the knitted one; th o, k 4, th o, n, k 1. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 




No. 48. — Knitted Torchon Lace. 



42 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Lattice Edginc. 

No. 49. — Cast on 21 stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — K 3, th o, n, th o, n, k 2; k 8 put- 
ting thread over 4 
times for each in- 
stead of once as in 
ordinary knitting; 
k 2, th o 4 times, 
k 2. 

Second row. — K 2, 
then out of the 4 
put-overs, k 1, pi, 
k 1, pi; then k 2; 
now slip the first 4 
put-overs off as 1 
stitch; slip each of 
the following 7 in 
the same way; this 
will make 8 long 
stitches on the right 
hand needle. With 
the left hand needle 
lift or pass the first 
4 of these long loops 
over the second 4, and then keeping them on the 
left hand needle also slip the second 4 onto this 
needle. This will cross the loops and leave them 
on the left hand needle. Now knit them off in 
the order in which they are now arranged — that is, 
knitting the second 4 first, and the first 4 last; then 
k 3, th o, n, th o, n, k 2. 

Third row. — K 3, th o, n, th o, n, k 18. 
Fourth row. — K 19, th o, n, th o, n, k 2. 
Fifth row. — K 3, th o, n, th o, n, k 18. 




First row. — Knit 3, thread over and knit 3 to- 
gether, thread over, knit 3 plain, thread over, nar- 
row, thread over twice, narrow, thread over twice, 
narrow. 

Second row. — Thread over, knit 2, purl 1, knit 2, 
purl 1, knit 2, thread over, narrow, knit 7. 

Third row. — Knit 3, thread over, narrow, 
thread over, narrow, purl 1, narrow, thread over, 
knit 8. 

Fourth row. — Knit 1, bind off 3, knit 4, purl 6, 
knit 1, thread over, narrow, knit 1. 

Fifth row. — Knit 3, thread over, narrow, knit 1, 



No. 49. — Lattice Edging. 




No. 50. — Knitted Spider-Web Lace. 

Sixth row. — Cast off 4, k 14, th o, n, th o, n, k 2. 
Repeat from first row for all the work. 

Knitted Spider-Web Lace. 

No. 50. — Cast on 15 stitches, and knit across 
plain. 




No. 51. — Knitted Edging. 



thread over, knit 3 together, thread over, 
knit 2 plain, thread over twice, narrow, 
thread over twice, narrow. 

Sixth row. — Thread over, knit 2, purl 
1, knit 2, purl 1, knit 1, purl 6, knit 1, 
thread over, narrow, knit 1. 

Seventh row. — Knit 3, thread over, nar- 
row, narrow, thread over, knit 1, thread 
over, narrow, knit 8. 

Eighth row. — Same as fourth. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 

Knitted Edginc. 

No. 51. — Cast on 15 stitches. 
First row. — Knit 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, 
n, k 1, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, th o 
twice, n. 

Second row. — K 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, 
k 2, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 2. 
Third row. — K 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1 ; k 
rest plain. 

Fourth row. — K 11, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 2, 
Fifth row. — K 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1; k rest 
plain. 

Sixth row. — Cast off 3, k 7, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, 
k 2; repeat from the first row for all the points. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



43 



No. 52. — Cast 
plain. 

First row. — SI 



Leaf Edging. 

on 19 stitches and knit across 



th o 




52. — Leaf Edging. 



twice, p 2 together, 
k 1, th 0, k 1, si 
1, n,. pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, 
th o, k 1, th o 
twice, p 2 togeth- 
er, k 1, th o 
twice, n, th o 
twice, n, k 1. 

Second row. — 
K 3, p 1, k 2, p 
1, k 1, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 7, 
th o twice, p 2 
together, k 2. 

Third row. — 
SI 1, k i, th o 
twice, p 2 togeth- 
er, k 1, th o, k 1, 
si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 1, th o 
twice, p 2 together, k 3, th o twice, n, th o twice, 
n, k 1. 

Fourth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 3, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 7, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 1, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, 
th o, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, k 5, th o twice, 
n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Sixth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 5, th o twice, p 2, 
together, k 7, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Seventh row. — SI i,ki, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 1, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, 
th o, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, k 7, th o twice, 
n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Eighth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 7, th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 7, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 




No. 53. — Knitted Lace. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 1, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, 
th o, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, k 9, th o twice, 
n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Tenth row. — Cast off 10, k 5, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 7, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2 and repeat 
from first row for all the work. 



Knitted Lace. 

No. 53. — Cast on 12 stitches and knit across plain. 

First row. — K 1, th o, n, th o, n, th o, n, k 3, 
th o twice, n. 

Second row. — K 2, p 1, and knit rest of row plain. 

Third row. — K 6, th o, n, k 5. 

Fourth row. — Knit plain. 

Fifth row. — K 1, th o, n, th o, n, k 2, th o, n, 
k 2, th o, twice, n. 

Sixth row. — K 2, p 1, knit the rest plain. 

Seventh row. — K 8, th o, n, k 4. 

Eighth row. — Knit plain. 

Ninth row. — K 1, th o, n, th o, n, k 4, th o, n, 
k 1, th o twice, n. 

Tenth row. — K 2, p 1, knit the rest plain. 

Eleventh row. — K 10, th o, n, k 3. 

Twelfth row. — Bind off 3; this will leave 11 on 



tsMidll \A- C.), J 



No. 54. — Deep Lattice Edging. 

the left-hand needle which knit plain, and repeat 
from first row. 

Deep Lattice Edging. 

No. 54. — Use Belding's silk or cotton, and fine 
knitting needles. 

Cast on 25 stitches and knit across twice plain. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 3; th o and n, 9 times; th o 
twice, n, k 1. 

Fourth row. — K 3, p 1, k 22. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 4; th o and n, 9 times; th o 
twice, n, k 1. 

Sixth row. — K 3, p 1, k 23. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 5; th o and n, 9 times; th o 
twice and n, k 1. 

Eighth row. — K 3, p 1, k 24. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 27. 

Tenth row. — Plain. 

Eleventh row. — Slip 1, k 27. 

Twelfth row. — Bind off 3, k 24. 

Repeat from first row. 



44 



THE ART OF KNITTING 



Diagonal Edging. 

No. 55. — This lace may be made of Belding's 
knitting silk, or of crochet silk or cotton. 

Cast on 22 stitches and purl across. 

First row. — SI 1, n, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 5, th o, 
k 3 together, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Second row. — Th o, n, p 21. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, si 1, n, pass slipped 




3- 



th o, 
th o, 



k 

th 



No. 55. — Diagonal Edging. 



stitch over, th o, k 6, th o, k 3 together, k 1, th o, 
k 3, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Fourth row. — Th o, n, p 22. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, n, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 3, th o, 
k 3, together, k 1, th o, k 5, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Sixth row. — Th o, n, p 23. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, sl 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, th o, k 4, th o, k 3 together, k 1, th o, 
k 7, th o, n, th o, k 2. 

Eighth row. — Th o, n, p 24. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, n, th o, k 
th o, k 3 together, k 1, th o, k 
k 2. 

Tenth row. — Th o, n, p 25. 

Eleventh row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, sl 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, th o, k 12, th o, k 3 together, k 1, th o, 
n, th o, n, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — Th o, n, p 24. 

Thirteenth row. — Sl 1, n, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 9, 
th o, k 3 together, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, k 1. 

Fourteenth row. — Th o, n, p 23. 

Fifteenth row. — Sl 1, k 2, th o, sl 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, th o, k 10, th o, k 3 together, k 1, th o, 
n, th o, n, k 1. 

Sixteenth row. — Th o, n, p 22. 

Seventeenth row. — Sl 1, n, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 7, 
th o, k 3 together, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, k 1. 

Eightce7ith row. — Th o, n, p 21. 

Nineteenth row. — Sl 1, k 2, th o, sl 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, th o, k 8, th o, k 3 together, k 1, 
th o, n, th o, n, k 1. 

Twentieth row. — Th o, n, p 20. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 



Knitted Normandy Lace. 

No. 56. — Cast on 22 stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First rmv. — Knit 3, thread over, n, k 3, thread 
over, k 3 together, thread over, k 3, thread over, 
k 3 together, thread over, k 3, thread over, knit 2. 

Second row. — Thread over, n, thread over, k 5, 
thread over, k 1, thread over, k 5, thread over, k 1, 
thread over, k 6, thread over, n, k 1. 

Third row. — K 3, thread over, n, k 7, n, thread 
over, k 1, thread over, n, k 3, n, thread over, k 1, 
thread over, n, k 1, th o, k 2. 

Fourth row. — Thread over, n, thread over, k 1, 
n, thread over, k 3, thread over, n, k 1, n, thread 
over, k 3, thread over, n, k 8, thread over, n, k 1. 

Fifth row. — K 3, thread over, n, k 7, thread 
over, n, k 1, n, thread over, k 3 together, thread 
over, n, k 1, n, thread over, n, k 1, thread over, k 2. 

Sixth row. — Thread over, n, k 1, slip the second 
stitch on the right-hand needle over the last one, 
thread over, n, k 1, thread over, k 3 together, 
thread over, k 3, thread over, k 3 together, thread 
over, k 10, thread over, n, k 1. 

Seventh row. — K 3, thread over, n, k 9, thread 
over, k 1, thread over, k 5, thread over, k 1, thread 
over, k 1, n, thread over, k 1, n. 

Eighth row. — Thread over, n, k 1, slip the second 
stitch over the last, thread over, n, k 3, n, thread 
over, k i, thread over, n, k 3, n, thread over, k 3 
together, thread over, k 6, thread over, n, k 1. 

Ninth row. — K 3, thread over, n, k 2, n, thread 
over, k 3, thread over, n, k 1, n, thread over, k 3, 
thread over, n, k 1, n, thread over, k 1, n. 




No. 56. — Knitted Normandy Lace. 



Tenth row. — Thread over, n, k 1, slip the secord 
stitch over the last, thread over, k 3 together, 
thread over, n, k 1, n, thread over, k 3 together, 
thread over, n, k 1, n, thread over, n, k 3, thread 
over, n, k 1. 

Repeat from first row. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



45 



Diamond Edging. 

No. 57. — This edging may be made of Belding's 
knitting silk, or of cotton or linen thread. Cast on 
19 stitches and knit across plain. 

First row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 5, th o, n, th o, n, 
k 1, p 1, n, k 1. 

Second row. — Th o, n, k 13, th o, n, k 1. 




No. 57. — Diamond Edging. 



Third row.-- -SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 2. 

Fourth row. — Th o, n, k 14, th o, n, k 1. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 2, n, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 1, th o, k 3, th o, k 2. 

Sixth row. — Th o, n, k 15, th o, n, k 1. 

Seventh roiv. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 1, th o, k 5, th o, k 2. 

Eighth row. — Th o, n, k 16, th o, n, k 1. 

Ninth roiv. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, n, th o, n, th o, n, 
k 1, th o, k 7, th o, k 2. 

Tenth row. — Th o, n, k 17, th o, n, k 1. 

Eleventh row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 2, th o, n, th o, 
n, k 1, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, n, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — Th o, n, k 16, th o, n, k 1. 

Thirteenth roza. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 3, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, n, k 1. 

Fourteenth row. — Th o, n, k 15, th o, n, k 1. 

Fifteenth row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, k 4, th o, n, 
th o, n, k i, th o, sl 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Sixteenth row. — Th o, n, k 14, th o, n, k 1. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 

Pompadour Edging. 

No. 58. — Use Belding's knitting silk or crochet 
cotton. Cast on 24 stitches and knit across plain. 

First row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 12, n, 
th o, twice, n, k 1. 

Second row. — K 3, p i, k 20. 



3, n ; 



th o 



Third row. — SI 1, k 3, th o, n, k n, n, th o twice, 
n, k 3 . 

Fourth row. — K 5, p 1, k 18. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 8, n, 
th o twice, n, k 3, th o twice, k 2. 

Sixth row. — K 3, p 1, k 5, p 1, k 16. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 3, th o, n, k 7, n, th o twice, 
n, k 3, th o, k 1, th o, k 5. 

Eighth row. — K 13, p 1, k 14. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 4, n, th o 
twice, n, k 3, n, th o, k 3, th o, n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Tenth row- — K 3, p 1, k 12, pi, k 12. 

Eleventh row. —SI 1, k 3, th o, n, k 
twice, n, k 4, n, th o, k 5, th o, k 5. 

Twelfth row. — K 19, pi, k 10. 

Thirteenth row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, n, th o, n, n, th o 
twice, n, k 5, n, th o, k 1, sl 1, n, pass slipped stitch 
over, th o 3 times, n, k 1, th o, k 1, n, th o twice, k 2. 

Fourteenth row. — K 3, p 1, k 6, p 1, k 12, p 1, 
k 8. In working off the 3 put-overs, use each one 
as a stitch. 

Fifteenth row. — Sl 1, k 3, th o, n, k 3, n, th o 
twice, n, k 5, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, k 1, n, k 4. 

Sixteenth row. — K 20, p 1, k 10. 

Seventeenth row. — Sl 1, k 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 4, 
n, th o twice, n, k 4, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, k 1, n, th o 
twice, n, n. 

Eighteenth roiu. — K 3, p 1, k 13, p 1, k 12. 

Nineteenth row. — Sl 1, k 3, th o, n, k 7, n, th o 
twice, n, k 3, th o, sl 1, n, pass slipped stitch 
over, th o, k 1, n, k 4. 

Twentieth row. — K 14, p 1, k 14. 

Twenty-first 7'ow. — Sl 1, k 2, th o, n, th o, n, 
th o twice, n 4 times, th o twice, n, n. 

Twenty-second row. — K 3, p 1, k 5, p 1, k 16. 

Twenty-third row. — Sl 1, k 3, th o, n, k n, n, th o, 
sl 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, th o, k 2, n. 

Twenty-fourth row. — K 3, p 1, k 20. 



k8, 




No. 58. — Pompadour Edging. 



Twenty-fifth row. — Sl 1, k 2, th o, n, th 0, n, k 12, 
n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Twenty-sixth roiv. — K 3, p 1, k 20. 

Twenty-seventh row. — Sl 1, k 3, th o, n, k 18. 

Twenty-eighth row. — Knit plain and repeat from 
first row for all the work. 



46 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Fancy Scollop Edging. 

No. 59. — : Cast on 21 stitches and knit across plain. 
First row. — K 11, th o, n, th o, n, th o 4 times, 
n, n, th o, n. 

Second row. — K 4; then out of the 4 put-overs, 




No. 59. — Fancy Scollop Fudging. 



k 1, pi.ki.pi, slipping off 1 loop or put-over at 
a time, k 15. 

Third row. — K 5, n, th o twice, n, k 3, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 4, n, th o, k 1. 

Fourth row. — K 16, p 1, k 6. 

Fifth row. — K 3, n, th o twice, n, n, th o twice, 
n, k 2, th o, n, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, k 1. 

Sixth row — K 14, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 4. 

Seventh row. — K 5, n, th o twice, n, k 5, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 2, n, th o, k 1. 

Eighth row. — K 16, p 1, k 6. 

Ninth ro7v. — K 3, n, th o twice, n, n, th o 
twice, n, k 4, th o, n, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, k 1. 

Tenth row. — K 14, pi, k 3, p 1, k 4. 




No. 60.— Knitted Pointed Lace. 

Eleventh row. — K 5, n, th twice, n, k 7, th o, n, 
th o, n, n, th o, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — K 16, p 1, k 6. 

Thirteenth row. — K 17, th o, n, th o, n; slip the 
stitch just made over onto the left-hand needle, 
pass the last two stitches on this needle over the 



stitch, and then pass the latter back to the right- 
hand needle. 

Fourteenth row. — Knit across plain and repeat 
from the first row for all the work. 

Knitted Pointed Lace. 

No. 60. — This is pretty lace for cotton or linen. 
It is also especially pretty for trimming flannel 
garments if knit of Saxony yarn on rather coarse 
steel needles so that it will be open and lace-like. 
Cast on 17 stitches. 

First row. — Knit 3, th o, n, th o, n, k 3, th o, n, 
k 2, th o twice, k 3. 

Second row. — K 4, p 1, k 3, th o, n, k 5, th o, n, k 2. 
Third row. — K 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 2, th o, 
n, k 7. 

Fotcrth row. — K 8, th o, n, k 5, th o, n, k 2. 
Fifth row. — K 3, th o, n, k 2, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, 
n, th o 3 times, n, 
th o twice, n, ki.' 
Sixth row. — K 
3, p 1, k 2, p 1, 
k 3, th o, n, k s, 
th o, n, k 2. 

Seventh row. — 
K 3, th o, n, 
k 3, th o, n, th 
o, n, k 9. 

Eighth ro7c>. — 
K 10, th o, n, k 
5, th o, n, k 2. 

Ninth row. — 
K 3, th o, n, k 5, 
th o, n, k 2, th o 
twice, n, th o 
twice, n, th o 
twice, n, k 1. 

Tenth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, 
k 3, th o, n, k 5, th o, n, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — K 3, th o, n, n, th d twice, 
n, k 1, th o, n, k 12. 

Twelfth row. — K 13, th o, n, k 2, p 1, k 2, 
th o, n, k 2. 

Thirteenth row. — K 3, th o, n, k 5, th o, 
n, k 12. 

Fourteenth raw. — Bind off 7; k 5, th o, 
n, k 5, th o, n, k 2, and repeat from first 
row. 

Knitted Edging. 

No. 61. — Cast on 22 stitches and knit 
across plain. 

First roiv. — K 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 2, 
th o, k 1, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, k 2, th o twice, 
n, th o twice, n. 

Second row. — K 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, n, k 1, th o, 
si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, th o, k 3, 
th o, n, n, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 
Third row. — K 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, th o, n, 
k 1, n, th o, k 1, th o, k 1, n, k 6. 

Fourth ro7v. — Cast off 2, k 5, th o, k 3, th o, si 1, 
n, pass slipped stitch over, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 1, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 




No. 61. — Knitted Edglng. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



47 



Double-Eyelet Edging. 

No. 62. — Cast on 23 stitches and knit across plain. 

First row. — K 2, th o, k 5, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, k 1 1. 

Second rmu. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k i, th o, k 17. 

Third row. — K 2, th o, k 1, n, th o twice, si 1, 
n, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, si 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, th o, k 12. 

Fourth row. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 10; then k 1, p 1 and k 1 
out of the 2 put-overs; k 5. 

Fifth row. — K 1, n, th o, n, 
th o, n, k 10. 

Sixth roiv. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 17. 

Seventh row. — K 1, n, th o, n, k 1, 
th o, n, k 9. 

Eighth row. — K 2, th o, k 1, 



k 3, n, th o, k 3, 
pass slipped 
n, th o, k 5, 




No. 62.— Double-Eyelet Edging. 



si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th 

0, k 16. 

Ninth row. — K 

1, n, th o, si 1, n, 
pass slipped stitch 
over, tho, k 1, n, th 
o twice, si 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, 
k 1, th o, n, k 8. 

Tenth roiv. — K 

2, th o, k 1, si 1, 
n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, 
tho, k 5; then k 1, 
p 1 and k 1 out of 
the 2 put-overs; k7. 

Eleventh row. — 
K 2, th o, k 3, th o, 
n, k 3, n, th o, k 10. 
si 1, n, pass slip- 



Twelfth row. — K 2, th o, k 1 
ped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 16. 

Repeat from beginning for all the work. 

Knitted Fluted Edge or Border. 

No. 63. — According to the material used this de- 
sign is suitable for a counterpane, a garniture or 
a child's collar. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by 6. 
Then work back and forth for 6 rows, alternately 
purling 4 stitches and knitting 2; but in the 2nd, 
4th and 6th rows you purl the knitted stitches of 
the preceding row. and knit the purled ones, so that 
there will be a right and wrong side to the pattern. 

Seventh row. — * K 2, make 1, k 2, p 2 and re- 
peat from *. 

Eighth and every alternate following row. — 
Alternately purl 5 and k 2, except that in each 
row the purled stitches will be increased by 2. 

Ninth row. — * K 2, m 1, k 1, m 1, k 2, p 2 and 
repeat from *. 

Eleventh row. — * K 2, m 1, k 3, m 1 
and repeat from *. 

Thirteenth row. — * K 2, m 1, k 5, m 1, k 2, p 2 
and repeat from *. 

Repeat the 13th row, increasing by 2 stitches 



, P 
k 2 . 




between each 2 made stitches, until there are 21 
rows, and 13 stitches between the made stitches. 

Cast off all the stitches. Finish the upper edge 
with a row of single crochet. Complete the lower 
edge with 1 double in every other stitch, with 
1 chair between; then 1 single in each double, 
with 1 picot between, the picot being made with 
5 chain and 
1 slip stitch 
in 1st stitch 
of chain. 

Knitted 
Oak-Leaf 

Edging. 

No. 64. — 
Cast on 22 
stitchesand 
knit across 
plain. 

First 
row. — 

* Knit 2, th o twice, p 2 together and repeat 3 times 
from *. K 1, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, k 1. 

Second row. — K 3, pi,k2,pi,ki, * th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 2 and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Third ro7v. — * K 2, th o twice, p 2 together and 
repeat 3 times more from *. K 3, th o twice, n, 
th o twice, n, k 1. 

Fourth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 3, * th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 2, and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Fifth row. — * K 2, th o twice, p 2 together and 
repeat 3 times more from *. K 5, th o twice, n, 
th o twice, n, k 1. 

Sixth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 5, * th o twice, 
p 2 together, k 2 and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Seventh row. — * K 2, th o twice, p 2 together and 
repeat 3 times more from *. K 7, th o twice, n, 
th o twice, n, k 1. 

Eighth row. — K 3, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 7, * th o twice, 



No. 63. — Knitted Fluted Edge or Border. 




Bo. 64. — Knitted Oak-Leaf Edging. 

purl 2 together, k 2 and repeat 3 times more from*. 

Ninth row. — * K 2, th o twice, p 2 together; re- 
peat 3 times more from *. K 14. 

Tenth row. — Bind off 8, k 5, * th o twice, purl 2 
together, k 2 and repeat 3 times more from * Re- 
peat from first row for all the work. 



48 



THE ART CF KNITTING. 



Rose-Leaf Lace. 



No. 65. — Cast on 34 stitches. 

First row. — K 2, th o, k 1 

slipped stitch over, pi, n, k 1, 




No. 65. — Rose-Leaf Lace. 



slip 1, k 1, pass 
pi, k 1, si 1, k 1, 
passslipped 
stitch over, 
p 1, n, k 1, 
th o, k 1, 
th o, n, th o 
twice, n, th 
o twice, n, 
* th o, n, 
and repeat 
three times 
more from 
*, th 0, k 2. 
S e con d 
row . — K 
13. Pi,k2, 
p 1, k 1, th 

0, n, p 3, k 

1, p 2, k 1, 
p 2, k 1, p 

3, k 2 - 
Third 

row. — K 2, 
th o, k 1, 
th o, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over, p 1, n, p 1, 
si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over, p 1, n, th o, k 1, 
th o, k 1, th o, n, k 7, * th o, n, and repeat three 
times more from *; th o, k 2. 

Fourth roiv. — K 19, th o, n, p 4, k 1, p 1, k 1, 
p 1, k 1, p 4, k 2. 

Fifth row. — K 2, th o, k 3, th o, si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, p 1, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, th o, 
k 3, th o, k 1, th o, n, th o twice, n, th o twice, n, k 4, * 
th o, n, and repeat three times more from *; th o, k 2. 
Sixth row. — K 17, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 1, th o, n, p 6, 
k 1, p 6, k 2. 

Seventh row. — K 2, th o, k 5, th o, si 1, n, pass 

slipped stitch over, 
th o, k 5, th o, k 1, 
th 0, n, k 13; slip 
seven of the eight 
remaining stitches 
over the first one on 
the needle, k 1. 

Fighth rcnu. — K 
15, tho,n, pis, k 2 . 
Repeat from first 
row. 

Vine Edging. 

No. 66. — Cast on 
26 stitches and knit 
across plain. 

First rouh — K 2, 
th o, k 1, si 1, n, 
th o, k 1, th o, k 1, 
si and b, p 1, n, k 1, 




No. G6. — Vine Edging. 



pass slipped stitch over, k 1, 
si and b, p 1, n, k 1, p 1, k 1 
th o, k 1, th o twice, k 1. th o twice, k 1 

Second row. — K 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 1, p 3 
p 2, k 1, p 2, k 1, p 3, k 8. 



Third row. — K 2, th o, k 1, si i, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, si and b, 
p 1, n, p 1, si and b, p 1, n, th o, k 1, th o, k 7. 

Fourth row.' — Cast off 4, k 2, p 4, k 1, p 1, k 1, 
p 1, k 1, p 4, k 8. 

Fifth row. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 3, th o, si 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, p 1, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch 
over, th o, k 3, th o, k 1, th o twice, k 1, th o twice, k 1. 

Sixth row. — K 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 1, p 6, k 1, p 6, k 8. 

Seventh row. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 5, th o, si 1, n, 
pass slipped stitch over, th o, k 5, th o, k 7. 

Eighth row. — Cast off 4, k 2, p 15, k 8. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 

Scroll-Leaf Lace. 

No. 67. — Thread or any preferred make of cro- 
chet cotton may be used in knitting this lace. 

Cast on 23 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1, knit 1, thread over, slip 1, knit 
1, pass slipped stitch over knit stitch, knit 9, thread 
over, narrow, thread over, narrow, thread over 3 
times, narrow, knit 1, thread over, narrow, knit 1. 

Second row. — K 6, pi, k 1, pi, making 3, 
stitches of the 
large loop, k 
14, p 1. k 2. 



/ 



Third row. 




1; 



— Slip 1, k 1, 
th o, si 1, k 1, 
pass slipped 
stitch over 
knit stitch, k 
3, n, th o 
twice, n, k 3, 
th o, n, th o, 
n, k 4, n, th 
o, k 2. 

Fourth row. 
— Knit 17, p 
i,k5,pi,k 2 . 

Fifth row. 
— Slip 1, k 1, 
th o, si 1, k 1, 

pass slipped stitch over knit stitch, k 1, n, th o twice, 
n, n, th o twice, n, k 2, th 0, n, th o, n, k 3, n, th o, k 2. 

Sixth row. — Knit 15, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 2. 

Seventh row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over knit stitch, k 3, n, th o twice, n, 
k 5, th o, n, th o, n, k 2, n, th o, k 2. 

Eighth row. — Knit 17, p 1, k 5, p 1, k 2. 

JVinth row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass slip- 
ped stitch over knit stitch, k 1, n, th o twice, n, n, 
th o twice, n, k 4, th o, n, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, k 2. 

Tenth row. — Knit 15, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 3, p 1, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over knit stitch, k 3, n, th o twice, n, 
k 7, th o, n, th o, n, n, th o, k 2. 

Twelfth row. — Knit 17, p 1, k 5, p 1, k 2. 

Thirteenth row. — Slip 1, k 1, th o, si 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over knit stitch, k 15, th o, n, th o, n, k 3. 

Fourteenth row. — Bind off 3, k 19, p i, k 2. 

Repeat from first row for next leaf. 



No. 67. — Scroll-Leaf Lace. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



49 



Dotted Lace. 

No. 68. — Cast on 19 stitches. 

First row. — K 3, th o, n, k 2, th o, k 1, th o, 




No. 68.— Dotted Lace. 



n, k 1, n, th o, k 2, th o twice, n, th o twice, n. 

Second row. — K 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, n, k 1, th o, si 1, 
n, pass slipped stitch over, th o, k 3, th o, n, n, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Third row. — K 3, th o, n, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 1, n, k 6. 

Fourth row. — Cast off 2 stitches, k 5, th o, k 3, 
th o, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, th o, k 3, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 

Insertion Edging. 
No. 69. — Cast on 15 stitches. 
First row. — SI r, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 




No. 69. — Insertion Edging. 



k 1, th o, n, k 3, th o twice, p 2 together, k 1, th o, 
k 2. (The thread over twice before purling only 
makes 1 extra stitch). 
4 



Second row. — K 2, p i, k 1, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 4, pi, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2 . 

Third row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2, th o, n, k 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2, 
th o, k 2. 

Fourth row. — K 2, p 1, k 2, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 3, p 1, k 2, th o twice, p 2 together, k 2. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 3, th o, n, k 1, th o twice, p 2 together, k 3, 
th o, k 2. 

Sixth row. — K 2, p 1, k 3, th o twice, p 2 
together, k 2, p 1, k 3, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2 . 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, p 2 to- 
gether, k 4, th o, n, th o twice, p 2 together, k 6. 

Eighth row. — Cast off 4, k 2, th o twice, p 2 




No. 10. — Dotted Insertion. 



together, k 1, p 1, k 4, th o twice, p 2 together, 
k 2. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 

By omitting the points, an insertion to match 
may be made. 

Dotted Insertion,. 

No. 70. — Cast on 21 stitches and knit across 
plain. 

First row. — K 3, th o, n, k 2, th o, k r, th o, n, 
k 1, n, th o, k 1, th o, k 4, th o, n, k 1. 

Second row. — K 3, th o, n, n, th o, k 3, th o, si 1, 
n, pass slipped stitch over, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 2, 
th o, n, k 1. 

Third row. — K 3, th o, k 3 together, th o, n, k 1, 
n, th o, k 1, th o, n, k 1, n, th o, n, k 1, th o, n, k 1. 

Fourth roiu. — K 3, th o, n, k 1, th o, si 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, th o, k 3, th o, si 1, n, pass slip- 
ped stitch over, th o, k 3, th o, n, k 1. 

Repeat from first row for all the work. 

This insertion matches the 1 edging seen at No. 
68, and both may be made of silk or cotton. 



50 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




No. 71. — Knitted Edging. 



Knitted Edging. 

No. 71. — This pretty design may be used with 
the insertion seen at No. 34 on page 37. 

Cast on 22 stitches. 

First row.— Slip 1, knit 2 together, make 1, knit 

2 together, 
knit 8,* make 
1, slip 1, knit 
1, pass the 
slipped stitch 
over, knit 1; 
repeat from 
* once more; 
make 1, knit 

3- 

Secondrow. 
— Slip 1, knit 
18, knit 1, 
purl 1 in the 
made stitch, 
knit 2. 

Third row. 
— Slip 1, knit 
13, * make 
1, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over, knit 1, 
repeat from * once more; make 1, knit 3. 
Foicrth row. — Slip 1, knit to end of row. 
Fifth row. — Slip 1, knit 2 together, make 1, knit 
2 together, knit 10, * make 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass 
slipped stitch over, knit 1, repeat from * once 
more; end with make 1, knit 3. 

Sixth rcnv. — Slip 1, knit 20, knit 1, purl 1 in 
made stitch, knit 2. 

Seventh row. — Slip 1, knit 15, * make 1, slip 1, 
knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, repeat from * once 
more; make 1, knit 3. 

Eighth row. — Slip 1, knit to end of row. 
Ninth row. — Slip 1, knit 2 together, make 1, knit 
2 together, knit 12, * make 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass 
slipped stitch over, knit 1, repeat from * once 
more, make 1, knit 3. 

Tenth roia.— Slip 1, knit 22, knit 1, purl 1 in 
made stitch, knit 2. 

Eleventh row. — Slip 1, knit 17, * make 1, slip 1, 
knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, knit 1, repeat from 
* once more; make 1, knit 3. 

Twelfth row. — Slip 1, knit to end of row. 
Thirteenth roiv. — Slip 1, knit 2 together, make 1, 
knit 2 together, knit 4, knit 2 together, make 1, 
knit 3 together, make 1, knit 2 together, knit 3, * 
make 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over, knit 
1, repeat from * once more; make 1, knit 3. 

Fourteenth row. — Slip 1, knit 13, knit 1, purl 1 in 
the made stitch, knit 1, knit 1, purl 1 in the made 
stitch, knit 6; knit 1, purl 1 in the made stitch, knit 2. 
Fifteenth row. — Slip, 1, knit 7, knit 2 together, 
make 1, knit 2 together, knit 1, knit 2 together, 
make 1, knit 2 together, k 1, k 2 together; * make 
1, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over, knit 1, 
repeat from * twice more. 

Sixteenth rmv. — Slip 1, knit n, knit 1, purl 1 in 
the made stitch, knit 3, knit 1 and purl 1 in the 
made stitch; knit to end of row. 



Seventeenth row. — Slip 1, knit 2 together, make 1, 
knit 2 together, knit 4, knit 2 together, make 1, 
knit 3 together, make 1, knit 2 together, knit 1, 
knit 2 together, * make 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit 1 ; repeat from * twice more. 

Eighteenth row. — Slip 1, knit n, knit 1, purl 1 in 
made stitch; knit 1, knit 1, purl 1 in made stitch; 
knit 6; knit 1 and purl 1 in the made stitch, knit 2. 

Nineteenth row. — Slip 1, knit 15, knit 2 together, 
*make 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over, 
knit 1 ; repeat from * twice more. 
' Twentieth row. — Slip 1, knit to end of row. 

Twenty-first row. — Slip 1, knit 2 together, * make 
1, knit 2 together, knit 10, knit 2 together, make 1, 
slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over, knit 1, 
repeat from * twice more. 



knit 20; knit 1 and 

2. 

knit 13, knit 2 to- 

1, pass the slipped 

* twice more. 

knit to end of row. 



Tiuenty-secotid row. — Slip 1, 
purl 1 in the made stitch, knit 

Twenty-third row. — Slip 1, 
gether, * make 1, slip 1, knit 
stitch over, knit 1, repeat from 

Twenty-fourth row. — Slip 1, 

Twenty-fifth row. — Slip 1, knit 2 together, make 
1, knit 2 together, knit 8, knit 2 together, * make 
1, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over, knit 1, 
repeat from * twice more. 

Twenty-sixth row. — Slip 1, knit 18; knit 1 and 
purl 1 in the made stitch; knit 2. 

Twenty-seventh row. — Slip 1, knit n, knit 2 to- 
gether, * make 1, slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped 
stitch over, knit 1, repeat from * twice more. 

Twe?ity-eighth row. — Slip 2, knit to end of row. 

Repeat from first row. 

Kilted Edging. 
Cast on any number of stitches di- 



No. 72. — ■ 


Ca< 


visible 


by 9. j 

First ! 




r w. — ' 


] Q 


Purl 8, | 




k 1 and 1 




repeat. | 
Second S 




r w. — | 




Purl 2, | 




k 7 and \ 




repeat. 

Third s 




r w. — [! 




Purl 6, | 




k 3 and jjP^| 


repeat 


across 


the row. 






No. 72. — Kilted Edging. 



Fourth and Fifth rows. — P 4, k 5 and repeat. 

Sixth row. — P 6, k 3 and repeat. 

Seventh row. — P 2, k 7 and repeat. 

Eighth and Ninth rows. — Like 1st row. Then 
repeat from 2nd row for all the work. 

For the Shell Edge. — Make 1 s. c. into the line 
between the kilts; skip 3 stitches, make 3 d. c, 
3 tr. and 3 d. c. into next stitch; skip 3, make 1 
s. c. into next line. Repeat shells for each kilt. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



51 



GGNG^ftL HQL6S FO^ ^NlTTlNG AlTTeN$, $0(K!<; 

AN0 <$TO(k!lNG<;,. 



For the assistance of knitters who require definite instructions regarding general work, and especially in knitting mittens 
socks and stockings, we give the following rules. Expert knitters have endorsed them and they will be found correct. But 
at the same time, they may differ in a few points, from some of the illustrated and other directions found in the following 
department. This, however, does not signify, since there are many rules and methods for knitting the same kinds of articles, 
and all work out satisfactorily, according to the selection made by the knitter. We have thought it advisable to mention 
this fact before proceeding, so that our patrons and students will not be confused by the variety of instructions we offer. 



Rule for Knitting Mittens from Knitting 
Silk or Fine Yarn. 

No. 19 needles, or No. r8, which are one size 
coarser, are generally selected for knitting mittens 
when knitting silk or fine yarn is used. The size 
•chosen must depend upon the silk or yarn selected, 
as the different makes of the latter vary somewhat 
in texture, some being finer than others. 

To make the instructions for knitting mittens 
found on the following pages more easily under- 
stood, we give here some directions of a general 
character, and two diagrams, Nos. 1 and 2, which 
will serve to correctly and easily guide the knitter 
in making mittens of any size, either for children, 
for ladies, or for gentlemen. 

Mittens with fancy knitting at the wrist and back 
will be chiefly considered; and frequent reference 
will be made to the diagrams. 

[Diagram No. 1 shows the manner of forming 
the thumb, as referred to in the following directions. 
The oblong piece, A, B, C, D, shows a section of 
the wrist. The double lines, a, b, c, d, represent 
the purled stripes spoken of in the rule, and the 
dots on the margin of the triangular piece (E) 
represent the points where the increase is made to 
form the same. The triangular piece (E) is the 
lowest portion of the thumb.] 

Most mittens are knitted in rounds, forming a 
tubular web, in one side of which sufficient increase 
is made during the progress of the work to form 
a thumb. When the proper length is obtained to 
cover the wider portion of the hand, the web is 
decreased at regular intervals until all the stitches 
are disposed of, thus giving the mittens a round 
finish like the toe of a stocking. 

The knitting' of a mitten, therefore, will be 
best considered in four parts: The wrisr, the 
thumb, the gusset and the remaining portion, 
which, for convenience, we call the hand. 

The Wrist. 

Cast on any number of stitches which is a multi- 
ple of the number of stitches required in the fancy 
design to be used, and knit in rounds according to 



the rule laid down for the fancy pattern. Repeat 
the pattern any number of times to suit the length 
required. 

If fancy work is to be extended down the back 
of the hand, ten or twelve rounds of plain work 
should be introduced at both sides of the fancy 
stripe before the increase for the thumb is begun. 
If fancy work is to be introduced in the wrist only, 
the pattern should be discontinued ten or twelve 
rounds before the thumb is commenced, and plain 
knitting substituted. 

In children's mittens from five to eight rounds 
will be enough, according to the size. 

The Position of the Thumb. 

In all mittens where a fancy design is introduced 
in the back, great care must be taken to start the 
thumb at such a point that the fancy stripe 
will be in 
the center of 
the back of 
mitten when 
it is on the 
hand. This 
will not be 
the case if 
the stripe be 
placed in 
the center 
of the mit- 
ten when 
the latter is 
folded as 
shown in dia- 
gram No. 2. 

The cen- 
tral stitoh of the fancy stripe should be about one- 
third the distance around the hand, measuring from 
the purled stripe which outlines the thumb. The 
number of plain stitches, therefore, between the 
thumb and fancy stripe will vary according to the 
size of the mitten and the number of stitches 
employed in the stripe. 

It should also be remembered that on a right- 
hand mitten the thumb must be at the left of the, 




No. 1. 



No. 2. 



52 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



fancy stripe, while on a left-hand mitten it must be 
placed at the right of the stripe. 

Both mittens are made alike where the fancy 
knitting is only in the wrist. 

The Thumb. 

The thumb is formed by taking three stitches as 
a base, and increasing one stitch on each of the* 
two outside stitches, in every fourth round, until a 
sufficient number of stitches is obtained for the 
widest part. 

One stitch is to be purled each side of the three 
base stitches in every round until the point A 
(No. 2) is reached, thus forming purled stripes 
which outline the thumb, as shown in diagram 
No. 1. 

The best manner of increasing is to pick up 
from the back part of work the loop which crosses 
the base of the stitch on which the increase is 
made, knit a new stitch in that loop and afterzvards 
knit the stitch itself. This method makes two 
stitches where there was before but one, and leaves 
the work solid and neat. 

The ordinary methods of widening used in knit- 
ting are not recommended, as they leave small, 
round holes in the work, which are not desirable 
in a mitten. Having obtained, by widening, the 
requisite number of stitches for the thumb, work 
three rounds more and place these stitches (not 
including the purled stitches) upon a piece of 
strong twine, and tie securely, so that the work 
may be safe while the hand is being finished. The 
next step is the formation of a small gusset be- 
tween the thumb and hand at the point A (No. 
2), in order to make a more perfect fit. 

The Gusset. 

This is commenced at the end of the next round, 
by casting on four extra stitches. In the four 
rounds which follow, a decrease of one stitch in 
each round must be made at the point where the 
extra stitches were cast on, thus disposing of the 
four extra stitches, and forming one-half of a small 
diamond-shaped gusset, the other half being formed 
in the same manner when work on the thumb is 
resumed. 

The Hand. 

We have already described that portion of the 
hand which includes the gusset, and need only add 
that, with the exception of the gusset, that section 
of work comprised between the points A, B, C, D 
(No. 2) is a simple repetition of rounds of plain 
or fancy knitting, as best suits the taste. ' 

The number of stitches in the round in this sec- 
tion of the mitten is always three less than were 
used in commencing the wrist. To knit that 
portion of the mitten represented above the 
points C, D (No. 2', observe the following instruc- 
tions: 

Having obtained the proper length for the 
widest part of the hand, if the number of stitches 



be not already divisible by 9, narrow in the next 
round at intervals of 7 stitches until the number 
is so divisible; then proceed as follows: 

First round. — Knit plain. 

Second round. — * K 7, n, repeat from * and knit 
7 rounds plain. 

Tenth round. — K 6, n, repeat from * and knit 6 
rounds plain. 

Seventeenth round. — * K 5, n, repeat from * and 
knit 5 rounds plain. 

Twenty-third round. — * K 4, n, repeat from * and 
knit 4 rounds plain. Now narrow once on each 
needle, in every round, until only 4 stitches are 
left on a needle; then narrow twice .on each needle 
and cast off. When decreasing once on each nee- 
dle only, do not narrow at the same point in every, 
round, but at a different place in each successive- 
round. 

To Finish the Thumb. 

Place the stitches which are on the twine on 3 
needles, and pick up 4 loops from the base of the 
gore formed between the hand and thumb by cast- 
ing on the 4 extra stitches. Knit once around, and 
narrow once in each of the next 4 rounds at the 
point where the gusset is, then knit as many rounds 
as necessary to give proper length and finish by 
narrowing once on each needle in every round, 
until all the stitches are disposed of. 

Rule for Children's Mittens of Silk 
or Fine Yarn. 

There are so many sizes required to suit different 
ages, that we cannot undertake to instruct as to 
any particular size. The general method of knit- 
ting mittens of all sizes has just been given; but to 
assist our students further, we give the following 
table as an approximation of the number of 
stitches which will produce mittens suitable for 
various ages. 

For a child of 1 year, 56 stitches. 

For a child of 2 years, 60 stitches. 

For a child of 4 years, 64 stitches. 

For a child of 6 years, 70 stitches. 

The number of stitches used, however, must be a 
multiple of the number required for the fancy pat- 
tern adopted; and for this reason small patterns 
are more desirable than large. 

The pattern used can be repeated to suit the 
fancy of the knitter. We recommend a narrow 
hem, as described below for such mittens. 

Directions for Knitting a Hem. 

Very attractive borders for mittens or stockings 
are easily made by casting on the stitches loosely 
and knitting several rounds plain, followed by one 
round of open-work knit thus: N, th o, repeat. 

Follow the round of open-work with a number 
of rounds of plain knitting equal to that which 
preceded it. 

In the next round, turn the edge of work up in- 
side, and pick up and knit with each stitch on the 



THU ART OF KNITTING. 



needles one loop from the edge where your work 
was commenced, thus forming a perfect hem. 
There will always be exactly the same number of 
loops on the edge of the work as there are stitches 
on the needles, if the casting on has been properly 
done. 

These hems may be of any desired width. In 
our instructions for mittens and also for fancy tops 
to socks, stockings and mittens we have used some 
narrow and some wide borders. 

The knitted hem is recommended for beginning, 
stockings, either for ladies or children. It forms a 
neat, strong border, precisely like that seen in ex- 
pensive, " full-fashioned " French hosiery, and looks 
much more attractive than the old fashioned 
method of ribbing. 

Rule I. for Knitting Men's Silk Socks. 

No. 19 knitting needles should be used in knit- 
ting socks from knitting silk of the ordinary size. 

Cast 113 stitches on 3 needles, knit once 
around plain, then" knit in ribs, alternating 4 
stitches plain and 2 purl for 70 rounds, which will . 
give about $% inches; then knit plain for 6 inches, 
and commence heel by taking 57 stitches on one 
needle, * purl across, knit back plain and repeat 
from * until 57 rows are done, counting each time 
across as a row. 

In knitting the heel, the first stitch in each row, 
whether it be a knitted or a purled row, should be 
slipped. 

Now commence to narrow as follows: 

Fifty-eighth row. — K 13, si and b, k 10, n, k 3, 
si and b, k 10, n, k 13. 

Fifty-ninth row. — Purl. 

Sixtieth row. — K 13, si and b, k 8, n, k 3, si and 
b, k 8, n, k 13. 

Sixty-first row. — Purl. 

Sixty-second row. — K 13, si and b, k 6, n, k 3, 
si and b, k 6, n, k 13. 

Sixty-third row. — Purl. 

Sixty-fourth row. — K 13, si and b, k 4, n, k 3, 
si and b, k 4, n, k 13. 

Sixty-fifth row. — Purl. 

Sixty-sixth row. — K 13, si and b, k 2, n, k 3, si 
and b, k 2, n, k 13. 

Sixty-seventh roiiu. — Purl. 

Sixty-eighth row. — K 13, si and b, n, k 3, si and 
b, n, k 13. 
. Sixty-ninth row. — Purl. 

Seventieth row. — Commence by knitting 17; ***, 
then fold the needles together with wrong side of 
heel out, slip off the first stitch, knit 2 together, 
taking one from each needle, pass slipped stitch 
over, and continue knitting 2 together and passing 
the last made stitch over until all are disposed of 
but one, which completes the heel, which may now 
be turned right side out. Pick up and knit 1 stitch 
in each loop on the side of heel going toward 
the left, knit across the instep needle; pick up and 
knit in the loops on the opposite side of the heel, 
1 stitch in each as before, which completes the first 
round in the foot. 



In knitting the second round, extra stitches must 
be made, one in every four on the sides of the heel 
only (not on instep), and in this round it is neces- 
sary also to decrease 2 by narrowing at the right 
hand corner, and si and b at the left hand corner 
next to instep. In the next 2 rounds decrease 2 in 
the same manner, and afterwards decrease 2 in 
every alternate round until the whole number of 
stitches is reduced to 112, then continue knitting 
until the required length of the foot is obtained. 
To narrow for the toe, take an equal number of 
stitches on each needle, commence at the middle 
of the instep needle, knit all but 3, si and b, k 1; 
on the next needle, k 1, n, k until 3 are left, 
si and b, k 1 ; on the next needle, k 1, n, k until 
3 are left, si and b, k r ; at the first corner of instep 
needle, k 1, n, k to the middle of the needle, which 
completes first round of decreasing for the toe. 
Knit plain 3 rounds; then decrease in next round as 
before. Knit 3 rounds plain and decrease in 
next round as before. Knit 2 rounds plain and 
decrease in next round as before; knit 2 rounds 
plain and decrease in next round as before; knit 
2 rounds plain and decrease in every round after, 
1 stitch on each needle until 4 stitches are left 
on each needle; then knit 2 rounds plain and 
finish off. 

When decreasing only 1 stitch on a needle for 
the toe, care must be taken to narrow at the first 
corner of the needles in the first round, and si and b 
at the last corner in the next round, and so on 
alternately until done. 

This rule will produce socks suitable for a man 
of full size. The number of stitches should be 
less for a very small foot or for boys' socks. 

This rule for toe is suitable for all sizes of stock- 
ings, and a good heel for any size can be made by 
knitting and purling as many times across as there 
are stitches on the heel needle, before commencing 
to decrease. 

The rule for decreasing in the heel will need to 
be slightly changed in different sizes, and any 
knitter on reading these directions will easily see 
what changes are required. The general rule for 
the number of stitches in a heel is to take one-half 
of the whole number in the ankle, and the number 
should be odd. 

On completion it will improve the appearance of 
the socks to lay a dry cloth over them and press 
with a hot iron. 

Rule II. for Knitting Men's Socks. 

For plain socks, which may be made by the 
veriest amateur in knitting, we give the following 
instructions: 

A set of No. 19 needles and knitting silk of the 
ordinary size will be needed. . . 

Cast 40 stitches loosely on each of 3 needles, 
and knit around once plain ; do not knit too 
tight. Now knit 2 plain, seam 1 ; repeat this move- 
ment round and round till you have knit a finger 
in depth ; then commence to knit plain, and con- 
tinue for one finger and a-half, keeping the 



54 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



one seam stitch at the back. Then commence 
the heel. Put 60 stitches on one needle ; knit 
on these stitches thus: Knit forward plain, and 
backward seamed, until you have half a finger; 
now begin to narrow as follows : Knit plain to 
within 3 stitches of the seam stitch, slip 1, narrow, 
pass slipped stitch over, knit seam stitch as usual, 
slip 1, narrow, pass slipped stitch over; finish the 
row plain. 

Repeat this narrowing in every plain row, until 
you have narrowed 4 times. Knit to the seam 
stitch, fold together wrong side out, and bind off 
together; continue until one stitch only is left. 

Pick up the stitches on the sides of the heel, and 
knit around 4 times plain; then at the beginning 
and end of the heel-needles narrow as follows: Knit 
2, slip the 3rd stitch from the first end of the first 
needle, narrow, pass the slipped stitch over; knit the 
instep needle plain, slip the first stitch of third 
needle, narrow, pass the slipped stitch over; knit 
to the end of the needle plain. Knit 4 plain rounds 
between the narrowings. Continue to narrow until 
you have but 120 stitches, the number you had at 
first; knit a finger and a-half plain; then begin to 
narrow for the toe; knit two stitches plain at the 
beginning of the needle, slip 1, narrow, pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit plain till you h~ve but 
five stitches left on needle, then slip 1, narrow, 
pass the slipped stitch over, knit 2 plain; repeat on 
each needle; knit 4 plain rounds between; repeat 
these 5 rounds until the toe is narrowed off. Be 
very careful not to split the silk in knitting ; and 
when finished, spread the sock out in the shape of 
those you buy, lay over it a wet cloth that has 
been wrung pretty dry, and press with an iron 
not too hot. It is impossible to knit silk perfectly 
smooth, but it will press all right. 

Rule III. for Knitting Men's Silk Socks. 

In knitting silk socks for men, use 4 needles, No. 
18, and 2^ ounces of knitting silk. Decide the 
length you require the foot of sock to be ; ioj^ in- 
ches is the average size for a man. Take your 
needles and silk and knit 20 stitches and 20 rows 
upon them, and fasten them off. Ascertain how 
many stitches in this piece go to the inch and then 
multiply that number by the number of inches in the 
length of foot. This number, when found, will be 
the right quantity to cast on for the leg of the sock. 

The leg of the sock, from the top to the bottom 
of heel is knitted the length of foot and one-fourth 
more. The ribbing is half the length of foot. The 
narrowings are made in one-fourth the length — 
never as many narrowings as in a stocking ; some 
of the best knitters dispense with them in socks. 
K C rows between each narrowing, and make about 
4 narrowings. After that continue to knit until 
you have the exact length required for the foot. 

You now divide for the heel ; keep 4 more 
stitches for the back than for the front, and knit as 
many rows as you have stitches. When knitted, 
narrow on each side of the seam stitch once, then 
knit a plain row. K 3 more narrowed rows, cast 



off, and knit the last row together, doubling it in 
the center. For the foot, take the stitches up on 
the side of the heel. Knit along the front needles. 
The narrowings in the instep must be made in 
one-fourth the length of foot, thus: 

Ascertain how many rows of your work go co 
the inch, then how many there will be in the quar- 
ter only, then how many stitches have to be re- 
duced to make the back the same as the front of 
foot, and you thus arrive at the number of rows 
between each narrowing, remembering that the 
narrowings are made on each side of the under 
part of the foot, and thus 2 in a row. 

After the instep, knit one-third of the length of 
the foot plain before commencing the narrowings 
for the toe. The toe is narrowed on each side of 
the sock, both the upper and under part, 4 narrow- 
ings in the round, and always before and after the 
first two and after the last two stitches in each 
half-round. The square toe is the best to wear 
and to fit. When finished it should be half the 
width of the foot. 

The proportions are given in this manner as 
they will work out correctly for any-sized sock. It 
has only to be remembered that the best knitters 
always leave 2 stitches on each side the seam 
stitch before and after the narrowings in the leg, 
and that by making a scale for yourself of your 
own knitting, using the materials you wish to use, 
you cannot often get astray in your work. 

To Join Wool or Silk in Knitting. 

In knitting stockings or other articles in plain 
knitting join the wool or silk without a knot by 
beginning the new ball when about half a yard of 
the old one is left, knitting both together until the 
first ball is finished. 

To Knit Double Heels. 

To knit double heels to men's socks, use a second 
ball of the wool you are knitting with. Take 18 
stitches each side of the seam stitch, and knit 4 rows 
with the double wool; in the next row decrease 
once near each end of the row. When you have 
knitted about 2 Y /z inches, decrease once each side 
of the seam stitch, leaving 1 stitch at each side of 
the seam stitch between the decreasings; repeat this 
3 times, and then take the 7 middle stitches, knit 
across, and knit the last of the 7 and the next stitch 
together; turn, and seam back across the 7, seaming 
the last of the 7 and the next stitch together; repeat 
till only the 7 are left. This makes a good firm 
heel, but it is apt to wash hard, and is bad to darn. 

The following, though knitted with single wool, 
doubles the heel quite as effectually as the above, 
and is much pleasanter to knit. Begin as follows : 
Divide off 20 stitches each side of the seam. 

First row. — Knit 1, slip 1. 

Second row. — Seam back along all the stitches. 
All the rows are the same. Double heels are excel- 
lent for children's stockings. Toes may be knitted 
in the same manner. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



55 



Knitted Clocks to Socks. 

It is quite easy to knit clocks into socks. After 
narrowing the sock, calculate how many stitches are 
to be left for the heel; usually 16 stitches are left at 
each side the seam stitch. The stitches on each side 
of these are the loops to use for the clocks. A 
small ball of silk will be required for each clock, as 
the silk does not pass round the sock. Begin the 
clock by knitting i stitch with silk; knit round to 
the other clock, and begin that also by knitting i 
stitch with another ball of silk. 

Second row. — Knit 2 stitches with silk, one on 
each side of the first stitch. 

Third row. — Knit 3 stitches, one on each side, 
and one in the middle. 

Fourth row. — Knit 2 stitches as in the second row. 

Fifth row. — Knit 1 stitch as at first. 

Sixth row. — Knit 2 at each side. 

Seventh row. — Knit 1 in the middle; continue this 
alternate, 2 and 1, down to the heel, but end by a 
row of 3 like the middle of the heel. You can copy 
the clocks from any woven stocking; and, if one 
does not care to use silk, wool of a suitable color 
will answer just as well. 

To Knit Initials into Socks or Stockings. 

Take a sampler, or, better still, draw the initials 
and all the letters required on a piece of check- 
ered paper, making a * for each stitch as if for 
marking. When knitting, turn this sampler upside 
down, and purl a stitch to correspond with every * 
on the sampler. 

Directions for Ascertaining the Number of 

Stitches Needed for Knitting Stockings 

from Knitting Silk. 

As the style of work done by different persons 
varies, some knitting loosely and others very closely, 
it is not practical to give an exact number of stitches 
which will answer for any given size of stocking; 
but the following instructions will enable any one 
to estimate, in each case, the number of stitches 
required. 

Select the silk and needles you intend using. 
Cast about 25 stitches onto one needle and knit 
and purl, say twenty times across, back and forth, 
in the same manner as for the heel of a stocking. 

Now measure the sample piece of knitting so 
obtained, and count the number of stitches to one 
inch in width; next select a cotton stocking of 
good shape and correct size lay, it flat upon a table, 
and measure across the top just below the hem or, 
as the case may be, the ribbed part. 

This measurement will be one-half the number 
of inches around the stocking leg in the largest 
part. Having found the number of stitches to the 
inch of your work, and the number of inches your 
stocking measures, multiply one number by the 
other, and the product will be the whole number 
of stitches necessary to knit a stocking of the same 
size as your own cotton pattern. 



As an example : If your sample counts 16 
stitches to the inch, and your pattern stocking 
measures 10^2 inches around, then it follows that 
the whole number of stitches needed is 168. 

Rule I. for Knitting Ladies' Silk 
Stockings. 

Cast 169 stitches on 3 needles and knit around 
once plain; then knit in ribs, alternating 4 stitches 
plain and 2 purl for 10 rounds; then knit plain 
(purling one stitch in each round in the middle 
of one needle, which forms the seam), until the 
leg is 12 inches long ; then decrease one stitch 
each side of the seam in every third round until the 
whole number of stitches is reduced to 113. The 
manner of decreasing at each side of the seam is as 
follows: Commence on the seam needle and knit 
all but 3 stitches on the right of the seam, then si 
and b (to narrow) and k 1 ; now purl the seam stitch, 
then k 1 and n again, which completes the operation 
of decreasing for one round. Then knit 4^ inches 
and commence the heel, by taking 28 stitches 
each side of the seam on one needle, making 57 in 
all; * purl across, knit the seam stitch in this 
row, and knit back plain, purl the seam stitch in 
this row, then repeat from * until 57 rows are 
done, counting each time across as a row. 

In knitting the heel, the first stitch in each row, 
whether it be a knitted or a purled row, should be 
slipped. 

Now commence to decrease as follows: 

Fifty-eighth row. — K 13, si and b, k 10, n, k 1, 
p 1, k 1, si and b, k 10. n, k 13. 

Fifty-ninth row. — P 26, k 1, p 26. 

Sixtieth roiv. — K 13, si and b, k 8, n, k 1, p 1, 
k 1, si and b, k 8, n, k 13. 

Sixty-first row. — P 24, k 1, p 24. 

Sixty-second row. — K 13, si and b, k 6, n, k 1, 
p 1, k 1, si and b, k 6, n, k 13. 

Sixty-third row. — P 22, k 1, p 22. 

Sixty-fourth row. — K 13, si and b, k 4, n, k 1, 
p 1, k 1, si and b, k 4, n, k 13. 

Sixty-fifth row. — P 20, k 1, p 20. 

Sixty-sixth row. — K 13, si and b, k 2, n, k 1, p 1, 
k 1, si and b, k 2, n, k 13. 

Sixty-seventh rou<. — P 18, k 1, p 18. 

Sixty-eighth row. — K 13, si and b, n, k 1, p 1, 
k 1, si and b, n, k 13. 

Sixty-ninth row. — P 16, k 1, p 16. 

Seventieth row. — Commence by knitting 17; after 
this proceed as in Rule I. given for gentlemen's silk 
socks on page 53, beginning at the point marked ***. 

Extra Rule for Knitting the Toe of a 
Stocking. 

The method of knitting the toe, in the preceding 
rules, will produce stockings resembling the best 
French woven goods, but as many prefer a differ- 
ent style, we give the following, which is also very 
good for finishing off a mitten in the hand: 

Commence at corner of the instep needle. The 
manner of decreasing each side of seam — referred 



56 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



to before — is as follows: Commence on the seam 
needle and knit all but 3 stitches on the right 
of the seam, then si and b to narrow, and k 1 ; now 
purl the seam stitch, then k 1 and n again, which 
completes the operation of decreasing for one 
round. 

First round. — K 7, n, repeat until the number of 
stitches on all the needles is reduced so as to be 
divisible by 9, and knit balance of round plain. 
In case the number of stitches on the needles is 
already divisible by 9, then the 1st and 2nd 
rounds should be omitted, commencing at once 
with the 3rd round instead of the first. 

Second rowid. — Knit plain. 

Third round. — K 7, n, and repeat; knit 7 rounds 
plain. 

Eleventh round. — K 6, n, 
rounds plain. 

Eighteenth round. — K 5, n 
rounds plain. 

Twenty-fourth round. — K 4, 
rounds plain. 

Now narrow once on each needle in every round 
until only 4 stitches are left; then narrow twice on 
each needle, and cast off. When decreasing once 
only on each needle, do not narrow at the same 
point in every round, but at a different place in 
each successive round. 

Rule for Knitting Heels. 



repeat, and knit 

repeat, and knit 

n, repeat, and knit 



Decreasing in the heel is made at four points in 
every row where plain knitting is done, no de- 
crease being made in the purled rows. 

The number of stitches in a heel should always 
be odd, the central or seam stitch dividing the 
whole number into two sections, each containing 
an even number of stitches. 

The decreasing should be done at two points in 
each section, once next the seam, and again at a 
point about one-half way between this decrease 
and the edge of the heel on either side the seam, 
thus disposing of 4 stitches in each decreased row. 
The first stitch on either side of the seam should 
be knit plain in every decreased row. 

The manner of decreasing is shown in Rule I, 
and to further illustrate the principle which 
should govern the work in hand, the details are 
given below for completing the heel of a child's 
stocking with 5-inch foot. (See table, page 58.) 

The number of stitches in this heel is 39. After 
completing 39 rows, decrease as follows: 

Fortieth row. — K 8, si and b, k 6, n, k 1, pi, 
k 1, si and b, k 6, n, k 8. 

Forty -first row. — P 17, k 1, p 17. 

Forty-second row. — K 8, si and b, k 4, n, k 1, 
p 1, k 1, si and b, k 4, n, k 8. 

Forty-third row. — P 15, k 1, p 15. 

Forty-fourth row. — K 8, si and b, k 2, n, k 1, 
p 1, k 1, si and b, k 2, n, k 8. 

Fo)-ty-fifth row. — P 13, k 1, p 13. 

Forty-sixth renv. — K 8, si and b, n, k 1, p 1, k 1, 
si and b, n, k 8. 

Forty-seventh row. — P n, k 1, p n. 



Forty-eighth row. — Commence by knitting 12; 
after this proceed as in Rule I. for gentlemen's silk 
socks, from point marked ***. The number of 
stitches on the needles will be much less than in 
this rule, however, and that number will be de- 
creased to shape the instep until only 78 stitches 
remain. 

It will be observed that the number of stitches 
in the heel between the two points of decrease, 
diminishes by two in each section or four in each 
decreased row, until none are left, the two points 
of decrease coming in contact. This forms, when 
the heel is complete, " gores," which come together 
on both sides the heel at the bottom like letter V. 
Thus it will be seen that whenever the point of the 
V-shaped figure is reached, no further decrease is 
needed, and the next step is to purl back one row, 
and commence the following row by knitting one- 
half the number of stitches and one more ; then 
fold the needles and cast off as described in the 
rule mentioned." 

Rule II. for Knitting Ladies' Plain 
Stockings. 

For a medium size cast 152 stitches upon 3 
needles, putting 50 on each of 2 needles and 52 on 
the third. Knit round once plain, catching up the 
short end left from casting on the stitches, and 
knitting it in with the regular thread. 

Second round. — Knit 2, seam 2 around the work. 
Repeat the ribbing until you have knitted a section 
about 2 inches deep, and finish it with a round of 
seaming. Mark the center stitch (the first one cast 
on), and knit round and round plain until you 
have about 12 inches in depth, always seaming the 
ce?iter stitch. 

For the next routid. — Begin to narrow as follows: 
Seam 1 (the center stitch), knit 2 separately, knit 2 
together; then knit plain until 4 stitches of the 
round remain; knit 2 of these together and 2 plain. 

Next five rounds. — -Same as those above the last 
round. 

Next round. — Narrow as before. There must be 
15 or 16 narrowing rounds, with 5 of the other 
rounds between every succeeding 2 narrowing 
rounds. This will bring the work to the ankle, 
and there should now be about 120 stitches on the 
needles. 

For the Ankle. — Knit plain, seaming the center 
stitch, until about 3 inches have been worked. 

The length of the stocking from the top to the 
beginning of the heel should measure from 22 to 
23 inches, according to the requirements of the 
figure. 

For the Heel. — Divide as follows: Seam 1 (the 
center stitch)', knit 30 plain and leave the rest 
of the stitches on the needle. Seam the 30 back 
to beginning of the round, knit 1 for the seam, 
and seam 30 on the other side of the seam-stitch. 
The heel is formed of these 61 stitches. Knit as 
follows: 

First row. — Knit 30, seam 1, knit 30. 

Second row. — Seam 30, knit 1, seam 30. (Fewer 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



57 



or more stitches may be divided off for the heel, 
according to the size of the foot). 

Knit these two rows alternately for about an 
inch, and then begin to narrow as follows, having 
30 stitches on one needle and 31 on the other: 
Knit 26, knit 2 together, knit 2 separately, seam 1, 
knit 2 separately, knit 2 together, knit 26 plain. 

Next three rows. — Seam all except the center 
stitch, which knit. Knit all except the center 
stitch, which seam. Seam all except the center 
stitch, which knit. 

Next row. — Narrow as before. Make 5 or 6 
narrowing rows, with 3 rows as just given after 
each narrowing row. The heel should now meas- 
ure about 2^ inches deep. Close the heel thus: 
Knit to within 1 stitch of the center; then knit 
this 1 stitch, the seam-stitch and the next stitch 
beyond, together. Now fold the heel so that the 
two needles face each other and the stitches on 
each are exactly opposite each other. Then knit 2 
stitches together at once, 1 from each needle, at 
the same time binding them off. Bind off all the 
stitches in this way until 1 stitch is left on the 
needle. Now turn the heel sideways and pick up 
about 27 stitches along its side, proceeding from 
right to left. Pick up 3 stitches at the corner of 
the heel for a gusset. Knit all the stitches left 
upon the needle until the other corner of the heel 



is reached, where you pick up 3 more stitches for a 
gusset. Next pick up 27 stitches upon the other 
side of the heel, thus completing 1 round. The 
needles should now contain about 120 stitches. 
Knit plain rounds for about 4 inches, and then 
begin to narrow for the toe as follows: Knit 2 
together, knit 8 separately, and repeat to end of 
round. Knit 8 rounds plain. Knit 2 together, 
knit 7 separately, and repeat for the round. Knit 
7 rounds plain. Knit 2 together, knit 6 separately, 
and repeat for the round. Knit 6 rounds plain. 
Knit 2 together, knit 5 separately. Knit 5 rounds 
plain. Knit 2 together, knit 4 separately, knit 4 
rounds plain. After this divide every round into 
thirds, and narrow once in each third. Continue 
in this way until each needle contains 2 stitches. 
Break off the thread, and with a darning-needle 
draw it through the 6 stitches, drawing them to a 
point, and fastening the thread on the inside of the 
stocking. 

The heel and toe may be made of white. 
Clocks may be embroidered at the sides in bright 
or dull colors. In place of the ribbing at the top a 
fancy pattern may be knitted; and a similar pat- 
tern may be made down the front and over the 
instep or ankle. The introduction of fancy knit- 
ting will in no way interfere with the directions 
here given for shaping the stocking. 



HOW TO Wft$H $ILtf tfNlTTeD fl^Tl(LG5. 



Wash in cool, soft water, with pure, white castile 
soap, ox gall, or fine toilet soap, and use no more 
of either ingredient than necessary to make a nice 
suds. Rub as little as possible; press the water 
out of the articles by placing them in a clean, 
dry cloth; do not wring, but squeeze them. Wash 
each one separately. Rinse once in clear cold 
water, and again in cold water which has been 
tinctured with some mild acid; cream of tartar, 



tartaric acid, alum or vinegar will do. Dry quick- 
ly. When nearly dry, rub with a piece of soft, 
dry flannel, always the same way. If you desire 
to press the article, lay it in or under a heavy 
book. Do not press with a very hot iron, as it 
gives the article a starched appearance. Use 
no acid for black, but add a little liquid ammo- 
nia to the washing water. Use no ammonia for 
colors. 



how ro Wa$h Wool tfNirreD a^ticlgs. 



For the first cleaning of wool knitted articles in 
white or light colors, a "dry wash" is recom- 
mended. This is done with flour, meal or corn 
starch, the article being dipped into either and 
rubbed gently with the hands until it looks clean 
and fresh. Then shake out. 

When it becomes necessary to use soap and 
water, select castile for the former and have the 
latter luke-warm. Make a suds of the soap and 
add a little ammonia or borax — preferably the 
latter — to the suds. Then immerse the article to 
be washed and allow it to soak for a few minutes. 
Gently squeeze, but do not rub it, until it looks 



clean. Then rinse in water of the same tempera- 
ture and squeeze as dry as possible; do not wring. 
The article may be straightened out, folded in 
a towel and pressed firmly with the hands with 
advantageous results, before hanging it up to dry. 
The drying should be done as quickly as possible, 
and it is well to occasionally pull or stretch the 
article into shape while it is drying. 

It is a very good plan to shrink wool that is to be 
knit into undergarments before using it. Dip the 
skeins into hot water, squeeze out and hang in the air 
to dry. Garments made from wool that has been thus 
treated will shrink comparatively little when washed. 



58 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



CALCULATION IN KNITTING. 



Table showing Number of Stitches required for Stockings of Various Sizes (Ladies', Misses' and Children's) 
made with No. 19 Knitting Needles, and Knitting Silk of the usual size. 



5 In. 
Foot. 


5\£ In. 
Foot. 


fi In. 
Foot. 


6V£ In. 

Foot. 


7 In. 
Foot. 


7^ In. 
Foot. 


8 In. 
Foot. 


8)4 In. 
Foot. 


9 In. 
Foot. 


108 


112 


116 


124 


132 


140 


148 


156 


162 


140 


150 


160 


185 


190 


200 


210 


220 


230 


250 


265 


295 


340 


355 


370 


380 


390 


400 


78 


82 


86 


90 


94 


98 


102 


106 


110 


39 


41 


43 


45 


47 


49 


51 


53 


55 


39 


41 


43 


45 


47 


49 


51 


53 


55 


Hi in- 


m in - 


l|f in. 


lfcf in. 


11* in- 


1»* in- 


11* in. 


11* in. 


11* in. 


3 m.H 


m in - 


4A in. 


Hi in. 


5A in. 


51* in. 


6 2 V in. 


61* in. 


7A in. 



/0. 
f 

n 

2' 

/ 
i 

lit 
1% 



Number of stitches required for top of 
stocking, 

Number of rounds before beginning to nar- 
row for ankle, including 20 rounds ribbed, 

Whole number of rounds before beginning 
heel, 

Number of stitches in ankle, after narrow- 



ing, 



Number of stitches in heel, including center 

or seam stitch, 

Number of rows in heel, before narrowing, 

counting each time across 

Length of toe, from beginning of narrowing 

to point, 

Length of foot, before beginning to narrow for 

toe, including width of heel at widest point, 



169 

240 

410 

113 

57 

57 

1U in. 

71* in. 



The methods of narrowing in the leg, heel and foot have been given in the preceding pages in general and special 
instructions, and will not need repeating here; and besides, the average knitter will know, without further directions, 
just where and how to manage this part of the work. The beginner will find the information she seeks in the 
instructions referred to. 



Table showing Number of Stitches required for Stockings of Various Sizes (Ladies', Misses' and Children's) 

made with No. 22 Needles, and Fine Knitting Silk. 





5 In. 

Foot. 


E% In. 
Foot. 


6 In. 

Foot. 


GU In. 
Foot. 


7 In. 
Foot. 


m In. 
Foot. 


8 In. 
Foot. 


8^ In. 
Foot. 


9 In. 
Foot. 


9*4 In. 
Foot. 


Number of stitches required for top of 


135 


140 


145 


155 


165 


175 


185 


195 


202 


210 


Number of rounds before beginning to nar- 






















row for ankle, including 24 rounds ribbed, 


168 


180 


192 


222 


228 


240 


252 


264 


276 


288 


Whole number of rounds before beginning 
























300 


318 


354 


408 


426 


. 444 


456 


468 


480 


492 


Number of stitches in ankle, after narrow- 
























98 
49 
49 


102 

51 
51 


108 
55 
55 


113 

57 
57 


118 
59 
59 


122 

_• 61 
61 


127 
63 
63 


132 
67 
67 


137 
69 
69 


142 


Number of stitches in heel, including center 
or seam stitch, 


71 


Number of rows in heel, before narrowing, 


71 


Length of toe, from beginning of narrowing 

Length of foot, before beginning to narrow for 
toe, including width of heel at widest point, 


l**in. 
31* in. 


11* in. 
31* in. 


11* in. 

4 S 8 T in. 


11* in. 

41* in. 


11* in. 
5,V in. 


11* in. 
51* in. 


11* in- 
6 2 \ in. 


11* in. 

61* in. 


1H in. 
7*V in - 


11* in- 

71* in. 



It must be remembered that the specifications in the above tables refer to the work of knitters who knit neither 
too loosely nor too tightly, but with an even and elastic result. Those who knit very tightly may need to increase the 
number of stitches given, while those who knit loosely may be compelled to undo their work and finish with fewer 
stitches than those above named. 



6 

J 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



59 



hooD$, (ftpe<;, <jhaWl<$, jA(K!eT<;, fa^inatoi^;, pstti- 

(OAT$, LGGGING^, <JLIPPei^, GT(., ef(\ 



In making the garments and articles illustrated 
and described in this department, the knitter need 
not confine herself to the colors and materials 
named, when, according to her taste and judgment, 




No. 1. — Ladies' Knitted Chenille Hood. 

others may be substituted. Owing to the fact that 
two people rarely knit alike, we have not deemed it 
advisable to give quantities. These may be ascer- 
tained at any store where wool or silk knitting ma- 
terials are kept, as the people in charge, from the 
continuous sales of materials for various purposes, 
can in almost every instance name accurate quan- 
' tities for different varieties of work. 

Ladies' Knitted Chenille Hood. 

Nos. i and 2. — The hood illustrated is made of 
pale-blue chenille and knittted back and forth, plain 
(see No. 2), on large ivory or bone needles. Cast 
on sufficient stitches to make the work wide enough 
f to reach around the head from side to side, back of 
the face. Knit as directed until the piece is long 
enough to cover the head and form the frill and 
cape as seen at figure No. 1. In finishing the 
upper part of the piece the corners may be round- 
ed by narrowing them off; or, if finished squarely, 



they may be turned under when adding the outside 
to the lining. The latter is made of silk of the 
same color as the chenille. The chenille portion 
may be gathered to it at the top and the back of 
the neck as seen in the picture, and then a lining 
may be added to the cape-portion. A border of the 
chenille may be sewed over-and-over about the 
edges. Finish the hood at the top and the back of 
the neck with loops of ribbon, and add ties of the 
same to the lower corners of the front, catching 
the corners to those of the lining when joining the 
ties. Cream-white, pale-yellow, rose-color, lavender 
or any soft tint is pretty for an evening hood knit- 
ted in this manner. 

If preferred, a lining of the silk may be added 
as follows: Cut it the size and shape of the knit- 
ted portion and fell it in flatly. Then plait the 
hood over the forehead as seen in the picture. 
Add a casing or strip of the silk at the back of the 
neck for the insertion of a rubber strap 4^ 
inches long by which the hood is drawn into shape. 
Then add the loops and ties of ribbon as directed. 

Eider-down wool, knitted in the same way in 
any color desired would make a comfortable hood. 




No. 2 — Detail for Knitting Hood. 

An edging of Shetland or Ice wool could be added, 
and the lining either omitted or crocheted* with 
Shetland wool or Saxony yarn. 



60 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted Shoulder-Cape. 

No. 3. — The cape illustrated is made of Ger- 
mantown wool, and is knitted as follows: (Use 
quite coarse needles and work rather loosely). 




No. 3. — Knitted Shoulder-Cape. 

Cast on 64 stitches, and knit across once, plain, 
and seam back. Knit in this order uncil there are 
10 rows. This will form one ridge or rib. Now 
reverse the order of the knitting and sea?n one row 
and knit one row until there are 6 rows, or a 
second rib. Repeat these two ribs alternately 
until there are 63 of them knitted and seamed, 
altogether. 

In the last row of seaming, in the 63rd rib, bind 
off as follows: Bind off 3 stitches very loosely, and 
then drop a stitch from off the left-hand needle. 
* Now pass the stitch on the right-hand needle onto 
the left-hand needle and knit it off, also loosely. 
Now bind off 2 more stitches, drop the next stitch 
and repeat from * until within 9 stitches from 
the top; then bind these off in the regular way. 

Now pull or pick out the dropped stitches en- 
tirely across the work, and the ribs will assume the 
effect of soft open puffs. 

To Finish the Neck. — Make single crochets 
across the top, arranging the crochets so as to 
draw the cape in to the size of the neck. Then 
make a treble crochet in the top of every under 
rib, with 2-chains between. Finish with shells 
made of 6 double crochets in every other space, 
with a single crochet in each alternate space. 
Edge the shells with a single crochet in the top 
of each double, and make a single crochet over or 
around every single crochet underneath. Run a 
ribbon in the spaces and tie it in a bow. 

To Make the Fringe. — Begin with a half-double 
crochet drawn out very long, and then make a 
chain of 20 stitches and another half-double in the 
3rd stitch of the cape. 



Repeat chains and half-doubles across the cape, 
as seen in the picture. 

Ladies' Knitted Vest. 

No. 4. — Use Belding's knitting silk and two No. 
17 steel needles, 12 inches long. 

The front and back of the vest are made alike in 
2 pieces, each knitted straight, from the lower edge 
to the neck, when the shaping of the latter and the 
shoulder straps begins as below directed. The gar- 
ment is sewed or crocheted together under the 
arms and on the shoulders, and a gusset, knitted 
separately, is joined in each under-arm seam at the 
bottom of the vest, to give breadth at the hips. A 
very slender figure will not require these gussets. 

Cast on loosely, 200 stitches, and knit back plain. 

Second row. — Work in rib style as follows: K 3, 
p 2 alternately across the row. Work back, knit- 
ting the purled stitches and purling the knitted ones. 

Work in this manner for 24 inches. Then knit 
off 50 stitches in the usual manner, leaving the 
remaining 150 on the needle, and put a cork on 
each end of the needle so that the stitches will not 
slip off. Now knit to shape the neck edge and 
shoulder strap as follows: 

Work back and forth in rib style as before, on 
the 50 stitches, narrowing once every time you 
reach the neck-edge, until there are 20 stitches on 
the needle. Then rib for 6 inches and bind off. 

Next cast 
off loosely 
100 stitches 
of those left 
on the first 
needle, and 
on the re- 
maining 50 
work in 
rib style 
to corre- 
spond with 
the other 
side, being 
careful to 
narrow at 
the neck- 
edge as be- 
fore. This 
completes 
one half of 
the vest. 
Make the 
other half 




No. 4. — Ladies' Knitted Test. 



to corre- 
spond and 
join under 

the arms as described after making the gussets as 
follows: Cast on loosely 50 stitches for each, and 
rib the same as in the body portion for about an 
inch. Continue to rib, narrowing once at the be- 
ginning of every row, until but 1 stitch is left. 
Insert the gussets in the lower part of the seam 
with the lower edges of the portions together. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



61 



Now fill in the neck of the vest in crochet as 
follows: Begin at the lower right hand corner and 
make i double crochet, 5 chain, 1 double, and so 
on across the work making the doubles in the ribs. 
Break the silk at the end of this and every row. 

Second to Ninth row inclusive. — Work same as 
first row except that the doubles are made under 
the 5-chains. Increase at the beginning and end 
of each row by 1 extra 5 -chain and 1 double. 

Now join each shoulder by making a chain of 



Ladies' Knitted Square Shawl. 

No. 5. — This is a light yet warm shawl made of 
Shetland wool and measuring 18 inches square, 
without the border. The engraving shows it as it 
appears when doubled for wearing. The square 
for the center is in blackberry pattern; the border 
is worked separately. 

For the blackberry pattern cast on about 128 
stitches, or any number divisible by 4, and 1 extra 




the 

length 
required 
to reach 
over the 
shoulder from 
front to back. Work 
back and forth on 
this chain the same as 
for the front, in 5-chains 
and double crochets, fasten- 
ing also at the shoulder edges, 
until the two are joined clear 
across by a band of openwork. 

Now work around the neck edge 
row of double crochets, placing them 
closely together — one in every stitch. 

Next row. — * Make 1 double into each of 
the 2 doubles underneath, 5 chain, skip 5 dou- 
bles and repeat from * entirely across the row. 

Next row. — * make 1 double into each of the 
2 doubles underneath, 1 chain, 4 doubles, each 
separated by 1 chain into third of 5 -chain, 1 chain 
and repeat from *. 

Next row. — * 1 double into each of the 2 
doubles underneath, 1 chain, 4 doubles each 
separated by 1 chain into the center of the 4 
doubles underneath, 1 chain, and repeat from * 
Repeat this last row once more, then add a row 
of scollops as follows: Make about 15 doubles 
in the center of each group of the 4 doubles 
underneath, and fasten down to doubles of previous 
row with single crochets. 

Add a similar row of scollops to the edge of each 
sleeve. Run ribbon into the holes about the neck 
as seen in the engraving. 

Finish the lower edge with several rows of the 
open-work crochet and a row of scollops. 



'♦. # 



at each 
end to 
keep the 
sides even. 
First rmv. — Slip 
1, * knit 1, purl 
and knit 1 in the 
next stitch, purl 3 to- 
gether ; repeat from * and 
finish at the end with knit 1. 
Second row— Purl across the row. 
Third row. — Slip 1, * purl 3 
together, knit 1, purl 1 and knit 
1 in the next stitch; repeat from 
and finish at the end with knit 1. 
Fourth row. — Purl across the whole row. 
Continue from the first row 1 until you 
have worked the square, then cast off. 
The border must be worked in two pieces, as 
it is more convenent not to have such a large num- 
ber of stitches on the needle at once as would be 
needed to go round the shawl. 

Cast on 232 stitches for the border. 
First row. — Knit. 

Second row. — Knit 1, make 1; (to make 1, put 
the thread over, and knit it as a stitch in next row) 
* knit 2, knit 3 together, knit 2, make 1, knit 1, 
make 1; repeat from * to end of row. 
Third row. — Purl. 
Fourth row. — Like second row. 
Fifth row. — Knit; repeat from second row 6 
times more. This will bring you to the 30th row. 
Thirtieth row. — Knit. 
Thirty-first row. — Purl. 

Thirty-second to Thirty-ninth rows. — Make r, knit 
2 together, throughout each row. 
Fortieth row. — Knit. 
Forty-first row. — Purl. 



62 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Forty-second row. — Purl. 
Forty-third row. — Knit. 
Forty-fourth row. — Like thirty-second. 
Forty-fifth row. — Knit, then cast off. 
The joining of the two pieces of border should 
be placed at opposite corners. 

Design for a Shawl Center. 

No. 6. — Cast on 10 stitches for each division of 
the pattern, using Andalusian or Shetland wool 
and 2 No. 8 wooden needles. 

First row. — K 2 together, th o, k 3, th o, k 3, 
k 2 together. 

Second, Fourth, Sixth, Fighth, Tenth and Twelfth 
ro7os. — Purl. 

Third row. — K 2 together, k 1, th o, k 4, th o, 
k 1, k 2 together. 

Fifth row. — K 2 together, th o, k 6, th o, k 2 
together. 

Seventh roiiv. — K 1, th o, k 2, k 2 together twice, 
k 2, th o, k 1. 

Ninth row. — K 2, th o, k 1, k 2 together twice, 
k 1, th o, k 2. 

Elevetith row. — K 3, th o, k 2 together twice, 
th o, k 3. 

After knitting the 12th row, repeat from the 3rd 
row for all the work. 

Knitted Bed Room Slippers. 

Nos. 7, 8 and 9. — Use single zephyr or Ger- 
mantown wool in blue and 
white, and steel needles, in 
knitting these slippers. 

Commence the slipper at 
the toe with blue wool. Cast 
on 10 stitches. Increase 1 
stitch by putting the wool 
over the needle at the begin- 
ning of each row. No. 8 
shows the outside of work, 
and No. 9 the inside, with 



Second row. — Make 1, knit 1, * take the double 
white wool, turn it twice over the needle to form a 
loop about Y^ inch deep (see design) ; with the left 
hand needle pass the last knitted loop over the 4 




No. G. — Design for a Shawl Center. 





No. 1. — Knitted Bed room Slipper. 



No. 8. — Outside of Slipper. 




No. 9.— Inside of Slipper. 

loops of the white wool. When knitting with the white 
wool take it from two balls so as to have two threads. 
First row. — Knit plain. 



loops of white, knit 2 ; repeat from * to the end of 
the row. 

Third row. — Make 1 at the beginning of the row, 
slip the loops of white wool, knit the blue; in knit- 
ting the blue stitch, pass the blue wool with which 
you are knitting round the double white wool; in 
knitting the next stitch this will draw up the white 
wool close to the work, and so carry it to the other 
side to be ready for working the next row of loops. 

Fourth row. — Make 1, knit the blue stitches plain, 
knit the 4 white loops at the back as 1 stitch. 

Fifth row. — Make 1, knit to the end of the row. 
Repeat from second row, increasing at the begin- 
ning of each row until the work is wide enough 
across the instep. 

Now divide the stitches for the sides, casting off 
10 in the center; with the third needle continue to 
work on the side stitches as before, without increase 
or decrease, until you have the length from the 
instep to the back of heel; then cast off and work 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



63 



the other side in the same way; sew the two sides 
together at the back with a needle and wool. 

Now pick up the stitches round the top of slip- 
per on 3 needles and with a 4th needle and blue 
wool knii 10 rounds and cast off. Turn this plain 
piece over and hem it down to the top of inside of 
slipper to form a roll round the edge. Sew the 

bottom of the slipper 
neatly and firmly to 
a strong cork sole 
lined with wool. 



BWBBiBiiWHP^ 




Ladies' Fancy 
Mittens. 



Silk 



■ •■ ' HI 

raH '-If 

1. vf 



^ 



No. 10. — Four No. 
19 knitting needles 
will be needed in 
knitting these mittens. 
Cast on to each of 
2 needles 25 stitches, 
and on the 3rd needle 
30 stitches, making 
80 in all. Knit 5 
rounds plain for a 
hem at the top. 

Sixth round. — N, o, 
repeat. Knit 7 rounds 
plain. 

Fourteenth, Fif- 
teenth, Sixteenth and 
Seventeenth rounds. — 
SI and b, k 3, o, repeat. 
Eighteenth round. — 
Knit plain. 

Nineteenth round. — 
K 2, n, o, k 1, repeat. 
Twentieth round. — 
K 1, n, o, k 2, repeat. 
Twenty-first romid. 
— N, o, k 2, repeat. 
Knit 9 rounds plain. 
Thirty-first round. — Th o, k 3, n, repeat. 
Thirty-second round. — K 1, o, k 2, n, repeat. 
Thirty-third round.- — K 2, o, k 1, n^ repeat. 
Thirty-fourth round. — K 3, o, n, repeat. Knit 2 
rounds plain. 

The last 6 rounds are repeated 7 times to com- 
plete the pattern in the wrist. The fancy stripe in 
the back of hand requires 31 stitches. There are 
n repetitions of the pattern, which are knit in 6 
rounds each as follows: 

First round. — SI and b, k 3, o, si and b, k 3, o, k 2, o, 
k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 2, o, k 3, n, o, k 3, n. 
Second round. — SI and b, k 2, o, k 1, si and b, k 2, 
o, k 13, o, k 2, n, k 1, o, k 2, n. 

Third round. — SI and b, k 1, o, k 2, si and b, k 1, 
th o, k 4, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 4, 
o, k 1, n, k 2, o, k 1, n. 

Fourth round. — SI and b, o, k 3, si and b, o, k 17, 
o, n, k 3, o, n. 

Fifth round. — K 12, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si st 
over, k 2, o, k 12. 
Sixth round. — K 31. 



No. 10. 



-Ladies' Fancy Silk 
Kitten. 



The fancy design at end of stripe is knit on the 
same 31 stitches in rounds as follows: 

First round. — K 1, si and b, k 3, o, si and b, k 2, 
o, k 2, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 2, o, 
k 2, n, o, k 3, n, k 1. 

Second round. — K 1, si and b, k 2, o, k 1, si and b, 
k 1, o, k 13, o, k 1, n, k 1, o, k 2, n, k 1. 

Third round. — K 1, si and b, k 1, o, k 2, si and b, 
o, k 4, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 4, o, n, 
k 2, o, k 1, n, k 1. 

Fourth round. — K 1, si and b, o, k 25, o, n, k 1. 

Fifth round. — K 12, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, 
k 2, o, k 12. 

Sixth round. — K 31. 

Seventh round. — K 2, si and b, k 3, o, si and b, k 1, 
o, k 2, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 2, o, 
k 1, n, o, k 3, n, k 2. 

Eighth round. — K 2, si and b, k 2, o, k 1, si and b, 
o, k 13, o, n, k 1, o, k 2, n, k 2. 

IVinth round.- — K 2, si and b, k 1, o, k 7, o, k 2, 
si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 7, o, k 1, n, k 2. 

Tenth round. — K 2, si and b, o, k 23, o, n, k 2. 

Eleventh round. — K 12, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si st 
over, k 2, o, k 12. 

Twelfth round. — K 31. 

Thirteenth round. — K 3, si and b, k 3, o, si and b, 
o,- k 2, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 2, o, 
n, o, k 3, n, k 3. 

Foicrteenth round.- — K 3, si and b, k 2, o, k 17, o, 
k 2, n, k 3. 

Fifteenth round. — K 3, si and b, k 1, o, k 6, o, k 2, 
si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 6, o, k 1, n, k 3. 

Sixteenth round. — K 3, si and b, o, k 21, o, n, k 3. 

Seventeenth round. — K 12, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass si 
st over, k 2, o, k 12. 

Eighteenth round. — K 31. 

Nineteenth roimd. — K 5, si and b, k 3, o, k 2, o, 
k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 2, o, k 3, n, k 5. 

Twentieth round. — K 5, si and b, k 2, o, k 13, o, 
k 2, n, k 5. 

Twenty- first roicnd. — K 5, si and b, k 1, o, k 4, o, 
k 2, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 2, o, k 4, o, k 1, n, k 5. 

Twenty-second round. — K 5, si and b, o, k 1 7, o, n, k 5. 

Twenty-third round. — K 12, o, k 2, si 1, n, pass 
si st over, k 2, o, k 12. 

Twenty-fourth round. — K 31. 

Twenty-fifth round. — K 31. 

Twenty-sixth round. — K 6, si and b, k 3, o, k 2, 
o, k 1, si 1, n, pass si st over, k 1, o, k 2, o, k 3, n, k 6. 

Twenty -seventh round. — K 6, si and b, k 2, o, 
k it, o, k 2, n, k 6. 

Twenty-eighth round. — K6, si and b, k 1, o, k 13, 
o, k 1, n, k 6. 

Twenty-ninth round. — K 6, si and b, o, k 6, o, 
si 1, n, pass si st over, o, k 6, o, n, k 6. 

Thirtieth round. — K 31, 

Thirty-first round. — K 7, si and b, k 3, o, k 7, o, 
k 3, n, k 7. 

Thirty-second round. — K 7, si and b, k 2, o, k 9, 
o, k 2, n, k 7. 

Thirty-third round. — K 7, si and b, k 1, o, k 11, 
o, k 1, n, k 7. 

Thirty-fourth round. — K 7, si and b, o, k 13, o, n, k 7. 

Thiriy-fifth round. — K 31. 



64 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Thirty-sixth round. — K 10, si and b, k 3, o, k 1, 
o, k 3, n, k 10. 

Thirty-seventh round. — K 10, si and b, k 2, o, k 3, 
o, k 2, n, k 10. 




No. 11.— Knitted Fascinator. 



Thirty-eighth round. — K 10, si and b, k 1, o, k 5, 
o, k 1, n, k 10. 

Thirty-ninth round. — K 10, si and b, o, k 7,0, n, k 10. 

Fortieth round. — K 31. 

Forty-first round. — K 13, si and b, o, k 1, o, n, k 13. 

Forty-second round. — K 3 1 . 

All other portions of this mitten are knit plain 
(see general instructions page 51). When shaping 
the tip of hand decrease only in the plain portions 
of the work. The wrist and fancy back are lined 
in manner described at No. 23 on page 70. 

Eighty stitches at the wrist make a mitten of 
size No. 6y 2 to No. 7. More or less stitches must 
be used to make a larger or smaller mitten care be- 
ing taken to keep the whole number divisible by 6. 

Knitted Fascinator. 

No. 11. — This fascinator, as represented, is made 
of single Germantown yarn used double. If pre- 
ferred, it may be used single, or single zephyr 
may be selected instead of Germantown yarn, if 
the knitter desires. 

Cast on 93 stitches. (For a larger or smaller 
fascinator cast on more or fewer stitches.) Use 
bone or wooden needles of good size. 

To obtain the shape of the fascinator, the better 
plan is to cut a pattern from paper, making it 46^2 
inches across the front or longest edge, and 12 
inches from the center point to the front edge, 
sloping the sides regularly from the center point to 
the ends. Work back and forth in plain knitting 
for 4 rows (or 2 ribs), without decreasing. Then, 
continuing to knit plain, narrow once or twice at 
the end of each row, as the shape of the pattern 



necessitates, until you reach the center point. 

There should now be 50 rows of knitting or 

25 ribs. 

To make the Fringe. — Crochet very loosely, 

chains of 9 stitches, 
catching them 
along the edge 
with single cro- 
chets, at intervals 
that will cause the 
fringe to fall as 
seen in the picture. 
By increasing 
the fascinator in 
• size, it may be used 
as a shoulder shawl. 
White or colored 
yarn may be se- 
lected for making 
it, according to in- 
dividual taste. 

Ladies' Knitted 
Short Drawers. 

No. 12. — These 
drawers are knit- 
ted with red and 
white wool, in 
patent knitting, with the waistband and lower edge 
in ribbed pattern. Begin from the upper edge by 
casting on 188 stitches with the red wool. 

First row. — Knit. 

Second row. — With white wool knit 1, purl 1 and 
repeat across the row. 

Third to Thirtieth rows. — Like the preceding, 
except that the last row is knitted with red wool. 

Thirty-first 
row. — Join the 
white wool. Slip 
1, throw wool 
forward, slip 1, 
inserting the 
needle as for 
purling, knit \X\ 
repeat across the 
row. 

Thirty-second 
row. — Slip 1 ; 
then, alternately, 
wool forward, slip 
the stitch knitted 
in the last row, 
knit 2 together 
and repeat. 

Thirty-third to 
Two Hundred 
and Fighty-eighth 
row. — Like the 
preceding, but 

after the 192nd row, the work is divided in two 
parts, each of which is continued separately. Then 
follow 36 rows like those which formed the waist- 
band, the first and last being knitted with red wool. 




No. 



n w i wmgiiii B 



12. — Ladjes, Knitted Short 
Drawers. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



65 




«8^r 



No. 13. — Knitted Petticoat. 



Knitted Petticoat, with Detail. 

Nos. 13 and 14. — This pretty petticoat is knit- 
ted with coarse steel or medium-sized bone needles, 
and will generally be made of Germantown wool, in 

any color 
p ref erred, 
such as 
cream, scar- 
let, salmon, 
t u rquois e- 
blue, brown 
or gray. 

The work 
is done in 
stripes, 
which are 
begun at the 
top; and af- 
ter a suffi- 
cient number 
are made, 
they are cro- 
cheted to- 
gether. Each 
stripe is fin- 
ished at the 
bottom with 
a fancy bor- 
der, which is 
a continuation of the stripe; and after the stripes 
are all joined, the lower edge of the border is turned 
up underneath and hemmed down so as to show 
only the open work at the bottom of the petticoat, 
as seen in the engravings — No. 13 showing the petti- 
coat fully completed, and No. 14 the lower por- 
tion of a stripe with the border turned up as above 
described. 

Begin a stripe by casting on 64 stitches; knit 
across plain for the 1st row, and purl across for the 
2nd row. 

Third row. — Slip 1st .stitch; * purl 2 together, 
wool over needle, purl 2 together, purl 5; out of 
the next stitch purl 2 (1 out of the front of the 
stitch in the usual manner, and 1 reversed out of 
the back); purl 3, knit 4 plain, but of these 4 slip 
the first 2 on a separate needle, which leave at the 
back; knit the last 2, then slip the first 2 back on 
the needle and knit them; purl 3, purl 2 out of the 
next stitch as before, purl 5, purl 2 together, wool 
over needle, purl 2 together, purl 2; repeat from * 
once more, ending with purl 1 instead of purl 2 as 
before. 

Fourth row. — Knit back plain. 
Fifth row. — Like 3rd row, but knit the group of 
4 in regular order instead of crossing them. 

Sixth row. — Slip 1st stitch, purl 10, knit 3, purl 4, 
knit 3, purl 22, knit 3, purl 4, knit 3, purl 11. 

Seventh row. — Slip the 1st; * knit 2 together, 
wool over, knit 2 together, knit 5 ; out of the next 
stitch knit 1 plain and 1 reversed (to reverse, insert 
the needle from the back downward); purl 3, knit 
4, purl 3; out of the next stitch knit 1 plain and 1 
reversed; knit 5, knit 2 together, wool over, knit 2 
5 



together, knit 2; repeat from * once more, ending 
with knit 1 instead of knit 2. 

Eighth ro7v. — Like the 6th row. 

Repeat these rows beginning with the 3rd row, 
until the stripe is as long as you wish the petticoat 
to be, and then knit as follows to finish the stripe 
and make the border: Knit 1 row like the 3rd; 
next, 1 row plain, and then 2 rows purled. Then, 
for the border itself, knit 1st row thus: Wool over 
needle, narrow, and repeat to end of row; 2nd row, 
purled. Next 4 rows like last 2 by turns; now 4 
rows alternate purl and plain, so that the work will 
be plain on right side, and bind off. 

When the stripes are crocheted together and the 
border is hemmed as described, the petticoat may 
be sewed to a yoke or a belt, or a crocheted cord 
may be run in the top; or a row of double or treble 
crochets may be made along the top and a ribbon 
inserted for a belt. 

Knitted Lace for a Flannel Petticoat. 

(No Illustration.) 

Use medium steel needles and knitting silk for 
this showy lace which is suitable for flannel petti- 
coats. Cast on 22 stitches, and knit across plain. 

First row. — K 3, o, n, k 1, o, n, k 2, o, k 1, o, n, 
k 1, n, o, k 2, o twice, n, o twice, n. 

Secotid row. — K 2, p 1, k 2, p 1, n, k 1, o, si 1, 
n, pass si st over, o, k 3, o, n, n, o, n, k 1, o, n, k 1. 

Third row. — K 3, o, n, k 1, o, n, o, n, k 1, n, o, 
k 1, o, k 1, n, k 6. 

Fourth row.- — -Cast off 3, k 5, o, k 3, o, si 1, n, 




No. 14. — Detail for Knitted Petticoat. 



pass si st over, o, k 3, o, n, k 1, o, n, k 1. Repeat 
from 1st row. Knitters will understand that lace 
is made more or less open according to the size of 
the needles used. 



66 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted Evening Hood. (Or, Child's Cap). Knitted Design for a Three-Cornered Shawl. 

No. 15. — Two colors of single zephyr, German 
town wool or any worsted 
preferred may be used for 
this natty article, which is 
appropriate for a young lady 
or for a child. Worn by a 
child it is called a cap, and 
donned by a young lady it 
becomes an evening hood. 
An illustration of it as a cap 
for a child may be seen at 
No. 1, first page of Children's 
Department. The decora- 
tions may be varied. 

Cast on 65 stitches and 
purl and knit, alternately, 5 
rows. Now join the other 
color, * knit 5 stitches in the 
usual manner; then knit 5 
more, putting the thread 
over for each, three times 
instead of once; then knit 5 
in the usual manner, and so 
on across the row. Now 
knit back plain, dropping the 
three put-over threads be- 
tween the stitches at this 
part of the row. Repeat 
twice more from *. Then 
join the other color, knit 1 
row plain, purl 1 row, knit 1, 
purl 1, thus making 4 rows. 
Alternate the puffed row and 
the one last made until there 
are 4 rows of puffs; then be- 
ginning to narrow, make 6 

more rows of puffs and 7 of the plain stripe, nar- 
rowing gradually at each end of the needle until 
there are about 30 stitches left on it. (If single 
zephyr is used, the 




No. 15.— Knitted Evening Hood. 



hood or cap should 
now be about 11 
inches across the 
back, 5 across the 
top, and 8 inches at 
each side.) Now 
take up the stitches 
around the face, and 
knit a strip to corre- 
spond with that at 
the beginning of the 
work. Fold the 
hood double and 
sew the top edges 
together. Finish it 
with a bow or rosette 
and ties of ribbon. 
The work should 
be done loosely in 
order to produce the 

prettiest effect. A very dainty affair of the kind may 
be made of knitting silk or of any of the fine wools. 




No. 16. —Knitted Design for a Three-Cornered Shawl. 



No. 16. — This shawl may be made of Saxony 
and double zephyr wool. 
Use bone or wooden needles. 
Cast on with the zephyr, 300 
stitches, and knit one row. 
The shawl is knitted plain 
throughout and is shaped 
by knitting 2 together at the 
end of each row. 

Second to Ninth rows. — 
Use the Saxony yarn. 

Tenth row. — Use the 
zephyr; when knitting the 
first and second stitches, 
pick up and knit the corre- 
sponding stitches of the last 
zephyr row with them; k 8, 
pick up the next 2 stitches, 
and repeat in this manner 
across the work. 

Eleventh row. — Still using 
the zephyr, knit plain. 

Now repeat from the 
second row arranging the 
diamond pattern by picking 
up the stitches between those 
picked up in the 10th row. 
(See engraving^. Repeat in 
this manner until the shawl 
is finished. Finish the up- 
per edge of the shawl with 
a crocheted shell edge of 
Saxony, and the other edges 
with a fringe of the same 
intermingled with the zephyr 
knotted in. 
This design may be very prettily worked out in 
white Ice wool with the diamonds of knitting silk 
in some dainty color, such as pale-blue, rose-color, 

lavender,Nile-green, 
etc., etc. ; or of dark- 
blue, black, red or 
orange. 

Knitted Edging 
for a Shawl. 

(No Illustration.) 

A pretty edging 
for a shawl is knit 
as follows: Cast on 
9 stitches and knit 
1 plain row. 

First row. — Slip 
1, knit 1, th o, slip 
1, knit 3, pass the 
slipped stitch over 
the three knitted 
ones, th o, knit 1, th 
o twice, knit 2. 
Second row. — Slip 1, knit 2, purl 1, knit 2, purl 
3, knit 3. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



67 



Third row. — Slip i, knit i, th o, slip i, knit 3, 
pass the slipped stitch over, knit 6. 

Fourth row. — Cast off 4, knit 2, purl 3, knit 3; 
repeat from the first 
row until a length 
is knitted sufficient 
to go around the 
article. 

Knitted Shawl. 

No. 17 . — T h i s 
shawl is made of 
white double Ger- 
mantown wool, and 
is knitted on large 
bone or wooden 
needles. A good 
way in which to 
make it is as fol- 
lows: Cut a paper 
pattern, three-cor- 
nered in shape, and 
measuring from 
point to point across 
what will be the top 
of the shawl, 55 
inches; from the top 
of the shawl down 
the center to the 
lower point, 28 
inches, and from 
this point to each 
end of the shawl, 
41 inches. Now 
cast on 135 stitches 
and knit back and 
forth in the ordinary manner, narrowing in each 
row at the ends as necessary to shape the shawl 
to the pattern until the shawl is of the size and 
shape of the pattern. 

To Finish the Top of the Shawl. — Make shells, 
each formed of 5 double crochets caught down 
with single crochets. 

For the Lower Edges: First row. — Begin at the 
point with a chain of 4 stitches and make 1 double 
crochet in about the 3rd stitch; then 1 double 
crochet back in 
the first stitch, 
drawing the 
stitches and also 
the last loop on 
the hook out 
long. Then skip 
1 rib; make a 
double crochet in 
the next stitch, 
and then another 
double back on 
the other side of 
the ridge, draw- 
ing the stitches and loop out long as before. Re- 
peat across the work so that the crossed doubles 
will lie flatly. 




No. 17. — Knitted Shawl. 




No. 18. — Knitted Bedroom Slipper 



Second rmv. — Make a chain of 3 stitches and 
then 1 double crochet in the 2nd space, and 1 
double back in the first space; 1 double in the 3rd 

space and 1 back 
in the 2nd, and 
work in this order 
across the shawl. 

Third row. — 
Same as last. 

To Make the 
Fringe. — Very loose 
chains of n stitch- 
es each, and catch 
in the top of every 
crossed double. 

The shawl may 
be made larger or 
smaller according 
to individual taste, 
and of any color 
preferred. 

Knitted Bedroom 

Slippers. 

No. 18. — Use 
Germantown yarn 
or single zephyr in 
two colors. Blue 
and gray make a 
pretty combination. 
The slipper is knit- 
ted in a straight 
strip that is long 
enough, after it is 
joined, to go around 
the sole to be used. 
In joining, the two ends are not sewed together, 
but as follows: Turn the corner of one end down 
so that the end edge will be even with the lower 
edge. This will make a bias fold which extends 
along the instep from the toe to the top of the 
slipper. Then bring the remaining end around 
and join it to the edge which now crosses the 
strip from top to bottom, beyond the bias fold, 
and join the two at this point. This will shape the 
slipper and make it ready for the sole. In sew- 
ing on the lat- 
ter, the point 
must be turned 
under and held a 
little full to shape 
it nicely. 

The design is 

in honey - comb 

pattern, with 2 

stitches to a 

square. For a 

No. 4 sole 54 

squares in length 

will be needed. 

Cast on 26 stitches with the blue, and knit across 

plain. Now to form the squares: Slip off 2 blue 

stitches, inserting the needle in each as for purling. 



68 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Now with the gray yarn, knit 2; slip 2 blue stitches 
as before, knit 2 with the gray and so on across the 
needle. In working back, slip 2 blue stitches, and 
purl 2 gray stitches alternately across the work. 

Work back and 
forth in the same 
order once more. 
Now with the 
blue, knit back 
and forth plain 
4 times; then re- 
peat the squares 
with the blue and 
gray as before. 
Continue in this 
manner until the 
strip is 54 squares 
in length. Then 
join the strip as 
before described 
to shape the slip- 
per, and sew it 
to the sole. 

Knit a border 
in loop knitting 
using both colors, 
or one, as prefer- 
red according to 
the directions for 
No. 31 on page 
17, making it as 
wide as desired, and sew it around the top of the 
slipper. Finish the slipper with a bow of ribbon. 




No. 19. — Ladies' Knitted Hug- 
Me-Tigiit, or Zouave Jacket. 



Ladies' Knitted 



Hug-me-Tight, 
Jacket. 



or Zouave 



No. 19. — This is a very simple garment to make 
and one exceedingly comfortable to wear either 
about the house, or on the street under outside 
wraps. It is made of Germantown wool, and 
any color preferred may be selected; but black, 
brown, dark blue, red and gray are the colors gen- 
erally chosen. It is knitted in a long strip on 
coarse steel needles, in plain back and forth 
rows. The one illustrated was knitted on a 
foundation of 50 stitches and the strip was 204 
ribs long when completed. A general rule which 
will adapt the size of the garment to the figure 
of the person who is to wear it is as follows: 
Make the strip as wide as the figure measures 
from the center of the chest to the arm-socket, 
and twice as long as the chest measures from 
one arm-socket to the other. For instance, if 
the chest measure from arm to arm is 16 inches, 
make the strip 8 inches wide and 32 inches 
long. 

When the strip is completed, firmly join its two 
ends by an over-and-over stitch with a coarse 
needle and the knitting yarn. Now find the cen- 
ter of the strip and fold the latter so that the seam 
will be even with and over the center. Next, sew 
the edges at one side of the strip together across 



the middle, leaving an unsewed portion at each 
side large enough for an arm-hole. This seam will 
extend from shoulder to shoulder when the gar- 
ment is on, while the seam of the ends will come 
at the middle of the back below this cross-seam. 
Finish the edges with a shell border in crochet, 
using the same or a contrasting color as preferred. 
Put the garment on, draw it together over the bust 
and sew ties of ribbon at the necessary point to 
close it. This jacket could be made in fancy 
ribbed knitting if desired; but as described it ad- 
justs itself very easily and snugly to the figure. 



Ladies' Zouave Jacket, or Hug-me-Tight, 
Knitted by a Diagram. 

No. 20. — A garment of the description named 
and presenting the same appearance as the one 
illustrated at figure No. 19 except that its seams 
will be under the arms instead of across the back, 
may be knitted according to the directions given 
with this diagram. Plain or fancy knitting as pre- 
ferred, may be used for the garment. 

The narrow sections extend from each side of 
the back, down the front and under the arm where 
their ends are joined to the back as indicated by 
the crosses. To begin properly, cut a pattern of 
the required size and shaped like the diagram. It 
will be observed that the long narrow (front) sec- 
tions are a little more than one-third the width of 
the other (back) section, and this proportion must 
be maintained in making any size. Then cast on 
the stitches for one narrow section of the pattern 
and knit back and forth until the wide section is 
reached. Then cast on enough more stitches to 
reach the full depth of this section and continue 
knitting until the other narrow section is reached. 
Bind off the extra stitches cast on, thus reducing 
the work to the width of the narrow section again; 
knit until this is long enough, bind off and join the 
ends to the back as before suggested, as indicated 
by the crosses. Then crochet a pretty shell-bor- 
der about the edges, fulling in the edges of the 
arm-hole in front, if necessary, to make it fit in 



X 








X 


K 


X 
X 




X 
X 


X 



No. 20. —Diagram for Zouave Jacket, or Hug-me-Tight. 



to the figure. The edge of this jacket, when 
the latter is adjusted, will roll prettily to the 
closing, after the manner of a round lapel, such as. 
is seen on cloth jackets closing only over the bust. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



69 



Knitted Three-Cornered Shawl with Detail. 

Nos. 21 and 22. — This shawl is made of eider- 
down wool, and is knitted with 3 thick bone or 
wooden needles. In order to 
widen it at the point in a neat 
manner, a chain of 130 loops 
is crocheted and fastened in 
at the first row, as will be de- 
scribed later on. In knitting 
back and forth 2 loops of the 
chain are taken up in each 
row. 

Begin the shawl as follows: 

Cast on 2 stitches, and knit 
back. Now, with the second 
needle, pick up 2 stitches of 
the crocheted chain, so that 
the latter will be next to the 
point of the needle; then with 
the first needle, knit them off 
in regular order. This will 
leave the chain at the middle 
of the work. 

Next, with the second nee- 
dle, knit off 2 stitches, and 
knit 1 loop of the chain; 
now with a third needle, knit 
another loop of the chain and 
the two remaining on the first 

needle. This widens 1 stitch on each of the 
foundation needles. This widening is done on 
the same plan throughout the work, and the pat- 
tern is made by knitting 2 rows and purling 2 al- 
ternately. 

At the beginning of each row also widen as fol- 




No. 21. — Knitted Three-Corxered Shawl, 



with a crocheted border made as follows: 

First row. — Single crochets separated by 7 
chains. 

Second row. — Two double crochets separated by 
a 5-chain around every 7- 
chain. 

Third rmu. — One double 
crochet, 2 trebles, 3 chain, 2 
trebles and 1 double around 
every 5-chain. Any other bor- 
der preferred may be made, 
either in knitting or crochet. 



Knitted Petticoat. 

(No Illustration.) 

Germantown wool makes a 
good warm petticoat for the 
cold days of winter. Cast on 
any number of stitches divi- 
sible by ten. 

First row. — K 9 and p 1. 

Second row. — K 2 and p 8. 

Third row. — K 7 and p 

3- 

Fourth row. — K 4 and p 
6. 

Fifth row.- — K 5 and p 5 
Sixth row. — K 6 and p 4. 

Seventh row. — K 3 and p 7. 

Eighth row. — K 8 and p 2. 

Ninth row. — K 1 and p 9. 

Tenth row. — Knit all plain. 

Ten rows complete the pattern; repeat. The 
skirt should be knitted in stripes and joined; 80 or 




No. 22. — Detail for Three-Cornered Shawl. 



lows: K 1 and p 1 out of the second stitch. 

Knit the shawl as large as desired and finish 



100 stitches will be found 
upon. 



a good number to work 



70 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




■■■'-■■"^mus^- 







**%gW 



Ladies' Mittens. 

No. 23. — Use No. 19 needles and knitting silk. 
Cast onto each of 2 needles, 24 stitches, and onto a 

third, 32 stitches. Knit 
5 rounds plain. 

Sixth round. — N, th 
o, and repeat around 
the work. Knit 7 
rounds plain. 

Fourteenth round. — 
K 1, th o, k 2, si 1, k 
2 together, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 2, th o 
and repeat. 

Fifteenth round. — 
Plain. 

Repeat the last 2 
rounds, 3 times more, 
but after each plain 
round, pass the first 
stitch of each needle 
onto the next needle, 
knitting the first one 
slipped only as the last 
stitch of the plain 
round. Now knit 5 
rounds plain. 

Then, knit 27th to 
50th, inclusive, like 
14th and 15th, slipping 
the stitches in the 
plain rounds, the same 
as before directed. 

Fifty-first round.- 1 — 
Plain. 

This completes the 
wrist portion up to 
where the fancy stripe for the hand begins. To 
make this stripe come in the right place, the follow- 
ing plan must be adopted: Knit plain across the 
rirst needle containing 24 stitches; knit 19 on the 
next or second needle, and pass 5 stitches from this 
needle onto the third needle; then pass 5 from the 
third needle onto the first, and divide the stitches 
on the first and second needles so that each will 
contain 24 stitches. The fancy stripe requires 29 
stitches, and is in 12 divisions, each consisting of 8 
rounds. 

First round. — SI and b, k 6, th o, k 2, th o, k 3, 
si 1, k 2 together, pass slipped stitch over, k 3, th o, 
k 2, th o, k 6, n. Knit rest plain. 

Second round. — SI and b, k 5, th o, k 15, th o, k5, 
n. Knit rest plain.. 4p 

Third rou?id. — SI and b, k 4, th o, k 4, th o, k 3, 
si 1, k 2 together, pass slipped stitch over, k3, th o, 
k 4, th o, k 4, n. Knit rest plain. 

Fourth round. — SI and b, k 3, th o, k 19, th 0, 
k 3, n. Knit rest plain. 

Fifth round. — SI and b, k 2, th o, k 6, th o, k 3, 
si 1, k 2 together, pass slipped stitch over, k 3, th o, 
k 6, th o, k 2, n. Knit rest plain. 

Sixth round. — SI and b, k 1, th o, k 23, th o, k 1, 
m Knit rest plain. 



■Nni 

mm 



No. 23.— Ladies' Mitten. 



of the hand, leaving 
across the fancy por- 



Seventh round. — SI and b, th o, k 8, th o, k 3, 
si 1, k 2 together, pass slipped stitch over, k3, th o, 
k 8, th o, n. 

Eighth round. — Plain. This completes one di- 
vision. After repeating these 8 rounds 12 times, 
the fancy tip of the stripe is knit in 6 rounds as 
follows: 

First round. — K 8, n, th o, k 1, th o, k 2, si 1, 
k 2 together, pass slipped stitch over, k 2, th o, k 1, 
th o, si and b, k 8. Knit rest plain. 

Second Fourth a?id Sixth rounds. — Plain. 

Third round. — K 12, th o, k 1, si 1, k 2 together, 
pass slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 12. Knit rest 
plain. 

Fifth round. — K 13, th o, si 1, k 2 together, pass 
slipped stitch over, th o, k 13. Knit rest plain. 

The plain portions of the mitten are knit upon 
the same plan as that given in the general rule for 
knitting mittens, on page 51. The thumb of this 
mitten begins in the 76th round. 

A lining is knitted for the back and wrist of this 
mitten as follows: 

Pick up on 3 needles the 80 stitches along the 
top edge and knit plain until you have a piece 
which is deep enough, together with the first 5 
rows of the mitten which are turned down inside 
for a hem, to reach to the lower edge of the 
fancy portion of the wrist. Then cast off loosely 
around the plain portion 
enough stitches to reach 

tion extending down the back. On these knit 
back and forth until the strip is long enough to ex- 
tend under the fancy knitting. Fasten so that it 
will not interfere with the elasticity of the mitten. 

Knitted Bed Socks. 

No. 24. — Use Germantown wool, two colors. 
Cast on 98 stitches, 
and knit plain for 
13 rows. Then k 
46 st, n, k 2, n, and 
knit the remaining 
46 st plain. For 
the next row, k 45, 
n, k 2, n, k 45. 
Now continue to 
narrow in every row 
at each side of the 
center as above di- 
rected until there 
are 60 stitches on 
the needle, or 28 
stitches before the 
1st narrowing and 
also after the 2nd; 
Then narrow every 
other time until 
there are 50 stitches 
on the needle or 23 
at each side of the narrowings. Now k 2 and p 2 
alternately until the length desired is obtained ; bind 
off and crochet a scollop on the edge. Then sew 
the sock together down the back and along the sole. 




No. 24. — Knitted Bed Sock. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



71 



Ladies' Knitted Leggings. 

No. 25. — These are warm coverings for the feet 
and legs, and will be found very useful for ladies 
who reside in the country and who have to drive 
some distance to dances or dinner parties, or for 
daytime drives in cold weather. They may be 
made of white wool if intended to be worn over 
white or light silk stockings, or of dark colors or 
black when for wear over dark stockings. Use 
Germantown yarn and four No. 10 needles in 
knitting them. 

Begin at the top of the leg, cast 62 stitches on 
one needle. (This will make a legging of small size, 
which may be made larger by casting on more 
stitches when commencing the work). 

First to Thirty-fourth rows. — Knit 2 and purl 2 
alternately. 

Thirty-fifth to Sixtieth rows. — Knit plain. 
Sixty-first to One Hundredth rows. — Knit 2 to- 
gether at the beginning and end of each alternate 
row, until 22 stitches only remain. 

Now cast 23 stitches on a third needle, and work 
on these 23, and across the 22; cast on 23 more 

stitches; thus you will 
have 23 stitches each 
side the 22 which form 
the center of the knee. 
Knit 24 rows on all 
stitches, then 24 rows 
of knit 2 and purl 2 al- 
ternately; then knit 34 
plain rows. 

In the next round 
the decrease for the 
calf is commenced. 
Knit 2, knit 2 together, 
knit 60, knit 2 together, 
knit 2; knit 5 rows 
without decrease, then 
work a row decreasing 
after the first two and 
before the last 2 
stitches; continue to 
decrease with 5 plain 
rows between, until 
you have decreased 9 
times; then work 32 
rows plain. 

Now divide the 
stitches on 3 needles, 
16 on each side and 18 
in the center; knit 
across the first 16 
stitches; knit 1 out of 
the back and 1 out of 
the front of the first of 
18 stitches; knit 16; 
knit 1 out of the front 
and 1 out of the back of 
the next stitch; knit 
the 16 on the other needle; turn, and knit back; in- 
crease in the same way twice more, with the plain 
row between. 



Now work only on the 24 stitches on the center 
needle; work 12 rows on these, then work a row, 
decreasing by knitting 2 together at the beginning 
and end of the row; knit 12 rows; then work a row, 
decreasing by knitting 2 together at the beginning 
and end of this row; knit 12 rows. 

Now pick up 1 stitch at the end of each ridge 





No. 25 — .Ladies Knitted 
Legging. 



No 26 — Knitted Petticoat. 

down each side of front; then work 6 rows on all 
the stitches, and cast off. 

Sew the legging together up the back of the leg, 
and sew the cast -on stitches at the under part of 
the knee to the edge of the decreased rows; this 
will form a kind of gusset. 

Knitted Petticoat. 

No. 26. — In knitting this garment Germantown 
wool and 2 No. 10 wooden needles are used. The 
petticoat is made in 2 separate widths each 36 inches 
long, and 42 wide at the bottom. For each of these 
widths cast on 273 stitches. Knit back and forth, 
plain, for 4 rows. Then for the first pattern row, 
knit as follows: Knit 1, * k 2 together, make 1, k 1, 
make 1, k 1, k 2 together, k 1. Repeat from * to 
the end of the row. 

Second, Fourth, Sixth, Eighth and Ninth rows. — 
Purl. 

Third, Seventh and Tenth rows. — Plain. 

Fifth row. — Same as 1st pattern row. Repeat 
3 times more from 1st *. There will then be 40 
rows. 

Forty-first row. — Knit plain. In this and all 
following rows, decrease 1 stitch at the beginning 
to form the slope. 

Forty-second row. — Purl. 

Forty-third and Forty-fourth rows. — Purl 2, knit 1. 
Repeat from the 41st row until you have the re- 
quired length. 

Owing to the decrease, the number to be knitted 
or purled, as the case may be, at the beginning of 
each row must necessarily be irregular; but care 
must be taken that the one stitch forming the per- 
pendicular rib is kept in a straight line. 



72 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted Chenille Hood. 



Nos. 27 and 28 — This hood 
wired chenille on thick wooden 




No. 27. — Knitted Chenille Hood. 



is knitted from 
needles, and is 
made in trian- 
gular shape. It 
is 55,^2 inches 
long at the 
longest (front) 
edge, i2JHi in- 
ches across the 
middle and 
3 y^ inches 
wide at each 
end. 

It is begun 
at one end on 
a foundation 
of 6 stitches 
and knitted 
back and forth 
very loosely. 
(See No. 28). 
From the 6th 
to the 30th 
rows, increase 
1 stitch at the 
end of every 
row as you 
work back, 
thus increas- 
i n g b y 1 3 
stitches. Knit to the 36th row in which widen 1 
stitch. Knit to the 42nd row, and from this row 
to the 52nd row inclusive, widen by 1 on each row 
as before. This will make 20 stitches that have 
been added since the first row. 

After 2 rows more without increase, the middle 
of the hood is reached. Knit the other half to cor- 
respond with the first, narrowing instead of widen- 
ing. The fringe is of chenille in loops 3^ inches 
long. It is crocheted in the manner described for 
the cape seen on page 74. It may be made as heavy 
as desired by adding more or less loops to the 
stitches. 

Ladies' Knitted Vest. (Basket Pattern.) 

(For Illustration see Page 7-3.) 

No. 29. — This vest is made with Belding's knit- 
ting silk and No. 17 steel needles. 

Cast on in stitches for the lower edge of the 
front portion to begin the border, and knit back 
and forth, always slipping the first stitch of every 
row. 

First, Third and Seventh rows. — Knit plain. 

Second, Fifth and Eighth rows. — Purl. 

Fourth and Sixth rows. — SI 1, * m 1, k 3, si 1, 
k 1, pass slipped stitch over, k 2 together, k 3, m 1, 
k 1 and repeat from * to end of row. 

Ninth row. — Plain. 

Repeat from fourth to ninth row inclusive. 

Sixteenth row. — K 2 together, k 1, k 2 together, 
* k 2 together, k 9, and repeat from * till within 7 
stitches of the end of the row; k 2 together, k 2, 



k 2 together, k 1. This completes the border and 
leaves 98 stitches on the needle. 

Work for the basket pattern as follows: 

First and Third rcnus. — K 5, p 3, * k 7, p 3 and 
repeat from * to the end of the row. 

Second row. — K 3, p 7 and repeat, ending with 
purl 5. 

Fourth row. — Plain. 

Fifth and Seventh rows. — P 3, k 7, and repeat 
ending with purl 5. 

Sixth row. — P 5, k 3, * p 7, k 3 and repeat from 
* to the end. 

Eighth row. — Plain. 

Repeat these 8 rows until there are 18 blocks or 
144 rows of knitting. If desired longer, knit until 
there are 21 blocks. 

For the Shoulders: First row. — K 5, p 3, k 7, p 3, 
k 7, p 3, k 1, pass the next to the last stitch over 
the last one, and continue to cast off in this manner 
until 26 stitches remain on the left-hand needle. 
Then k 3, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 7, p 3. 

Second row.— K 3, p 7, k 3, p 7, k 3, p 2, p 2 
together. 

Third row.—K 3, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 7, p 3. 

Fourth row. — K 24, k 2 together. 

Fifth roru.—K 7, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 5. 

Sixth row.—? 5, k 3, p 7, k 3, p 5, p 2 togther. 

Seventh row. — K 6, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 5. 

Eighth roiu. — K 22, k 2 together. 

Ninth row.—? 3, k 7, p 3, k 7, p 3. 

Tenth row. — K 3, p 7, k 3, p 7, k 1, k 2 together. 

Eleventh row. — P 2, k 7, p 3, k 7, p 3. 

Twelfth row. — K 20, k 2 together. 

Thirteenth row. — K 3, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 5, 




No. 28. — Detail for Knitted Chenille Hood. 

Fourteenth row. — P 5, k 3, p 7, k 3, pi, p 2 
together. 

Fifteenth row. — K 2, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 5. 
Sixteenth row. — K 20. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



73 



Seventeenth row. — K 7, p 3, k 7, p 3. 
Eighteenth row. — K 3, p 7, k 3, p 7. 
Nineteenth row. — K 7, p 3, k 7, p 3. 
Twentieth row. — Plain and cast off. 




2. 
3, 



P 7, k 3. 



7, k 3 , ps. 



No. 29. — Ladies' Knitted Vest. (Basket Pattern). 
(For Directions see Page 72.) 

Now work upon the other shoulder beginning at 
the neck edge. The first row is already knit. 

Second row. — K 2 together, p 7, k 3, p 7, k 3, p 5. 

Third row.—K 5, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 7, p 1. 

Fourth row. — K 2 together, k 24. 

j*t/7/z m^.— F 3, k 7, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 

Sixth row. — P 2 together, k 3, p 7, k 

Seventh row. — P 3, k 7, p 3, k 7, p 4. 

Eighth row. — K 2 together, k 22. 

Ninth row.—K. 5, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 5. 

Tenth row. — K 2 together, p 3, k 3, p 

Eleventh row. — K 5, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 4 

Twelfth row. — K 2 together, k 20. 

Thirteenth roiv. — P 3, k 7, p 3, k 8. 

Fourteenth row. — P 2 together, p 6, k 3, p 7, k 3. 

Fifteenth row. — P 3, k 7, p 3, k 7. 

Sixteenth row. — K 20. 

Seventeenth row. — K S, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 2. 

Eighteenth row. — P 2, k 3, p 7, k 3, p 5. 

Nineteenth row. — K 5, p 3, k 7, p 3, k 2. 

Twentieth row. — Knit plain and cast off. 

Knit the back of vest the same as the front. 
Join the two at the shoulder edges; also under the 
arms, leaving a space at the top for the arm-holes. 

For the Sleeves. — -Cast on 69 stitches for each, 
and work 15 rows like the border, making 1 addi- 
tional plain stitch at the beginning and end of 
each row. 

Sixteenth row. — Plain, narrowing once in the 
row, so as to leavj 68 stitches on the needle. 



Then knit 8 rows of basket pattern and cast off 
loosely. 

Make a gusset in the sleeve by casting on 16 
stitches and knitting 26 plain rows. Cast off. Sew 
up the sleeve and join it to the body, taking care 
that the gusset comes under the arm. 

Crochet a tiny scollop-edge about the neck, 
making a row of holes for a ribbon with double 
crochets. 

This vest may be knitted of Saxony yarn, if 
preferred. 

Ladies' Knitted Leggings. 

No. 30. — These leggings are knitted with fine, 
black, woollen stocking yarn and steel needles. 
Begin at the top, casting on 104 stitches, and knit 
in rounds. 

First round. — Work in plain knitting throughout. 
Second round. — This forms a row of holes through 
which an elastic braid is run when the article is 
completed. To make the holes, knit as follows: 
Th o and knit 2 together, 5 alternately, around the 
work. In the third round the put-over represents 
a stitch. 

From the 3rd to the 138th rounds, work in rib- 
bed knitting, 2 stitches plain and 2 purled alter- 
nately, in each round. 

The bend in the knee is worked between the 
61st and 91st rounds. In the 6isi round knit only 
65 stitches, leaving the last 39. In the 62nd round 
work only 26 stitches which leaves 39 at the other 
end. After this round, in every successive round 
including the 90th, add 1 stitch 
of those left in the 61st and 
62nd rounds; at the 91st round 
add all those which still remain. 
From the 139th to the 152nd 
rounds, the first three rounds 
are in plain knitting throughout. 
Next purl 3 rounds and knit 
3 rounds. In the 148th round, 
knit 1 and purl 3 alternately. 

In the 149th to the 151st 
rounds, purl 1 and knit 3 alter- 
nately. 

In the 152nd round, knit 1 and 
purl 3 alternately. 

Repeat the last 14 rounds 10 
times more; and once more re- 
peat from the 139th to the 
147th round; but in the last two 
repetitions of the 10, at intervals 
of an equal number of ronnds, 
narrow 4 times in each pattern 
— making 1 narrowing at the 
beginning of the round and one 
at the end. 

The next 58 rounds are in the 
ribbed knitting — 2 plain, 2 purl- 
ed — and these are followed by 
10 rounds for the bottom, made as follows: 

First round. — * Knit 1, th o, k 1, pi, th o, p 1, 
and repeat from * across the row. 

Second and Third rounds. — K 3 and p 3 alternately. 




No. 30. — Ladies' 
Knitted Legging. 



74 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Fourth round. — Knit i, th o, k i, th o, k i, p i, 
th o, p i, th o, p i, and repeat for all the rounds. 

Fifth and Sixth rounds. — Knit 5 and purl 5 al- 
ternately. 

Seventh round. — Knit 2, th o, k 1, tho, k 2, p 2, th 

o, p 1, th o, p 
2, and repeat 
around the 
work. 

Eight, Ninth 
flnd Tenth 
rounds. — Knit 
7 and purl 7 al- 
ternately. Bind 
off and fasten 
the thread se- 
curely. 

Knitted 

Chenille 

Cape. 




NO. 31. — KNITTED CUSNILLE CAPE. 



No. 31. — 
This cape is 
made of black 
feather-chenille and is knitted very loosely on 
large wooden needles — an inch and a-quarter in 
circumference. The edge is finished with loops 
of the chenille crocheted in according to directions 
given below. 

Begin the cape at the lower edge, casting on 64 
stitches. It is 40 rows deep. 
Knit plain for 26 rows. 



Twenty-seventh row. — Knit 15; * th o, k 1 
repeat from * six times more; knit 20, * th o. 



and 
k 1 



and repeat six times more from last *; knit 15. 

Twenty-eighth row. — Knit plain, but knit each 
put-over in the preceding row through the back 
part of the stitch. 

Twe>ity-ninth rmv. — K 15, k 2 together 7 times, 
k 20, k 2 together 7 times, k 15. 

Thirtieth row. — Knit 16, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 
together, k 22, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together, k 16. 

Thirty-first row. — K 15, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 
together, k 20, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together, k 15. 

Thirty-second row. — K 14, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 
together, k 18, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together, k 14. 

Thirtv-third rmu. — K 13, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 
together, k 16, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together, k 13. 

Thirty-fourth row. — K 12, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 
together, k 14, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together k 12. 
. Thirty-fifth to Fortieth rows. — Knit plain through- 
out, but at the beginning of each row cast off 4 
stitches. At the end of the 40th row, cast off the 
remaining stitches. 

Finish the neck, first with a row of single cro- 
chets and then with a row of picots as follows: * 1 
single, a picot made with 3-chain and 1 single in 
first stitch of chain; skip 1 stitch and repeat from 
*. Draw the thread through at the end of the row 
and secure it. Then make the fringe down the 
front as follows: 

Bring the thread to the next stitch of the edge, 
make a loop through it, pull a loop through this 
loop, drawing it out to a length of 2] 



Secure the first loop by drawing it tight. Remove 
the hook; take up another loop through the next 
stitch, draw a long loop as before through it, 
tighten, and repeat along the entire edge, making 
several loops through the corner stitches at the 
bottom of the cape; and along the lower edge 
make 2 loops in every stitch and draw each out 3 
inches long instead of 2^2 inches. 



Knitted Knee Caps. 



No. 



32. — Use Berlin or Germantown wool or 
single zephyr. Cast 114 stitches onto 4 needles 
and work with a 5th as follows: 

Knit in rib style for 47 rounds. The ribs are 
formed by purling 2 and knitting 2 alternately. 

In the 48th round begin the gore which covers 
the knee by knitting off the first 26 stiches and 
knitting them ' separately back and forth, alter- 
nately purling and knitting 2 stitches. After knit- 
ting 2 rows in this manner, change the pattern by 
knitting the stitches that were purled and purling 
those that were knitted, thus forming small squares. 

In knitting this gore, a stitch is taken from the 
needles at each side of the 26 stitches every time 
across after the 1st row, (this widens the gore) and 
the gore is knitted as above described and stitches 
taken from the needles, until there are only 42 
stitches left of the original ribbed portion. This 




No. 32. — Knitted Knee Cap. 

brings the gore to the points at the side and com- 
pletes the upper half of it. 

Now work the lower half of the gore separately 
narrowing once at the end of every row until only 
26 stitches are left. Now take up 23 stitches at 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



75 



each side of these 26 stitches, along the selvedges 
of the gore, the same as you pick up the stitches 
for the heel of a stocking. This will bring you to 
the side points of the gore. Divide the stitches as 
evenly as possible on the four needles and then 
work in rib style, the same as at the top, 47 more 
rounds, being careful to have the ribs continuous 
with those of the upper portion of the article. 

Finish the edges with a crocheted border worked 
as follows: 1 single crochet in every rib with 1 
chain between. Next row, 4 double crochets under 
the chains, catching them down so as to lie flatly. 
Two colors may be used if desired. 

Knitted Skirt. 

No. 33. — Use Berlin wool or three-thread Sax- 
ony yarn in two colors, with one pair of bone 
needles No. 9, and one pair No. 11. The skirt is 
very quickly and easily made. It is composed of 
12 stripes, each knitted separately. 

Begin at the lower edge and cast onto one of the 
No. 9 needles 41 stitches. 

First row. — Make 1, knit 19, slip 1, knit 2 to- 
gether, pass slipped stitch over the two just knit- 
ted, knit 19. 

Second row. — Make 1; knit to end of row. 
Repeat these two rows throughout the work. 
The 3rd, 4th, 7th, 8th, nth and 12th- rows are 
knitted with one color and all the rest with the 
remaining colors. 

To decrease the size of the petticoat toward the 

waist, knit with No. 
11 needles after 
two-thirds of the 
length has been 
worked. The 
length of the petti- 
coat must be regu- 
lated according to 
the size required. 
When all the stripes 
are worked, they 
are joined together 
on the right side 
with single stitches 
worked in crochet. 
For the crochet 
edge, work with 
blue wool 1 double 
into the edge of 
knitting, 4 chain, 1 
treble into first of 
4 chain, 1 double 
into petticoat. Re- 
peat all round. 

The top of the 
petticoat is sewn to 
a deep yoke of white linen. A knitted lace ruffle 
may be placed under the lower edge. 

Ladies' Plain Mittens with Fancy Tops. 
No. .34. — Use 4 No. 19 needles and ordinary 




No. 33. — Knitted Skirt. 



knitting silk. Onto each of 2 needles cast 25 
stitches, and onto the third, cast 30. Knit 5 
rounds plain for a hem at the top. 

Sixth round. — N, th o and repeat around the 
work. Knit 9 rounds plain. 

Sixteenth round. — N, th o and repeat. Knit 2 
rounds plain. 

Nineteenth round. 
— K 1, th o, k 3, si 
1, n, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 3, th 
o, and repeat. 

Twentieth round. 
—Plain. 

Now pass the first 
stitch on the first 
needle onto the nee- 
dle back of it, and 
knit as the last stitch 
in the plain round. 
Twenty -fir i, t round. 
— K 2, th o,k 2, si 1, 
n, pass slipped stitch 
over, k 2, th o, k 1, 
and repeat. 

Twenty -second, 

Twenty- f ourth, 
Twenty -s ixth and 
Tw enty -seven th 
rounds. — Plain. 

Tw enty -third 
round. — Have 27 
stitches on the 1st 
needle, and 24 on 
the 2nd. Then k 3, 
th o, k 1, si 1, n, 
pass slipped stitch 
over, k 1, th o, k 2 
and repeat. 

Tw e 11 ty -fift h 
round. — Have 26 

stitches on the first needle, slipping the added stitch 
from the second needle, not from the third. Then 
k 4, th o, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch over, k 3 
and repeat. 

Twenty-eighth round. — N, th o and repeat. Knit 
6 rounds plain. 

Thirty-fifth round. — K 1, th o, k 2, si 1, n, pass 
slipped stitch over, k 2, th o and repeat. 

Thirty-sixth, Thirty -eighth, Fortieth and Forty- 
first rounds.— Plain. After knitting the 36th round, 
slip the first stitch on the first needle onto the 
next one, and knit as the last stitch in the plain 
round. 

Thirty-seventh round. — K 2, th o, k 1, si 1, n, 
pass slipped stitch over, k.i, th o, k 1, and repeat. 

Thirty-ninth round. — K 3, th o, si 1, n, pass slip- 
ped stitch over, th o, k 2. 

Repeat the last 7 rounds 5 times more thus com- 
pleting the wrist. 

Now knit plain for 8 rounds. Then begin the 
thumb and complete the mitten according to the 
instructions found in the general rule for knit- 
ting mittens, on puge 51. 




No. 34. — Ladies' Plain Mitten 
with Fancy Top. 



76 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




No. 35. — Ladies' Knitted Petticoat. 



Ladies' Knitted- Petticoat. 

No. 35. — Brown double zephyr is used for mak- 
ing a petticoat like the one illustrated. It is 
formed of as many lengthwise stripes as are re- 
quired to make it 
as wide as de- 
sired, and these 
are crocheted to- 
gether. A band 
of similar knit- 
ting is then add- 
ed to the bottom 
of the skirt, and 
a knitted border 
is added to the 
lower edge of the 
band. 

To make each 
breadth, work as 
follows : 

Cast on 28 
stitches and knit 
plain, back and 
forth 4 times. 
This makes the 
plain stripe. The 
7th time across 
begins the fancy 
stripe which is 
made as follows: Slip 1, * th 0, slip 1 inserting the 
needle as in purling, knit the next stitch and repeat 
from * also knitting the last stitch. 

Next row. — Slip 1, *, th o, slip next stitch 
(which was knitted in the last row), inserting the 
needle as for purling; knit the next stitch (which 
was slipped in the last row) and the put-over 
thread together, and repeat from * across the row, 
knitting the last stitch. Repeat this row 12 times 
more. Now, to bring the number of stitches down 
to the original 28: Knit 2, * narrow, k 1, and re- 
peat from * across the row. This really forms the 
1st row of the 2nd plain stripe, Knit 3 more plain 
rows to finish the stripe. 

Repeat these two stripes until the breadth is long 
enough to extend from the belt to the knees, knit- 
ting the fancy stripe at the top about 5 inches 
deep, narrowing it slightly as it approaches the 
upper edge, making the narrowings 2 stitches in 
from each edge. 

In knitting the breadth to be used as the left- 
side back-breadth, when within about a-quarter of 
a yard from the top (see engraving), add 10 more 
stitches to the work for the foundation for a fly or 
under-lap and knit them plain each time across. 
The back-breadths may be made wider than those 
at each side, by casting on more stitches for each 
at the beginning of the breadth; 32 may be used. 

When all the stripes or breadths are joined by 
single crochets, add the band, which is knitted 
exactly like a plain stripe, but on a foundation of 
24 stitches and long enough to reach around the 
petticoat. 

Now make the border which is knitted as follows: 



Cast on 18 stitches and knit and purl alternate 
rows until there are 4 rows, knitting the first and 
purling the last one, and narrowing at the end of 
the row. This makes one rib of the border. 

Now begin the next row, purling a stitch and 
knitting a stitch out of the first stitch ; purl the rest of 
the row. Then knit, purl and knit the next 3 rows. 

This finishes the 2nd rib of the border. Repeat 
these two ribs until the border is long enough to 
extend around the skirt; join the ends and sew or 
crochet it to the lower edge of the band. 

Make a band about the waist with single cro- 
chets, and close the skirt with button-holes left in 
the crochet-work, and buttons. 

Ladies' Jersey Undervest. 

No. 36. — Use Belding's knitting silk and No. 15 
steel needles. 

Cast on 108 stitches and knit across plain. 
First rmv. — SI 1, k 2, * th o, n, and repeat from 

* 7 times; th o, k remainder plain. 

Second row. — Purl to th o in preceding row; k 
rest plain. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 2. * th o, n, and repeat from 

* 6 times; th o, k rest plain. 
Fourth roiv. — Plain. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 2, * th o, n ; repeat from * 
5 times, th o twice; purl remainder. 
Sixth row. — Plain. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 2, * th o, n, repeat from * 
4 times; th o, k rest plain. 

Eighth row. — Purl to th o; k rest plain. 
Ninth row. — SI 1, k 2, * th o, n, repeat from * 3 

times; th o, k rest plain. 
Tenth row. — Plain. 
Eleventh rmu. — K 15 
plain; purl remainder. 
Twelfth row. — Plain. 
Thirteenth row. — 
Bind off 5, k 2, * th o, 
n, repeat from * 7 
times ; th o, k rest 
plain. Repeat from se- 
cond row until there are 
9 points and 37 ribs; 
then bind off. This 
forms one-half of the 
body. Knit the other 
half to correspond. 

Cast on 38 stitches, 
pick up stitches along 
the top of one side of 
the body, cast on 38 
more, and pick up the 
stitches across the top 
of the other side of the 
body, all on one nee- 
dle. Knit 3 rows plain, 
th o, n, k 2 and repeat 




No. 36. — Ladies' Jersey 
Undervest. 



Fourth row. — SI 1, k 1, 
from * across the work. 

Knit 4 more rows, plain, and bind off. This 
forms the band and shoulder straps. 

For the Sleeve. — Pick up 22 stitches at each side 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



77 



cf the body next to the shoulder strap, and 38 
along the shoulder strap. Purl 1st row, narrowing 
at the beginning and end, and repeat until there are 
52 stitches left and 5 ribs formed. (A rib consists 
of 3 rows). Knit 1 rib without narrowing, and 
bind off. 

Make a similar sleeve at 
the other side, and then 
close the sides in under-arm 
seams. 

Finish the band and 
sleeves with a border of 
small crocheted scollops. 

Knitted Leggings. 

No. 37. — Use Nos. 13 and 
14 needles and German- 
town yarn in making these 
gaiters. 

Cast 20 stitches on each 
of two needles and 23 on 
the third; the odd stitch is 
for the seam; this is purled 
at the end of last needle in 
one round and knitted in 
the other ; as this stitch is 
worked the same 
throughout, we 
shall not men- 
tion it in the 
following direc- 
tions. 

For the rib- 
bed top knit 2 
and purl 2, for 
2^2 inches. 

Now purl 2 
rounds and knit 
1 round; then 
commence the 
pattern for the leg as follows: 

First round. — Knit 1, * purl 4, knit 1, purl 1, knit 
1; repeat from * all round and end with knit 1 
before the seam stitch. 

Second round. — Knit 1, purl 5, * knit 1, purl 6; 
repeat from * all round and end with knit 1 before 
the seam. 

Third round. — Knit 1, * purl 1, knit 2, purl 1, 
knit 1, purl 1, knit 1; repeat from * and end with 
knit 1. 

Fourth round. — Knit 1, * purl 1, knit 2, purl 2, 
knit 1, purl 1; repeat from * all round; knit the last 
stitch before the seam. Repeat from the first round 
for 4^4 inches. 

Now continue the pattern, but decrease for the 
ankle by knitting the 2nd and 3rd stitches of the 
first needle together, and the last two stitches but 
one of the last needle together, that is, decreas- 
ing on each side of the seam stitch in every 
third round, until you have only 50 stitches left, 
then purl 1 round and knit 1 round; now take the 
No. 13 needles and knit 1 and purl 1 alternately 
all round for 2 inches. Now on the 21 stitches at 




No. 37. — Knitted Legging. 






Wmm® 



the back of the leg, that is 10 on each side of the 
seam, work with 2 needles like the heel of a stock- 
ing, knit 1; and purl 1 alternately for 1^ inch; 
put the stitches on a piece of cotton, and tie it to 
prevent their falling off; pick up 12 stitches at the 
right side of the heel, knit across the front of foot, 
still preserving the rib; pick up 12 stitches on the 
other side of heel; continue to work on the side of 
heel and front stitches backwards and forwards; 
the side of heel stitches are knitted plain, and the 
front of foot stitches ribbed; decrease in every 3rd 
row by knitting the last 2 of side of heel stitches 
together on the right side of front, and the first 2 
on the left side until all the side stitches are taken 
in, then work on the front stitches for about an 
inch. Now pick up the stitches down the side of 
front, take the stitches off the cotton on to a needle 
and pick up the stitches on the other side of front; 
purl 4 rounds, then cast off; sew a strap of webbing 
about 2 inches long to the stitches next the heel. 

Ladies' Knitted Mittens. 

No. 38. — Cast onto each of 2 No. 19 needles, 25 
stitches, and onto a 
3rd, 30 stitches, mak- 
ing 80 in all. Knit 5 
rounds plain. 

Sixth round — Nar- 
row, th o and repeat 
around the work. 

Knit 7 rounds plain. 

Fourteenth, Fifteenth, 
Sixteenth and Seven- 
teenth rounds. — Th o, k 
3, n, and repeat. 

Eighteenth round. — 
Knit plain. 

Nineteenth round. — 
K 1, th o, si and b, k 
2 and repeat. 

Twentieth routid. — 
K 2, th o, si and b, k 
1 and repeat. 

Twenty-first round. 
— K 3, th o, si and b, 
and repeat. 

Knit 14 rounds 
plain; then knit 38 
rounds in ribbed knit- 
ting (k 2, p 2). 

The thumb is be- 
gun in the 77th round. 
The first 5 rounds of 
the mitten are turned 
in and hemmed. The 
rest of the directions 
for knitting the mitten 
will be found in the 
general rule for knitting mittens, on page 51. 

Plain loose mittens of this style are comfortable 
articles to wear either over kid gloves on very cold 
days, or without gloves. Fine wool makes a warmer 
mitten than silk and is almost as pretty in effect. 




1 



HMfflfflffln 



l§§§ 





No. 



Knitted 



78 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




No. 39.— Ladies' Knitted 
Silk Stocking. 



Ladies' Knitted Silk Stockings. 

No. 39. — This stocking is knitted with knitting 
silk of dark color and No. 18 needles. The 
leg and the top of the foot are in ribbed knitting, 
and the heel, toe, and sole in plain knitting. Cast 
124 stitches equally on 4 needles, and knit 317 
rounds for the leg, 2 
stitches plain, and 2 stitch- 
es purled alternately; be- 
gin to narrow for the ankle 
in the 199th round by 
knitting 3 stitches toge- 
ther after the first 7 stitch- 
es, and before the last 5 on 
each side of the middle of 
the back, and in the 200th 
round narrow in the same 
manner after the first 6, 
and before the last 4 
stitches; repeat the nar- 
rowing in the 222nd and 
223rd, 246th and 247th, 
and 269th, and 270th 
rounds. After completing 
the 317th round, put the 
last 24 and the first 22 
stitches together on one 
needle for the heel; add a thread of fine silk to the 
working thread to strengthen it, and knit 38 rows 
forward and back, 1 plain and 1 purled alternately, 
so that all will look plain on the right side, and al- 
ways slipping the first stitch. When there are 18 
stitches up each side of the heel leave off with a 
purled row. In the next row* knit to the 5th stitch 
pass the middle, slip the 5th, knit the next, and 
pass the slipped stitch over it; knit the next, turn, 
slip the first stitch, and purl to the 5th stitch past 
the middle; slip the 5th, purl the next, and pass 
the slipped stitch over it; purl the next, turn, and 
repeat from *, always slipping the first stitch on 
the other side of the opening formed until all the 
stitches are knitted off from each side. Take up 
the 18 stitches on the left side of the heel on a 
needle, knitting each as it is taken up; knit around 
to the opposite side, and take up the 18 stitches on 
the right side in the same manner. In the next 70 
rounds the 46 stitches on the top of the foot are 
worked in ribbed knitting, and the stitches for the 
gussets and sole in plain knitting; to form the gus- 
sets, narrow in the next 2nd and in every following 
4th round on the stitches next to the ribbed knit- 
ting of the front on each side; narrow 9 times in all 
on each side. After the 70th about 76 more rounds 
are required to complete the stocking. In the 23rd 
of these knit together the first 2 and the last 2 
stitches of the instep, and the first 2 and the last 2 
stitches of the sole; then in every following 4th 
round narrow on both sides of each of the first nar- 
rowings, 12 times in all. Next, in order to point 
the stocking, work 2 similar narrowings in a straight 
line above each of the first narrowings, and then 
narrow in the manner previously described in every 
following 2nd round until the narrowings of both 



halves meet, whereupon knit 2 stitches together 
until all the stitches are used up. 

Knitted Cuffs. 

No. 40. — Cast on 80 stitches and knit to and fro 
as follows, for 18 rows: Purl 3 rows, knit 3 rows. 
The foundation counts as the first row so that it 
must be purled off in the second row. 

Now add or cast on 25 new stitches in the fourth 
row to begin the first of the loops seen. Knit them 
in the 5th and 6th rows and cast off in the 7th. 
At the end of the 10th and 12th rows the last 
stitches must be knitted together with the end 
stitches of the loop-part of the work. 

Repeat from the 1st to the 18th rows 10 times; 
and in order to join the separate loops knit together 
the 5th to the 8th stitches which are cast on for the 
next loop with the 21st to the 18th cast on for the 
previous loop, also joining the last loop to the first. 

Take up the foundation stitches onto another 
needle and knit them off together with those of the 
last row, to close the cuff. 

The purled stitches of the loops form the right 
side when the work is turned back as seen in the 
picture. 

Knitted Shawl. 

(No Illustration.) 

This shawl is not only easy to knit but is very 
pretty and effective. It may be made of Shetland 
or any wool of equal fineness. Use long coarse 
bone needles. 

Cast on 225 stitches; knit across 6 times plain. 

Seventh row. — Slip the first stitch, knit 5, knit 3 
together, knit last stitch without slipping it from 
the needle; then bring the wool forward and purl 
it, still keeping it on the needle; then put the wool 
back, and knit it this time, slipping it off; this 
makes 3 stitches out of 1; knit 3 together again, then 
as before, and so on until 
but 6 stitches remain; knit 
these plain. The last stitch 
before the 6 plain, must al- 
ways be widened, if you 
narrow on commencing 
the row. 

Eighth row. — Knit 
plain. 

Ninth row. — Same as 
7th, excepting widening 
the 7th stitch, and so on; 
that is, always widen the 
stitch that was narrowed 
before, and vice versa. Knit 
in this manner 230 times 
across; then knit 6 times 
plain, and bind off loosely to complete the shawl. 

To Stretch the Shawl. 

Wring a sheet in clear water, and pin it to the 
carpet, then stretch the shawl, and pin closely 
around the edge over the sheet. Pin it at night, 
and in the morning the sheet will be dry, and the 
shawl stretched. Deep, crocheted scollops with 
fluffy edges form a pretty border. 




No. 40. — Knitted Cuff. 






THE ART OF KNITTING. 



'9 



Knitted Sleeping Socks. 

No. 41. — Use Germantown wool and steel needles 

in two sizes, Nos. 12 and 14; 4 needles of each 

size will be required. 

To begin: Take the No. 12 needles and on each 

of 2 of them cast 30 stitches, and 34 on a third 
needle. With the 4th 
knit. 

First row. — Knit 2 and 
purl 2 alternately. Work 
in this manner for ij^ 
inch; then knit a row as 
follows: Throw the wool 
forward, and knit 2, al- 
ternately. 

Work 1^ inch like the 
first row; then purl 8 
rows. Now knit 1, purl 1, 
alternately for 6 inches. 
The decrease is now 
commenced. 

Mark a stitch in the 
center of a needle by ty- 
ing a piece of cotton in it, 
knit 2 together before and 
after this stitch in every 
5th round for 10 inches; 
in the next round divide 
the stitches as you would 
for the toe of a stocking, 
putting half the stitches on 
one needle for front of 
foot; the back half divide 
on 2 needles and work the 
stitches off on needles No. 
14; decrease by knitting 
2 together at the begin- 
ning and end of the front 
needle, at the beginning 
of the next needle, and 
the end of the third nee- 
dle in every other round 
until 24 stitches only are 
left; cast off and sew up 
the toe. The top is turned 
down on the outside and 

hemmed leaving the " wool forward and k 2 row " 

as the edge. 

Knitted Under Cap for Elderly Ladies. 

No. 42. — This cap is to be worn under a bonnet, 
for added warmth. Use dark brown Saxony yarn 
or split zephyr and fine steel needles. Cast on 8 
stitches and close into a circle. 

First round. — Knit plain. 

Second round. — Th o, k 1, and repeat. 

Third and every odd round. — Knit plain. 

Fourth round. — Th o, k 2 and repeat. 

Sixth and every even round to the Twenty-sixth, in- 
clusive. — Like fourth, except that there will be an 
extra stitch to knit between each put-over, in 
every round. 




No. 41. - Knitted Sleeping 
Sock. 



Twenty-seventh to the Forty-second round inclusive. 
— Knit plain. 

Now leave 30 stitches for the back of the cap, 
and knit to and fro on the remaining 82 stitches, 
36 rows, all to appear knitted on the right side. 
This effect is produced by knitting across and purl- 
ing back. 

Next take up the side stitches and knit 6 rounds 
in rib pattern k 2, p 2, to form the edge. Cast 
off the stitches and the cap is complete. The cap, 
knitted in pretty colors may be worn by a child; 
and in this event it may have a border of looped 
knitting, crocheted shells or swan's down about its 
edges. 

Knitted Mitts. 

(No Illustration.) 

Knitted mitts are necessary luxuries that are 
easily made of Berlin wool, Saxony yarn, etc., on 
No. 14 steel needles. 

Cast on 39 stitches. Slip the first stitch of every 
row. K 1 row. For the thumb k 10, turn and k 
back. 

Next row. — K 12, turn, and k back. Continue 
to k 2 stitches more every 2nd row until there are 
28 stitches knitted off. 

Next row. — K to the end. K 1 row. 

Next row. — K 28, turn, and k back. Continue 
to leave 2 unknit till there are 10 on the needle. 

Next row. — Cast off 10 and k to the end. K 1 
row and cast on 10. K 12. 

Next row.—JL 9, p 1, * k 1, pi; repeat from * 
9 times, k 9. K 7 rows. 

Next row. — K 9, pi, *ki, pi; repeat from * 
9 times; k 9. Repeat from ''k 7 rows." 

K 26 rows. Cast off, and on the right side, which 
is the other side from that on which the pattern 
rows were knitted, pick up 48 stitches, 1 in each 
turn along the top. K the 1st stitch of every row. 
K 36 rows ribbed, 2 plain, 2 purl, alternately, and 
cast off. Sew up and double over this ribbed 
piece for a finish at the top of the wrist. 

The other mitt is 
knitted the same, ex- 
cept that the 3 pattern 
rows on the back of it 
are knitted on the op- 
posite side. 

Mitts of this kind 
are very useful during 
shopping expeditions, 
sleigh-rides, long walks, 
skating, coasting and 
various pastimes where 
an ordinary glove is 
not warm enough and 
mittens are considered 

too clumsy.' Mitts leave the finger tips free, thus 
possessing an advantage over mittens. They may 
be made of black, blue, brown, drab or dark red; 
or, two colors may be united in knitting them, 
one color being used for the wrist-portion and the 
other for the hand and thumb; or, if two colors 
are used they may be knitted in stripes. 




No 42. — Knitted Under 
Cap for Elderly Ladies. 



so 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Ladies' Knitted Evening Mittens. 

No. 43. — These mittens, which are worn to pro- 
tect delicate evening gloves, are knitted with white 
Saxony wool on rather coarse steel needles, as the 
work is to be quite loose. Cast 60 stitches on 3 
needles, and knit 60 rounds in ribbed knitting, 2 
stitches plain and 2 purled. Then follow with 70 
rounds of plain knitting for the hand. In the 3rd 
round of the 70 begin to widen for the thumb gore; 
widen at both sides of the first 2 stitches to begin, and 
then 5 times thereafter, with intervals of 2 rounds 
between, in a line above the previous widenings; 
for the widenings, 
having knitted the 
first 2 stitches men- 
tioned, knit a stitch 
crossed out of the 
succeeding horizon- 
tal mesh; (for cross- 
ed knitting, insert 
the needle down- 
ward at the back in- 
stead of upward at 
the front), and purl 

the following stitch; then having knitted the round, 
purl the stitch that precedes the 2 named, and knit 
1 crossed out of the horizontal mesh succeeding it; 
at each successive widening round, the number of 
stitches between the widenings will naturally be in- 
creased. After the last widening round (the 18th 
round) knit two more rounds, then take the stitches 
of the thumb gore on separate needles and knit 24 
rounds for the thumb, in the last four of which 
point it. Then continue the hand. In the first 
round, out of the mesh connecting the ends of the 
thumb stitches, knit two stitches crossed; in the 
following round knit two stitches together on both 
sides of these two stitches, and in the succeeding 
round knit each one of these stitches together with 
the one beside it, thus forming a small gusset. The 
hand is narrowed in the last 11 rounds; in the 
first of these, knit two stitches together at both sides 
of the first stitch and at both sides of the middle 
stitch, the narrowing before the stitch to be knit 
plain and that after crossed. In every following 
2nd round narrow in the same manner; then in the 
last round divide the stitches into halves, and cast 
off, knitting the stitches of both halves together in 
pairs. 

Knitted Over-Shoes. 

No. 44. — Germantown wool of any dark rich 
color preferred may be used in knitting these 
over-shoes. 

Begin at the top part of the back of the heel. 
Cast on 26 stitches. Work with 2 needles, knitting 
and purling alternately for 32 rows. 

Thirty-third row. — Knit 8. Take a third needle, 
and knit 10 (leave the 8 stitches on the other 
needles for the present), purl and knit the 10 
stitches alternately for the 10 rows. 

After these rows (which must be finished as 
begun by a knitted row), knit off the 8 stitches 




No. 43.- — Ladies' Knitted Evening Mitten. 



that were left before working the heel. 

Forty-fourth row. — Purl 8, pick up the 10 side 
stitches of the heel, purl 10, pick up the 10 stitches 
ori the other side of the heel, purl 8. 
You will now have 46 stitches. 
In the next 4 rows decrease 1 in every knitted 
row by knitting 2 together after the first stitch. 
Continue for 50 rows without increase or decrease, 
alternately knitting and purling. 

In the 97th row cast on 24 more stitches, knit 6 

rounds plain. You will need 4 needles for this. 

In the 104th round, * knit 6, slip 1, knit 1, pass 

the slipped stitch over. Repeat from * all round. 

Work 6 rounds 
without decrease in 
plain knitting. 

One Hundred and 
Eleventh round. — * 
Knit 5, slip 1, knit 
1, pass the slipped 
stitch over. Repeat 
from * all round. 

Work 4 rounds 
plain knitting with- 
out decrease. 
One Hundred and Sixteenth roimd. — * Knit 4, slip 
1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over. Repeat 
from *. 

Work 3 rounds in plain knitting. 
One Hundred and Twentieth round. — Knit 3, slip 
1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over. Repeat 
from *. 

Work 2 rounds in plain knitting. 
One Hundred and Twenty-third round. — Knit 2, 
slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over. Repeat. 
One Hundred and Twenty-fourth round. — Plain 
knitting. 

One Hundred and Twenty-fifth round. — Knit r, 
slip 1, knit 1, pass the slipped stitch over. Repeat. 
In the next rounds knit 2 together until reduced 
to 1 stitch; fasten off on the wrong side. 




No. 44. — Knitted Over-Shoe. 



With the 4 needles pick up all the stitches on 
the top of the shoe. Knit as follows: 

First round. — Knit 2, purl 2. Repeat all round. 

Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth rounds. — 
The same as first. 

Seventh and Eighth rounds. — Plain knitting. 
Cast off. 

This shoe is intended to be worn over the boot 
in cold and frosty weather. It is fastened round 
the ankle with a bow of ribbon. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



81 



Dictions for Knitting Various arti(lgs anD 
garagnts for Whi(h no illustrations are giVgn. 



To Knit a Vest in One Piece. 

This garment is knit all in one piece, beginning 
at the lower edge of one side, and is sewed up 
under the arm. Use Saxony or Spanish knitting 
yarn and quite coarse bone or wooden needles. 
It is a good plan to shrink the yarn before using 
or winding it. Dip the skeins in warm water, 
squeeze and shake them out and hang them in 
the air to dry. 

Cast on 78 stitches, knit backwards and forwards 
for 22 inches, then increase one at the end of every 
row until you have 20 more stitches at each end than 
you had at starting. These 20 stitches form half the 
gusset under the arm. Now, knit across, and at the 
end of the row cast on 24 stitches; knit back and 
cast on 24 at the other end — these are for the 
sleeve. Knit 15 rows across the whole 166 stitches; 
then knit 48 stitches and cast off all except 48 
stitches at the other end — this is the opening for 
the head. Knit 54 rows across this last 48 stitches, 
and then slip them onto a spare needle or a string; 
knit 54 rows across the first 48, and in the 55th row 
cast on as many stitches as you cast off (should be 
70). Pick up the 48 stitches on the string and 
knit 15 rows across the lot, then cast off 24 stitches 
at each end and decrease one at each end till you 
have 78 stitches; knit 22 inches and cast off. Sew 
up under each arm, and finish with a crocheted edge 
around the neck and sleeves. These vests are 
more comfortable to wear if the body part is 
ribbed; and the sleeve might have an inch of ribs 
at the edge instead of crochet, as plain knitting 
curls up when worn. 

Vests of this kind are very easily knitted in 
ribbed style, by purling 2 and knitting 2 stitches 
alternately throughout the work. They may be 
knited without any widenings at all, as they are 
very elastic and shape themselves to the figure. 
A sleeveless ribbed Lisle thread or Swiss wool vest 
is a good pattern to copy after in knitting the neck 
and shoulders. A crochet border may be added to 
the neck and arm-hole edges of a knitted vest for 
the insertion of ribbons; and a wide fancy border 
may be crocheted about the lower edges, unless a 
fancy border is knitted while making the garment. 

Full or half-length sleeves may be knitted, sewed 
up and joined to the arm-hole if desired; but the 
small cap sleeves are not advisable as they roll up 
about the arm-hole in a very uncomfortable manner. 

Some very pretty vests knitted from white Span- 
ish yarn, were made in ribbed style in the low- 
necked sleeveless shape. The square neck was 
then filled in in a fancy crochet stitch until high 
enough to be drawn close about the neck with a 
ribbon. The top of the crocheted portion was 
6 



large enough to easily admit the head. (No length- 
wise opening had been left, but one could easily be 
arranged by crocheting the rows back and forth 
instead of round and round.) A pretty edge was 
crocheted about the " arm-hole, and a border an- 
eighth of a yard deep was crocheted about the 
lower edge. When the vests Avere on they fittted 
very snugly and there were no buttons to come off 
or imperfectly close them. Ribbon, run into the 
arm-hole borders held this part of the garment 
closely to the shoulder. 

Knitted Sleeves. 

Sleeves of this description are very comfortable 
to slip on under a loose or short cape or wrap. 
They may be made of Berlin wool, Germantown or 
Spanish knitting yarn, or any other yarn preferred. 
Four No. 14 steel needles will be needed in knitting 
them. Cast on 120 stitches — 40 on each of 3 needles 
— and knit as follows : 

For 60 rounds. — Knit 2, purl 2. 

61st to 70th rounds. — Plain knitting. 

71st to 80th rounds. — Knit 2, purl 2 alternately. 

81st to 90th rounds. — Plain knitting. 

91st to 100th rounds. — Knit 2, purl 2 alternately. 

101st to 226th rounds. — Plain knitting, with the 
exception of the seam for back of sleeve, which is 
made in every 3rd round by knitting a stitch at 
the back instead of the front, as usual, and the de- 
crease, which is made by knitting 2 together — that 
is, after working 2 stitches from the seam, you knit 
the 3rd and 4th stitches together, and knit the 3rd 
and 4th stitches together before the seam at the 
finish of the round. 

The decrease is made in the 107th, 115th, 123rd, 
131st, 139th, 147th, 155th, 163rd, and 171st rounds. 
Eight plain rounds between. 

179th round. — After decreasing 2 on each side of 
the seam, knit 2 together 3 times more at equal 
distances in the round. 

180th to 188th rounds. — Plain knitting. 

189th round. — The same as 179th round. 

190th to 200th rounds. — Plain knitting. 

201st round. — The same as 179th round. 

202nd to 209th rounds. — Plain knitting. 

210th round. — The same as 179th round. 

211th to 219th rounds. — Plain knitting. 

220th to 21fJfth rounds. — Knit 2, purl 2. Cast off. 

Knit the other sleeve to correspond. If desired, 
sew a neck strap to the top of the sleeves. 

A Knitted Scarf or "Cloud." 

A scarf or "cloud" may be easily knitted from 
Shetland or Ice wool, or from split zephyr as follows: 
(Use smooth bone or wooden needles.) 

Cast on 300 stitches and knit 300 rows back and 



82 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



forth. The knitting should be very loose, and 
when completed the "cloud" should be long 
enough to go twice round the neck and once round 
the head. Finish the ends with fringe or 2 large 
tassels made of the same kind of wool. 

Knitted Combination. 

Angola wool is used for this garment, which is 
knitted on No. 16 or 18 needles. Begin at the 
knee, as follows: Cast on 90 or 100 stitches, and 
rib a piece 4 inches long; then plain all round, in- 
creasing on the inside of the leg each side of the 
seam (for which 3 stitches should be left), 7 times 
every 5th row, then 15 times every 4th row, then 13 
times every 3rd row. This makes 70 increases. 
At the seam turn back, purl 2 stitches, and then 
purl 2 together, then purl to end of row. Knit back 
plain, knitting twice into the 2nd stitch Continue 
purl and plain alternately as though on 2 needles. 
Purl 2 together in every 4th row 10 times, and in- 
crease 1 stitch every 2nd row 20 times at the other 
end. There will now be 170 or 180 stitches in all. 
Both legs are done the same so far, except in purl- 
ing back from the seam in the 2nd leg increase 1st 
stitch and knit 2 together last, to make the right and 
left legs. Now take the two ends where 2 stitches 
have been knitted together, and join them, making 
plain and purl from one end to the other, and slip 
the 1st stitch at each end. Continue knitting 2 to- 
gether every 4th row 14 times in the center as be- 
fore. Now count 64 stitches each side of the front 
seam, and then count 4 more stitches for a seam, 
and knit 2 together each side of the seam. Knit 2 
together each side of the 3 seams every 4th row 6 
times. There are now 108 stitches inside the two 
side seams. Take the 72 stitches outside one of 
the side seams, and knit backwards and forwards 
on that back piece only. Leave 2 or 3 stitches in- 
side each time to make the outside end longer than 
the end by the seam. About 30 rows must be done 
like this, and in the last 10 rows knit 2 together 
every row at the outside end. Knit round and work 
the same the other side. Of the 20 stitches that 
were before increased each side, 10 have been knit- 
ted off; the other 10 must now be lapped over each 
other at the back, where the ends are joined to- 
gether; and where the 20 stitches lap, each 2 stitches 
must be knitted as one. Now there are 220 stitches 
altogether on the needles. Work round all plain 
on the 4 needles as usual for about 4 inches; then 
divide in half in front and purl back as on 2 nee- 
dles. Work thus for 15 or 16 rows, then take 56 
stitches by the opening in front, and knit twice into 
each of the 4 middle stitches; knit to end of row and 
purl back. Next row knit twice into each of the 8 mid- 
dle stitches; make 3 rows; then knit twice into each of 
the 12 middle stitches. There are now 80 stitches. 
ivlake3 inches; then knit the 2 stitches each side of the 
24, knit 2 together every 3rd row till the 24 are 
reduced to 3, as before. Knit 3 inches more; then 
cast off 1 2 inches on the inside for the neck, and make 
2 inches more to go over the shoulder, and cast off. 
Make the other front side the same. Take the 108 
stitches at the back and work till it is as long as the 



front; then cast off 24 stitches in the center. Take 
the 42 stitches on one side and make 2 inches more, 
and knit together with the front shoulder-piece 
and cast off. Make the other shoulder the same. 

Now pick up the slip stitches round the arm- 
hole on 4 needles, and underneath the arm, to 
make the gusset, leave 2 stitches for the seam, and 
knit 2 together each side of it every other row, till 
there are only 70 or 80 stitches left. Knit the 
sleeve as long as required; rib 2 inches to make it 
fit closely, and cast off. 

With 2 needles pick up the stitches down the 
opening at the back, and make it as much broader 
as it is required. Make each side separately. On 
one side, for the button-hole, cast off3 stitches, and 
in their place put on 3 stitches more. 

To make a low neck, cast off when the 3 inches 
are done, after increasing the 24 stitches; the 40 
stitches, or the shoulder-piece must also be made 
longer; cast off at the back as in front. 

Knitted Night or Bed Socks. 

With No. 12 needles and white Germantown 
yarn, cast on 70 stitches; this is for the sole of the 
foot. Knit 18 plain rows, making 1 stitch by knit- 
ting 2 in the 2nd stitch at the beginning of each 
row. Then knit 18 more rows, increasing at the 
beginning of each alternate row only; this end is 
for the toe. In the 37th row you ought to have 97 
stitches on your needle. Work from the toe to 
the heel, and knit 60 stitches; turn, knit back; 
on these 60 stitches knit 22 rows; then at the end 
of the 60 stitches cast on 37. Now knit 18 rows, 
decreasing 1 every alternate row at the toe end, 
then knit 18 rows, decreasing 1 at the beginning 
of each row, and cast off. Now pick up the 37 
stitches for the leg, also pick up n stitches along 
the top of the 22 rows, and then knit the 37 left; 
on these knit 46 rows of knit 2, purl 2 stitches, 
then cast off loosely. Sew up the leg and the sole, 
drawing the toe-tip to form a nice square. 

Knitted Evening Wrap. 

White, double Berlin wool, and blue knitting silk 
or blue spangled wool, will make a pretty eve- 
ning wrap. Use thick wooden needles, cast on 80 
or 90 stitches with the white, and knit 6 rows; * 
join on the silk with a neat knot, and knit 4 rows. 
Break off and join on the white again, and knit 5 
rows. Repeat from *, knitting alternate stripes of 
white and blue, and always being careful to have 
each fastening of wool on the same edge of the 
wrap, and there will then be a right and wrong 
side to the work. 

When the silk is nearly used up, make two large 
tassels about 5 inches deep with the white, inter- 
weaving a little of the silk. Having knit with the 
white last, cast off, draw each end together with a 
needle, and fasten a tassel at each end. The wrap 
should be about 2^ yards long. A hood for the 
head might be formed on one end by omitting the 
tassel, drawing the ends together in the necessary 
shape, and finishing with a ribbon bow. Pompa- 
dour wool might be used in place of the silk. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



83 



Knitted Three-Cornered Shawl. 

The materials required are equal quantities of 
white and blue single zephyr, or Shetland floss, 
and one pair of long knitting needles, No. 10. 

This shawl is easily made, as it is in plain knit- 
ting throughout. It is a half or three-cornered 
shawl, and the work is begun at the edge of the 
border; that is, you must cast on the stitches for 
both sides of the shawl; 700 will be required. 
Begin with the white yarn. 

Work 6 rows, and in each alternate row knit 2 to- 
gether, at the beginning, middle and end of the row. 

Six rows blue, 6 rows white, 24 rows blue, 6 
rows white, 6 rows blue. Knit the remainder of 
the shawl with white. 

The fringe is of the blue wool. It is made by 
knitting the wool four times double upon steel 
needles — No. 14 — as you would knit a garter; knit 
as tightly as possible. When you have finished 
the knitting, steam it over boiling water, until quite 
damp, and while damp, press it with a flat iron until 
dry. Put a cloth over the wool, and be careful 
not to scorch it. Pull out the knitting gently, so as 
not to destroy the crimp. ■ Cut it in lengths of ten 
inches, keeping the four strands together, and with 
a large-eyed, wool-needle draw through the outer 
loops of the border. Bind round four strands of 
the wool with white silk floss at equal distances. 
When the fringe is tied in, the shawl is complete. 
This will be found a very serviceable design for a 
Summer wrap, as it is comparatively light, yet 
sufficiently warm. 

Round Shoulder Cape in Loop Knitting. 

Round shoulder capes in loop knitting require 
about 12 ounces of Berlin wool or Germantown, 
and bone needles No. 9. Cast on 32 stitches. 
Knit 3 rows plain. 

Fourth row. — * Put the needle into the first stitch, 
wind the wool between the needles and over the 
two fingers of the left hand 4 times, and again 
between the needles; draw the stitch through. 
Knit all the stitches of the row in the same way. 
Knit 5 rows plain. Repeat from * until there are 
8 rows of loops. 

Knit 10 more rows of loops with 5 plain rows 
between, decreasing at the beginning and end of 
each row of loops by knitting 2 stitches together. 
Cast off. Knit 7 pieces the same way and sew 
them together. Knit a strip of loops with the 5 
plain rows between for the neck, and sew it to the 
cape. Line this collar with ribbon, leaving ends to tie. 

For a cape of a smaller size, use bone needles 
No. 8, and cast on 23 stitches. Knit 3 rows plain. 
Repeat from * to * as for the larger cape, until 
there are 10 rows of loops, then decrease by knitting 
2 together at the end of the 3rd row, and continue 
to decrease in the same way until there are 10 
stitches left. Cast off. Knit 8 of these pieces, 
and sew them together. For the collar cast on 
about 8 stitches, and knit rows 'of loops with 5 
plain rows between. Make this of the size required, 
and sew it on. the cape. 



Knitted Cloud. 

This is a simple and showy design for a knitted 
cloud. For a brunette, contrasting threads of pale 
lemon Berlin and black Andalusian wool, make a 
pretty combination. A pretty contrast for a fair 
person, is delicate blue Berlin and pink Andalusian. 
For an elderly lady, cream Berlin and pure white 
Andalusion is extremely effective. The same pat- 
tern looks equally well made of Saxony and knit- 
ting silk, but whatever threads are used, they must 
not be of the same size. Two rather large, long rub- 
ber needles are needed. With Berlin wool cast on 
the number of stitches required to make the cloud 
as wide as you desire it. Eighteen inches wide and 
two or two and a-half yards in length, make a large 
cloud or scarf. Knit 2 plain rows, then knit 2 
plain rows with Andalusian wool. Repeat the two 
stripes throughout the entire length of the cloud. It 
is unnecessary to break the threads at end of each 
row. Just let the thread you are not working with 
hang loosely at one side until you knit back again. 

Bed Socks. 

Use white Berlin or Germantown wool, and two 
No. 5 needles. Cast on 40 stitches and for 20 
rows knit in rib style — 2 plain, 2 purl. At the end 
of the 21st row cast on 12 more stitches, and knit 
back plain, casting on 12 more stitches at the end 
of this (22nd) row. (All the rest of the knitting is 
plain.) There will now be 64 stitches on the nee- 
dle. Increase at the end of every row for 10 rows, 
when you will have 74 stitches on the needle. 
Next knit 6 rows plain. Then decrease at the end 
of every row until the number of stitches is again 
64, and cast off. Fold the work together and sew 
it up. The sock will prove to be of excellent 
shape. 

Knitted Beaded Silk Cuffs. 

Thread a whole ball of knitting silk, scantily, 
with round beads of the same or a contrasting 
color. The whole ball must be threaded before 
beginning, because beads cannot be added after 
the work is begun without breaking the thread. 

Use rather fine needles, and cast on 10 stitches; 
knit back, turn, and knit back again, pushing a 
bead onto each loop as you knit it. The beads 
are only on the alternate rows. Continue until 
you have 45 rows of beads, then cast off, and sew 
up the cuff. If the cuff is too long, cast on fewer 
stitches. 

Knitted Wristers. 

On each of two needles cast 20 stitches, and 30 
on 1, and knit around once, plain. Then knit 1, 
th o, knit 3, slip 1, narrow, pass the slipped stitch 
over, knit 3, th o, knit 1, th o, knit 3, slip 1, narrow 
and pass slipped stitch as before, and continue in 
this way around the work. Make a stitch at the end 
of each needle. To make a larger wrister, add as 
many scollops as required, using 10 stitches for 
each scollop. Bind off loosely. 



84 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



"$vteATeitf," geLT<;, $(&^f$, Tie$, hunting (ap$, 



„ Foot-Ball Sweater. 

No. i. — In making this sweater for a man whose 
chest measure is 36 inches, a pound and a-half of 
eight-fold Midnight Germantown wool (white) will 
be needed; also 3 bone or rubber knitting needles, 
each measuring half an inch around. Two steel 
needles, No. 12, will also be necessary in knitting 
the collar, wrists 
and border. 

The body portion 
is knitted all in one 
piece and sewed up 
under the arms. 
There is no open- 
ing except at the 
neck, which is made 
large enough to slip 
the head through. 

To make the 
sweater illustrated, 
begin by casting 96 
stitches onto one of 
the steel needles 
for the lower edge. 
In making a larger 
or smaller sweater, 
add or decrease 5 
stitches for every 
inch (chest meas- 
ure), larger or 
smaller. 

First row. — Knit 
2, purl 2, across the 
row. 

Second r oiv . — 
Work back, knitti?ig 
the purled stitches 
and purling the knitted ones to keep the pattern. 

Third row. — Reverse the pattern so that the 
knitted stitches will come over the purled ones, and 
the purled stitches over the knitted one?,. This will 
form the familiar block or basket pattern. Con- 
tinue these details until the work is 9 blocks or 
18 rows deep. This will form a tight, firm border. 

JVineteetith row. — Now use the rubber needles 
and knit in rib style (knit 1, purl 1) for 157 rows. 

In the next (158th row) rib ^ stitches for the 
right shoulder; then bind off 30 for the neck, and 
on a third needle rib the remaining 33 stitches for 
the left shoulder. Rib 3 rows on each shoulder; 
then on the right-hand needle cast 30 stitches to 
correspond with those bound off for the neck. 

Now put all the stitches onto one needle and 
continue to rib 157 rows for the other side of the 
sweater. 




No. 1. — Foot-Ball Sweater. 



Then take the steel needles (in the 158th row of 
this side) and knit 9 blocks for the border to 
match those first knitted. 

Next sew up the sides, over-and-over, for 20 

inches, beginning at the lower edges of the sweater. 

To make the Sleeves. — For each take up 100 

stitches around the arm-hole, using 2 needles and 

placing 50 stitches on each. The seam of the 

sleeve must come 
under the arm. 
Then rib back and 
forth for 15 rows. 

Sixteenth row. — 
Put the stitches all 
onto one needle, 
and knit as before, 
narrowing one 
stitch at each end 
of the needle in 
every following fifth 
row, until you have 
narrowed 13 times, 
and the sleeve is 80 
rows in length. 
Then narrow in 
every other row un- 
til the sleeve is 115 
rows long. 

Now take the 
steel needles and 
knit until there are 
12 blocks of the 
border pattern (or 
24 rows). Bind off, 
and sew up the 
sleeve. 

To make and at- 
tach the Collar. — 
The collar is the most important part of the gar- 
ment, so far as construction is concerned. It must 
be large enough to slip over the head and yet snugly 
fit the neck. Use the large needles. Cast on 30 
stitches and knit back and forth in the block design 
until a strip long enough to meet around the head 
by stretching is made. Then sew the ends together, 
and try it on again to ascertain if it is large enough 
to quite easily slip it over the head and at the same 
time set well around the neck. In the sweater 
illustrated, the collar has a length of 44 blocks or 
88 rows of knitting, and will fit a head of ordinary 
size. When the collar is made, sew it to the neck 
of the sweater, holding the latter full or stretching 
it, as necessary, to make it fit the collar-edge. The 
collar seam should come a little back of one shoul- 
der. Turn the collar over half-way, as seen in the 
picture, and the garment is complete. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



85 




No. 2. — Gentleman's Knitted 
Hunting Cap. 



Gentleman's Knitted Hunting Cap. 

No. 2. — This cap may be made with gray zephyr 
or Germantown yarn on coarse steel knitting nee- 
dles. It is worked in plain and ribbed knitting, 
and is begun at the point above the crown in the 

middle of the 
front. 

Cast on 20 
stitches and knit 
back and forth, 
plain, for 55 
rows. Now take 
up on 2 extra 
needles, the side 
stitches of the 
strip just knit, 
and work 60 rows 
back and forth. 
Next, on another 
needle, cast 24 
stitches, and on 
all of the needles 
work 24 rounds 
in ribbed design, 
by knitting 2 and 
purling 2. This 
will form the 
throat portion. 

Now for the 
cape portion, di- 
vide the stitches onto 2 needles, placing 4 more on 
the back-portion than on the front, and having the 
24 middle stitches of the front portion come direct- 
ly underneath the 24 cast on above. Work 36 rows 
for the front portion and 24 for the back, narrow- 
ing once at the end of each row. Then cast off 
the remaining stitches. 

Now take up all the stitches around the front 
edge, using 3 needles, and picking up an even 
number. Work in rib style, (knit 2, purl 2), for 10 
rounds and cast off. 

The cap may be made of any dark color such as 
brown or gray. Bright colors should not be used, 
as they are too conspicuous in the hunting field. 

Knitted Suspenders. 

No. 3. — These • suspenders are knitted with 
Belding's knitting silk and coarse steel needles. To 
make them sufficiently firm the silk is used doubled. 

Begin at the crossed ends, and cast on 14 stitches 
for each suspender. Knit back and forth plain for 
5 rows. Now divide the stitches into two halves to 
form the button-hole, and knit back and forth on 
each division or half a sufficient distance to make a 
button-hole of the size usually seen in suspenders. 
Then slip the stitches all onto one needle again, 
and knit back and forth for about an inch and a- 
half. Divide the stitches once more and make a 
second button-hole like the first one. Now put 
the stitches again onto one needle and knit back 
and forth 6 times, increasing one stitch at the end 
of each row, which will make the number of 
stitches 20. 



Now begin the pattern or widest portion of each 
suspender as follows: 

First rati). — * Throw the thread forward, slip 1 as 
for purling, knit 2 together, and repeat from * across 
the row. 

Knit back in the same manner, and repeat until 
the suspender is long enough. The length must 
be decided according to the size of the individual 
who is to wear the suspenders. 

Now knit back and forth plain, decreasing one 
stitch at the end of each row until there are, 16 
stitches on the needle. Next divide the stitches 
evenly on 2 needles — 8 on each — to form the 
straps. Each strap is about 6 inches long when 
completed. Knit back and forth plain on each 
division for about an inch and a-half; then divide 
again to form the button-hole, making it the same 
as directed before. Next put all the stitches onto 
one needle, and knit plain until the strap measures 
about 5 inches long, then make another button- 
hole, finish as before, knit back and forth two or 
three times, and bind off. 

If preferred, the suspenders may be lined with 
silk or satin ribbon, and the straps may be of rib- 
bon elastic single or doubled. 

Knitted Suspenders. 

(No Illustration.; 

Knitted suspenders to be finished the same as 
the fancy ones seen on page 87 may be made as 
follows, either Belding's knitting silk or regular 
crochet silk being used for them: Cast on enough 
stitches to make the suspenders wide enough, being 
careful to 
have the 
number di- 
visible by 4. 

First row. 
— * K 1, n, 
th o, k 1 
and repeat 
from * en- 
tirely across 
the row. 

Se c o n d 
row. — Purl. 

Third 
row— *Nar- 
row, thread 
over, knit 2 
and repeat 
from * 
across the 
row. 

Purl back 
for the 
fourth row 
the same as 
for the second. 

Repeat these four rows until each suspender is 
long enough, and then proceed to mount them as 
previously suggested. Pale-blue, Nile-green, old- 
blue, black, yellow, red and dark-blue are favorite 
colors for suspenders. 




No. 3. — Knitted Suspenders. 



86 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Gentleman's Knitted Scarf-Tie. 



No. 4. — Use black, blue, 




No. 4.— Gentleman's Knitted 
Scarf-Tie. 



deep red or white 
crochet or knit- 
tin g silk, and 
steel needles of a 
suitable size. 

Cast on 32 
stitches and knit 
in ribs as fol- 
lows: 

First row. — 
Plain. 

Second roiv. — 
Purl. 

Third row. — 
Plain. 

Fourth row. — 
Purl. 

Fifth r ow . — 
Plain. 

This forms a 
purled rib. 

Sixth row. — 
Plain. 

Seventh row. — 
Purl. 

Eighth row. — 
Plain. 

Ninth row. — 
Purl. 

This forms a 
plain rib. 

Tenth row. — 
Purl. 

Eleventh renv. 
—Plain. 

Twelfth row. 
—Purl. 

Thirteenth row. 
—Plain. 



Fourteenth row. — Purl. 

This forms the second purled rib. 

Fifteenth row. — Purl. 

Sixteenth row. — Plain. 

Seventeenth row. — Purl. 

Eighteenth row. — Plain. 

Repeat from the first row for all the work. 

The first purled rib comes on the outside of the 
work. 

The scarf may be knitted in the four-in-hand or 
Ascot style as preferred. Either of the scarfs 
named may be used as a guide by which to shape 
the knitted tie; and the latter may be lined with 
satin ribbon or worn unlined, as preferred. Get 
the ribbon as wide as the widest portion and fell it 
in place, cutting and turning it under along the 
edges of the neck-band portion. The work should 
be narrowed down to 12 stitches for the band por- 
tion; and then if both ends of the scarf are to be 
wide, the work must be widened at the other end 
of the band. Narrow and widen by the usual 
methods as required to shape the tie to the desired 
form. 



In a four-in-hand, the band portion need not 
be widened at all but knit to the end on the 12 
stitches. A good length for a four-in-hand scarf 
is 42 inches. The broad portion should be about 
18 inches long before the narrowing begins; then 
narrow quickly down to the 12 stitches and work 
the remainder of the length on them. See diagram 
No. 9 on page 88 for shaping a four-in-hand. 
The dotted lines show how the end may be knitted 
straight, if the knitter does not wish to widen the 
end as at the unbroken lines. 

Knitted Lawn Tennis Belt. 

No. 5 — A very handsome tennis belt may be 
made for either a lady or gentleman by the direc- 
tions given below. Crochet or knitting silk of any 
color or colors desired may be used, and the 
needles selected should be of a size suitable 
for the silk. 

As a rule crochet silk makes firmer work than 
knitting silk, which is the softer of the two. 

Belt clasps of metal may be purchased at many 
stores, but in case they cannot be found, a cheap 
belt may be bought and its clasps removed to 
complete the knitted belt. The colors of a tennis 
club might be worked into a belt of this style, one 
color being used for the open-work, while between 
these sections might appear the other color. 

The design illustrated is a strong webbing and 
showy as well; but any other design preferred may 
be developed in a belt. A lining of strong silk or 
satin ribbon, or of belt-webbing may be used, if con- 
sidered necessary; and the belt may be made as. 
wide or as narrow as desired by using more or 
fewer stitches for the foundation. 

For the belt illustrated, cast on 32 or 34 stitches. 
Then knit in herring-bone pattern according to 




No. 5. — Knitted Lawn Tennis Belt. 



instructions found at No. 13, on page 13, of this 
book, making the belt as long as desired. The 
design used in knitting the scarf-tie illustrated 
at No. 4 on this page would form a pretty pat- 
tern for a belt; or, any of the fancy designs 
given in the first part of this book that may 
be deemed appropriate by the knitter, could be 
utilized in making a tennis belt. The latter 
may be worn by children as well as by ladies 
and gentlemen. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



87 



Fancy Suspenders. 

No. 6. — Knitted suspenders, like knitted or cro- 
cheted neck-ties, are 
very popular gifts from 
ladies to gentlemen. 
They are easily made, 
and may be mounted 
with the straps and 
buckles at home, or, 
they may be taken to 
a haberdasher's where 
they will be completed 
in first-class style. . It 
is not always an easy 
matter to obtain the 
straps and buckles, un- 
less a pair of suspen- 
ders is purchased and 
the attachment re- 
moved from them to 
be applied to the 
knitted suspenders. 
This is often done, how- 
ever. The attachments 
of the suspenders illus- 
trated were obtained 
from a manufacturer 
and the loops and cords 
were covered with nar- 
row ribbon of the same 
color as that used for 
lining (two widths 
being necessary), the 
ribbon being neatly 
over-handed together 
over the under side of 

the cords as may be seen by a close inspection of 
the engraving, which, for this purpose, shows one 
set of the loops turned wrong side out. 

The straps are of ribbon elastic of the same 
color as the lining, and each has a button-hole 
made in the end. They are fastened to the sus- 
penders under a machine- 
stitched shield of the satin _3==-=s== 
ribbon used for the lining. 
These straps may be made 
double if desired; and they 
may -be covered with satin 
ribbon put on very full in 
order to permit them to 
stretch as much as required. 

The suspender portions 
may be knitted in knob- 
stitch, herring-bone, or any 
of the fancy patterns seen in 
the front part of this book 
or that may be otherwise known to the knitter. 

Knitted Narrow Tie. 

No. 7. — The knob-stitch design, found on page 
12 of this book, will be a pretty pattern for a nar- 
row tie. 




No. 6. — Fancy Suspenders. 




No. f. — Knitted Narrow Tie. 



Cast on enough stitches to make the tie about 
an inch wide, or a trifle wider if desired, and knit 
until the strip is long enough to extend around the 

neck and tie in the knot 
seen in the engraving. 
It may be lined or not, 
as preferred. 

Knitted Jersey or 
Tennis Sash. 

(No Illustration.) 

A knitted silk sash 
for lawn tennis is a 
handsome present for a 
gentleman; or, it can 
be worn by small chil- 
dren under the name 
of a Jersey sash. Two 
ounces of smooth knit- 
ting-silk and two large 
steel needles are re- 
quired in making it. It 
should be about two 
and one-half yards long 
when finished, or 
stretched, and may be 
knit by either of the 
following designs or 
patterns: 

The first pattern is 
in brioche knitting, 3 
stitches to a pattern, 
and is as follows: Cast 
on 54 stitches. (Knit 
loosely, and when com- 
pleted also cast off 
loosely.) Make 1, slip i,knit 2 together; repeat to 
the end, making all the rows alike. 

The second design is like a web, every row the 
same, with 3 stitches to a pattern. It is knitted as 
follows: Cast on 54 stitches. Make r, knit 2 to- 
gether, knit 1 ; repeat to the end. 

If the brioche design is 
used, you will need 360 
lengths of fringe, each 14 in- 
ches long. The web design 
requires 340 lengths. Cut 
these lengths off first and 
knit all of the remaining silk 
into the sash. 

Fringe each end by knot- 
ting 10 lengths of the silk 
into each of the brioche pat- 
terns or ribs, or into each of 
the holes formed by the web 
design. Knot half of each 
tassel together with half of the next one at about 1 
inch from the top. The whole of each outside tassel 
must be knotted in with the next half. Shake out the 
fringe and cut the edges even. According to indi- 
vidual taste the fringe may be made heavier or light- 
er than suggested, or it may be knotted in any man- 
ner preferred. Blue or red will make a pretty sash. 






Wmm 



8J 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted Four-in-Hand Tie. (Knotted). 

No. 8. — The tie here seen is also knitted in the 
knob-stitch design and is 42 inches long. Its wide 

end is about 
2 fy inches 
long, and nar- 
rows down to 
1}^ inch for 
the band por- 
tion; and the 
latter width is 
kept to the end 
of the tie, ac- 
cording to the 
dotted lines in 
the diagram 
below, or 
slightly broad- 
ened to the di- 
mensions indi- 
cated by the 
unbroken 
lines. When 
s o widened, 
the widened 
end is about 6 
inches long 
and 2^ wide. 
The tie may be 
lined accord- 
ing to the di- 
rections given 
on this page ; 
or, like the tie 
seen at No. 10, 
which is knit- 
ted according 
to the instruc- 
tions given for 
No. 4, it need have no lining, although the latter 
renders it firmer. The diagram at No. 9 is simply 
to show the regular shape of a four-in-hand tie. The 
usual dimensions have been given in this description, 
and also in the instructions for No. 4 on page 86. 

How to Line a Knitted Neck-Tie. 

When the neck-tie is knitted, baste under it a 
strip of silk cut lengthwise of the goods, or a strip 
of ribbon that is as wide as the widest part of 

the tie. 

The silk strip must be cut wide enough to turn 




No. 8. — Knitted Four-in-Hand Tie. 
(Knotted.) 



enough in from the edge of the tie so that it will 
not show from the outside. 

If the tie is lined with ribbon, fell its edges down 
without turning them in except where the tie nar- 
rows; here the ribbon must be cut to follow the 
outline of the tie and turned under and felled 
down the same as the silk lining. 

No interlining is needed, and the lining should 
be of the same color as the tie, unless the latter is 
knitted so closely that the lining will not show 
through. A handsome cream-white tie was lined 
with cream-white satin ribbon, and across the ends 
the lining was confined by fancy stitching done in 
embroidery silk. The whole effect was both rich 
and very refined. 

Gentleman's Knitted Neck-Tie. 

(No Illustration.) 

A neck-tie may be knitted with silk of any shade 
desired, though black 
or white is generally 
used. Cast on, for the 
desired width of the 
tie, any number of 
stitches that may be 
divided by four and 
leave two remainder. 

First row. — Knit 2 
and purl 2 alternately. 

Second row. — Knit 2 
for the edge, * knit 2, 
purl 2, and repeat 
from *. 

Make 6 more rows 
of the ribbed work and 
then begin on the pat- 
tern as follows: 

First row.—* Knit 
2, purl 2 together, th 
o, and repeat from *, 
knitting 1 at the 
end. 

Second row. — Knit 4, 

* purl 2, knit 2 and re- 
peat from *. 

Third rcnu. — Knit 2, 

* th o, purl 2 together, 
knit 2 and repeat from *. 

Fourth row. — Knit 4, 
from *. 

Repeat these two designs until the tie is as long 
as you desire; then finish the end with ribbed 
work to correspond with the other end. 




No. 10. — Foitr-in-Hand Tie, 

Uklined and Unknotted. 

(For Description, pee Description 

No. 8.) 

* purl 2, knit 2 and repeat 



IJo. 9. — Diagkam Showing the Shape cf a Fouk-in-Hand Tie. (For Description, see Description No. 8.) 



in about one-fourth of an inch at each edge, and 
shaped to follow the outer edges of the tie. Fell 
it neatly along the edge and at the ends, just far 



Made of Saxony or single zephyr this would form 
a pretty scarf for a child, and could be finished at 
the end with fringe. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



89 



Gentleman's Storm or Hunting Cap. 

Nos. ii and 12. — In making this cap, use two 
shades of brown or drab Germantown yarn, and 




No. 11. — Gentleman's Storm or Hunting Cap. 



A " Cabman's Comforter." 

(No Illustration.) 

A "cabman's comforter" of Germantown wool is 
warm and useful for any person exposed to the 
cold, as it protects the back, chest and throat. 
The front and back are knitted first in separate 
pieces, then joined by knitting with 4 needles all 
around the neck. It is put on over the head, worn 
under the coat, and comes up to the ears, without 
covering them so as to muffle sounds. The direc- 
tions are for one of a medium size, but they can 
easily be made larger or smaller. 

About 5 ounces of wool are necessary and 4 No. 
9 bone neeedles, 2 to be used in knitting the front 
and back, and all 4 for the neck. Cast on 10 
stitches, and knit 1 row plain. * Knit the 1st stitch, 
throw wool forward to make 1 ; knit plain to last 
stitch; with the wool forward, slip the last stitch as 
if to purl. Repeat from * until there are 46 stitches 
on the needle. Knit plain 52 rows; knit the 1st 
stitch of every row, and with the wool forward, slip 
the last stitch as if to purl. 

Knit another piece exactly like this, then com- 
mence the neck, using 4 needles. Join the two 



steel needles of two sizes. The cap may be worn 
with the shield or flap turned up, or let down as 
illustrated. 

Begin at the crown, casting on one of the two 
finer needles, 210 stitches with the light wool. 
Work in rib stitch as follows : 

First row. — K 1, m 1, si 1 and repeat across the 
work. 

Second row. — Knit plain except that every made 
stitch and every adjoining slipped one are knitted 
off together. 

Repeat these two rows until there are 132 rows 
in all, or until the work measures 6^ inches in 
depth ; its width should be 45^ inches. The first 
4 rows are light, the next 4 dark, the next 120 light 
and the next 4 dark. 

Now cast off 48 stitches at the middle of the 
knitting for the face, leaving 81 stitches at each 
side. Continue to knit on each of the side divisions 
for 4 rows. Then cast the 48 stitches on again, and 
divide all of the stitches as evenly as possible on 4 
needles, closing the circle when beginning the first 
row of the edge. Begin with the light wool and 
knit 1 row and * purl 3 rows. Then join the dark 
wool and knit 5 rows plain. In each row, after 
every 6th stitch, slip 2, with the wool at the back 
of the work. In the 6th row, knit all the stitches 
off with the light wool, which has been joined for 
the purpose. Repeat from *, but the stitches 
slipped in this division of the pattern come be- 
tween those slipped in the first division (see No. 
12) and in this way the pattern is reversed. 

Ninety-three rows, knitted as directed, should 
make the edge or shield deep enough ; but this 
point must be allowed for by tight or loose knitting. 

Sew the seam of the head portion, rounding off 
the corners during the joining. 




No. 12. — Dktail for Border to Hunting Cap. 



pieces by knitting 2 together twice at each joining; 
knit 2, purl 2. There will now be 88 stitches. 
Knit this ribbed piece for the neck for about 6 
inches, then cast off loosely. 

Gentleman's Knitted Mitts. 

(For Illustration eee next Page.) 

No. 13 — These useful mitts are worked with 
wool of two good contrasting colors, say black and 
white, ruby and grey, blue and fawn, or other 
colors according to taste, the first-named colors 
being for the wrist and edging of the mittens, the 
latter for the hand part. With black wool, cast 
64 stitches on a No. 10 steel needle, and knit in 
ribbing, 2 stitches plain and 2 stitches purled for 40 



90 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




No. 13.- 



-Gentleman's Knitted 
Mitt. 



(For Description see this and 
preceding Page.) 



rows. Take the white wool and for the hand part, 
knit as follows: 
First row. — Plain. 

Second row. — i purl, i plain, and repeat. 
Third row. — i plain, i purl, and repeat. 
Fourth row. — i purl, i plain, and repeat. Re- 
peat the last two rows 
4 times. 

Thirteenth row. — Be- 
ginning at the side 
where the tag end of 
wool hangs, slip i, in- 
crease i by picking up 
the thread that lies di- 
rectly under the next 
stitch and knitting it, 
purl i, * knit i, purl i, 
and repeat from * to 
the end of the row. 

Fourteenth row. — 
Purl i, knit i and re- 
peat. 

Fifteenth row. — Slip 
i, increase i, knit i, 
purl- 1, * knit 4, purl 1 
and repeat from * to 
the end. 

Sixteenth row. — Purl 
1, knit 1, and repeat. 
Continue thus, always 
knitting the stitch that was purled, and purling the 
stitch that was knitted in the last row, and increas- 
ing at the beginning of every row that commences 
on the tag-end side of the work, till you get 88 
stitches on the needle, and 60 rows are knitted. 

Sixty-first row. — Without any increase, work 24 
stitches in ribbing (knit 1, purl 1)' for the thumb ; 
turn the work, and continue backwards and for- 
wards on these 24 stitches till 10 rows are done ; 
then take the black wool and with it knit 1 plain 
row and 4 rows of ribbing, and cast off. Recom- 
mence with white wool where you divide for the 
thumb, and knit 16 rows in pattern on the 64 
stitches; then take the black wool and knit 1 plain 
row and 4 rows of ribbing, and cast off. This is 
the mitt for the left hand. The right-hand mitt 
is worked in the same manner, only you commence 
the increasing for the thumb at the end of the 13th 
row instead of at the beginning and consequently 
when you get to the 61st row you have the 64 hand- 
stitches to begin upon; so you complete the hand 
part first, and finish off the thumb afterwards. Sew 
the mitts up neatly. 

Knitted Gloves. 

No. 14. — With Andalusian wool and four No. 16 
needles, this instruction will work out a large-sized 
glove for a lady, or one of small size for gentlemen. 
To make the glove larger or smaller, increase or 
diminish the number of stitches cast on, also using 
more or fewer for the fingers and thumb. 

Cast on 65 stitches — that is, 23 on one needle, 
22 on another, and 20 on the third; knit 3 and purl 
2 for four inches. 



For the hand, work 10 plain rounds. 

Eleventh round. — Begin the increase for the 
thumb by knitting 1 and purling 1 in the first 
stitch. Finish the round plain. 

Twelfth routid. — Knit the first stitch; knit 1 and 
purl 1 in the next stitch; knit the rest plain. 

Thirteenth round. — Plain. 

Repeat the last three rounds until you have in- 
creased 26 stitches, making 91 stitches on the 
needles. Thread a Berlin needle with coarse cotton, 
and pass it through the 27 stitches knitted for the 
thumb; tie the cotton. Continue to work in the 
round for 21 rounds with the four needles. 

We are now giving directions for working the 
right-hand glove, the palm of which is next the 
knitter and the thumb at the right side. 

Now Commence Knitting the First Finger. — Knit 
6; take a needle and cotton and pass it through all 
the stitches of the hand except the 13 last stitches; 
tie the cotton so as to secure the stitches. On a 
third needle cast on 4 stitches; this is for the inside 
of the finger; divide the stitches for the finger 
equally on 3 needles, and continue to knit plain in 
the round for 30 rounds; then decrease by knit- 
ting 2 of the inside stitches together; knit 8 
rounds plain, and decrease by knitting 2 together 
as before. Knit 6 rounds plain, knit 2 together, 
and knit 3 all round until you have 8 stitches re- 
maining on the needle ; draw the wool through the 
8 stitches, draw together, and fasten off the wool 
firmly on the wrong side. 

For the Second Finger. — Put the 7 next stitches 
from the inside of hand on a needle; cast 4 stitches, 
onto another needle and take the last 8 stitches off 
the cotton onto a needle ; now pick up the 4 
cast-on stitches of first finger and work as before, 
making the finger 6 rows longer previous to begin- 
ning the decrease. 

For the Third Finger. — Take seven stitches from 
inside of hand, cast on 4, take the last 7 stitches off 
the cotton, pick the 4 stitches from the inside of the 
second finger; knit as directed for the first finger, 
working 3 rows more before beginning the decrease. 

Fourth Finger. — Take all the stitches remaining 
on the cotton and pick up the 4 stitches from the 
inside of third finger, knit 36 rounds, decrease as 
before described, and finish the same way. 

Now finish the thumb by taking the stitches off the 
cotton onto 
3 needles. 

Work 30 
rounds 
plain; finish 
as directed 
for the fin- 
gers. 

For the 
left -hand 

glove work as directed for the right-hand until you 
have put your stitches for the thumb onto the cotton. 

The thumb must now be at the right-hand side, 
and the back of the glove toward the knitter. 
With this way of holding your work each finger 
must be begun. 




No. 14. — Knitted Glove. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Gentleman's Knitted Driving or Shooting 
Gloves. 

No. 15. — This glove is knitted with brown-mixed 
camel's-hair wool, and is faced with leather on its 
inner surface. Begin the work at the wrist, casting 
on 60 stitches, and knit 
30 rounds in ribbed knit- 
ting, 2 stitches plain and 
2 purled. Next work 46 
rounds in plain knitting, 
but in the 22nd round of 
these, after knitting the 
first 16 stitches, set the 
rest aside for the pres- 
ent, and cast on 16 new 
stitches added to the 
other 16, making 32 
stitches for the thumb; 
knit 42 rounds on these; 
in the 8th round narrow 
1 stitch at both ends of 
the 16 stitches cast on, 
and narrow the same 3 
times thereafter at inter- 
vals of 3 rounds; in the 
last 8 of the 42 rounds 
point the thumb by de- 
creasing gradually. Take 
up 16 stitches out of the 
16 cast on for the thumb; 
these now forming the 
first stitches of the round, 
add them to the stitches 
set aside, and complete 
the remainder of the 46 
rounds for the hand. For 
the forefinger take on 
separate needles the first 9 stitches, cast on 3 new 
stitches, and take the last 9 stitches of the round; 
knit 34 rounds on these, in the last 8 of which 
point the finger. For the middle finger take the 
next 8 stitches of the back and palm, cast on 3 
stitches between, and take 3 stitches out of the 3 
cast on for the forefinger, and on these 22 stitches 
knit 42 rounds, in the last 8 of which point the 
finger. For the third finger take 7 of the remain- 
ing stitches of both back and palm, cast on 3 
between, and take up 3 out of the 3 cast on for the 
middle finger; knit it to the same length as the 
forefinger. For the little finger take the remaining 
stitches of the hand, and. take up 3 from those cast 
on for the third finger; knit 29 rounds, pointing 
the finger in the last 6. These directions are for 
the right glove, and must be reversed for the left; 
they are for gloves of average size; the fingers 
can be lengthened or shortened as needed. 

Knitted Suspenders. 

No. 16. — These suspenders may be made of 
coarse crochet cotton in two colors, or one; or 
they may be made of silk, in which case they may 
be lined with ribbon or silk of the same or a con- 




Xo. 15. — Gentleman's 

Knitted Driving or 

Shooting Glove. 



trasting color. The wide portion must be made 
as long as required, according to the size of the 
individual who is going to wear the suspenders. 

Begin a button-hole end as follows: Cast on 
8 stitches. Then, from the 1st to the 22nd row, 
slip 1 ; * then purl 1 and slip 1 alternately, insert- 
ing the needle for the second slipped stitch as for 
purling; repeat from * across each row, after slip- 
ping the first stitch. In working back the slipped 
stitches are purled and the purled knitted; and 
from the 2nd to the 18th rows, increase by one 
stitch at the beginning of each row. 

To make the button-hole, divide the stitches 
equally, and on each half of the work knit 28 rows 
as above; then knit 6 rows more along all the 
stitches. 

Now cast on 4 stitches at each side of the work 
and begin the wide part as follows: 

First to Eleventh row. — Same as preceding rows. 

Twelfth row. — Four times, alternately, slip 1, 
purl 1, same as in beginning of work; then knit 
16 plain, (in working back purl these 16 plain 
stitches); then 4 times alternately, slip 1, purl 1 
as before. 

Repeat this pattern as often as necessary to 
make the suspenders long enough. Then knit n 
plain rows like the 11 at the other end of the 
pattern. Next cast off 4 stitches at each side, and 
knit a button-hole end to correspond with the one 
at the beginning of the work, except, of course, 
that you nar- 
row instead of 
widen at the 
sloping edges. 

To complete 
the edge, take 
colored cotton 
and crochet as 
follows: * 1 
double, 2 chain 
and 3 trebles 
into the same 
stitch; skip 2 
and repeat 
from * all 
around the 
wide part of 
the work and 
across its ends 
as seen in the 
picture. 

With the 
colored cotton 
darn across the 
center pattern 
of the suspen- 
ders as seen in 
the engraving. 

If preferred, 
a design in cross-stitch might be made down the 
center of the suspender instead of the darning 
illustrated. Or, a design in any color preferred 
could be knitted in after the manner of knitting 
in initials or clocks, as described on page 55. 




Xo. 16. — Knitted Suspender. 



92 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



(0UNTei^pftNe$, $p^eftD$, go^flei^, Doine$, aat^, et(. 



Square for a Counterpane. 

No. i. — This square may be used for other 
purposes than that named, and made of cotton, 
linen or silk, according to the purpose intended by 
the knitter. It is worked in rounds and requires 
5 needles. 

Cast 2 stitches on each of 4 needles. 

First round. — Plain. 

Second round. — *K 1, th o, k 1, and repeat 3 
times more 
from *. 

Third and 
every alternate 
round. — Plain. 

Fourth 
round. — * K 1, 
th o, k 1, th o, 
k 1, and repeat 
3 times more 
from *. 

Sixth round. 
— * K 1, th o, 
k 3, th o, k 1 
and repeat 3 
times more 
from *. 

Eighth 
round. — * K 1, 
th o, k 5, th 
o, k 1, and re- 
peat 3 times 
more from * 

From this 
last round to 
the 1 8th in- 
clusive, knit in 
the same man- 
ner, only in 
every pattern- 
round the 
number of 
stitches be- 
tween the 
made stitches 

increases by 2, so that in the 18th round 15 stitches 
are knitted between the made stitches. 

Twentieth round. — * K 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 5, si 1, 
k 1, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, k 2 together, k 5, 
th o, k 1, th o, k 1 ; repeat 3 times more from *. 

Twenty- second round. — * K 1, th o, k 1, th o, si 1, 
k 1, pass slipped stitch over, th 0, k 4, si 1, k 1, 
pass slipped stitch over, k 1, k 2 together, k 4, th o, 
k 2 together, th o, k 1, th o, k 1; repeat 3 times 
more from *. 

Twenty-fourth roufid. — *K 1, th o, k 1, th o, si 1, 
k 1, pass slipped stitch over, th o, si 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over, th o, k 3, si 1, k 1, pass slipped 




No. 1. — Square for a Counterpane. 



stitch over, k 1, k 2 together, k 3, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 1, th o, k 1 ; re- 
peat 3 times more from *. 

Twenty-sixth round. — *K 1, th o, k 1 ; 3 times 
alternately th o, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over; 
th o, k 2, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over, k t, k 2 
together, k 2 ; 3 times alternately th o, k 2 together; 
th o, k 1, th o, k 1 ; repeat 3 times more from *. 

Twenty-eighth round. — * K 1, th o, k 1 : 4 times 
alternately th o, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over; 

th o, k 1, si 1, k 
1, pass slipped 
stitch over; k 
1, k2 together, 
k 1; 4 times 
alternately th 

0, k 2 together; 
th o, k 1, th o, 
k 1 and repeat 
3 times more 
from *. 

Thirtieth 
round. — * K 1, 
th o, k 1; 6 
times alter- 
nately, th o, si 

1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch 
over; k 1; 6 
times alter- 
nately, k 2 to- 
gether, th o; 
k 1, th o, k 1, 
and repeat 3 
times more 
from *. 

Thirty-se- 
cond round. — 
* K 1, th o, k 
1 ; 6 times al- 
ternately, th o, 
si 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch 
over; th o, k 3 
together; 6 
times alternately th o, k 2 together; th o, k 1, th o, 
k 1, and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Thirty-fourth round. — * K 1, th o, k 1 ; 7 times 
alternately, th o, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over ; 
k 1 ; 7 times alternately, k 2 together, th o; k 1, 
th o, k 1, and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Thirty-sixth round. — * K 1, th o, k 1 ; 7 times al- 
ternately th 0, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over; 
th o, k 3 together ; 7 times alternately th o, k 2 to- 
gether ; th o, k 1, th 0, k 1 ; repeat 3 times more 
from *. 

Thirty-eighth round. — * K 1, th o, k 1 ; 8 times 
alternately, th o, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over; 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



93 



k i ; 8 times alternately, k 2 together, th o ; k 1, 
th o, k 1 ; repeat 3 times more from *. 

Fortieth round. — * K 1, th o, k 1 ; 8 times alter- 
nately, th o, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over ; th o, 
k 3 together ; 8 times alternately, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, th o, k 1, th o, k 1 ; repeat 3 times more 
from *. 

There should now be 41 stitches on each needle. 
Knit 1 round plain and cast off. 

Design for a Counterpane Square. 

No. 2. — Use fine knitting cotton and five steel 
needles. Make in blocks like that seen at No. 2, join 
them and add the border seen at No. 3 on page 95. 

To begin a 
Block. — Cast 2 
stitches each 
on 4 needles. 

First round. 
— Plain. 

Second 
round. — Four 
times alter- 
nately, tho,k2. 

Third round. 
— Four times 
alternately, 
purl 1 and 
knit 2. 

F u r t h 
round. — * Th 
o, p 1, th o, k 
2, and repeat 
3 times more 
from *. 

Fifth round. 
— Alternately 
purl 3 and 
knit 2. 

Sixth round. 
— * Th o, p 3, 
th o, k 2, and 
repeat 3 times 
more from *. 

Seventh 
round. — Four 
times alter- 
nately, p5, k 2. 

Fig h t h 
round. — * Th o, p 2, th o, p 1, th o, p 2, th o, k 2; 
repeat 3 times more from *. 

Ninth round. — Four times alternately, p 9, k 2. 

Tenth round. — * Th o, p 3; 3 times alternately, 
th o, p 1; th o, p 3, th o, k 2 and repeat 3 times 
more from * 

Eleventh round. — Four times alternately p 15, k 2. 

Twelfth round.—* Th o, p 2; twice alternately 

th o, p 1 ; th o, p 7 ; twice alternately th o, p 1 ; 

th o, p 2, th o, k 2, and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Thirteenth round. — Four times alternately, p 23, 

k 2. ' 

Fourteenth round. — * Th o, p 3; 4 times alter- 
nately, th o, p 1; then cast off 8 stitches as follows: 



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^^^fc^^^^^^^^^^g-^Sfffl^g^' - - 






^ : i'':^}::\: : :\y:^0:^V^. 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




"•'■*— -.-a—l-t. ■ -« ~--JS^»fe - — g — riSL 1 



No. 2. — Design foe a Counterpane Square 



Purl 3 together, purl 3 together, ** p 1, take the 
last 2 stitches of the right-hand needle upon the 
left-hand needle, and draw the last stitch over the 
one before; take this stitch again upon the right- 
hand needle, and repeat twice more from **; 
after the last movement of the last repetition, slip 
the stitch before the last one put back on the 
needle over the last one, to draw the little puff 
closely together. Now, 4 times alternately, p 1, 
th o; p 3, th o, k 2, and repeat 3 times more from 
the * at the beginning of the round. 

Fifteenth round. — Four times alternately, p 2 5, k 2. 

Sixteenth round. — * Th o, p 2; twice alternately, 

th o, pi; th o, p 7 ; 3 times alternately, th 0, p 1 ; 

th o, p 7; twice alternately, th o, p 1; th o, p 2, 

th o, k 1 and 
repeat 3 times 
more from *. 
Seventeenth 
round. — Foui* 
times alter- 
nately p 37, 
k 2. 

Eighteenth 
round. — * Th 

0, p 3. ** 4 
times alter- 
nately th o, p 

1, cast off 8 as 
directed in the 
14th round; p 
1, and repeat 
once more 
from **; 3 
times alter- 
nately, th o, p 
1, th o, p 3, 
th o, k 2 and 
repeat 3 times 
more from *. 

Nineteenth 
round. — Four 
times alter- 
nately, p 35, 
k 2. 

Twentieth 

round. — * Th 

o, p 4, ** th 

o, p 7 ; 3 times 

alternately th 

o, pi, and repeat once more from **; th o, 

p 7, th o, p 4, th o, k 2 and repeat 3 times more 

from *. 

Twenty-first round. — Four times alternately p 47, 
k 2. 

Twenty-second round. — * Th o, p 5 ; * * cast off 8 

as before directed, p 1 ; 4 times alternately th o, p 1, 

and repeat once more from * *. Cast off 8 as before, 

p 5, th 0, k 2 and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Twenty-third round. — Four times alternately, 

P 33, k 2. 

Twenty-fourth round. — w Th o, p 8, th o, p 7; 
3 times alternately, th o, p 1, th o, p 7, th o, p 8, 
th o, k 2. 



94 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



k 



Twenty-fifth round. — Four times alternately, p 41, 
k 2. 

Twenty-sixth round. — * Th o, p 9; cast off 8 as 
before, pi; 4 times alternately, th o, p 1, cast off 
8, p 9, th o, k 2 and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Twenty-seventh round. — Four times alternately 

P 3 1 , k 2 - 

Twenty-eighth round. — * Th o, p 12, th 0, p 7, 
th o, p 12, th o, k 2; repeat 3 times more from . 

Twenty-ninth round. — Four times alternately p 35, 
k 2. 

Thirtieth round. — * Th o, p 13, th o, cast off 8 as 
before, p 13, th o, k 2, and repeat 3 times more 
from *. 

Thirty-first round. — * P 13, p 2 together, p 14, 

1 and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Thirty-second round. — Th o, k 28, th o, k 2. 

Thirty-third round. — Plain. 

Thirty-fourth round. — * Th o, k 30, th o, k 2 and 
'repeat 3 times more from * 

Thirty-fifth round. — * K 1, k 2 together; 14 
times alternately, th o, k 2 together; k 3. 

Thirty- sixth round. — * Th o, k 31, th o, k 2; 
repeat from * 3 times more. 

TJnrty-seventh round. — Plain. 

Thirty-eighth ro2ind. — * Th o, k 7,7,, th o, k 2 and 
repeat 3 times more from *. 

Thirty-ninth round. — Four times alternately, p 35, 
k 2. 

Fortieth round. — * Th o, p 35, th o, k 2 and 
peat 3 times more from *. 

Forty-first round. — Four times alternately, 
k 2. 

Forty-second round. — * Th o 
repeat 3 times more from *. 

Forty-third round. — Plain. 

Forty-fourth round. — * Th 
repeat 3 times more from *. 

Foi-ty-fifth round. — * K 2 
th o, k 2 together; k 3 and 
from *. 

Forty-sixth round. — * Th o, 
repeat 3 times more from *. 

Forty-seventh round. — Plain. 

Forty-eighth round. — * Th o 
repeat 3 times more from *. 

Now knit back and forth on the next needle as 
follows: 

Forty-ninth row.- — Narrow 1 as follows: SI 1, 
k or p next stitch, as required by the design; then 
pass the slipped stitch over. P 9, th o, k 1, th o, 
* p 7, th o, k 1, th o and repeat twice more from *; 
p 11. 

Fiftieth row. — Narrow 1 as at beginning of last 
row; k 9, 3 times alternately p 3, k 7; p 3, k 10. 

Fifty- first row. — Narrow 1 as before; p 8, th o, 



—Narrow 1 as before ; 
p 7 ; repeat twice more 



1 as before; 
repeat 3 times 



p 6, 
from 



P 5. 
more 



re- 

P 37, 
k 37, th o, k 2 and 



Fifty-fifth row. 

* th o, k 7, th o 
*; th o, k 7, th o, p «. 

Fifty-sixth row.- — Narrow 1 as before; k 6; 4 
times alternately p 9, k 7. 
Fifty-seventh row. — Narrow 

* th o, k 9, th 0, p 7, and 
from * 

Fifty-eighth row. — Narrow 1 as before; k5, pn; 
3 times alternately, k 7, p n; k 6. 

Fifty-ninth row. — Narrow 1 as before; p 4, k 4; 
narrow 2 stitches as follows: si 1, k 2 together, 
pass slipped stitch over; k 4, * p 3, th o, k 1, th o, 
p 3, k 4, n 2 as before, k 4, and repeat twice more 
from *; p 6. 

Sixtieth row. — Narrow 1 as before, k 4, p 9, 
3> P 3, k 3, p 9, and repeat twice more from 

• k > 
Sixty-first row. — Narrow 1 as before; p 3, k 3, 

narrow 2 as before; k 3, * p 3, th o, k 3, th o, p 3, 

k 3, n 2 as before, k 3 and repeat twice more from 

*; p. 5- 

Sixty-second row. — Narrow 1 as before. K 3, 
P 7, * k 3, P 5> k 3, P 7, an d repeat twice more 
from *; k 4. 

Sixty-third row. — Narrow 1 as before; p 2, k 2, 
n 2 as before, k 2, * p 3, th o, k 5, th o, p 3, k 2, 
n 2 as before, k 2, and repeat twice more from *; 

P4 

Sixty-fourth roiv. — Narrow 1 as before; k 2, p 5, 

* k 3, p 7, k 3, p 5, and repeat twice more from *; 

k 3 -. ' 

Sixty-fifth row. — ;Narrow 1 

* P 3, th o, 
and repeat 



*k 
*. 



n 2 as before, k 1 
n 2 as before, k 1 



as before, p 1, k 
k 7, th o, p 3, k 
twice more from 



o, k 39, tli o, k 2 and Sixty-sixth row. — Narrow 1 as before, k 1, p 3, 



; 19 times alternately 
repeat 3 times more 

d, k 4:, th o, k 2 and 



k 43, th o, k 2 and 



k 3, p 9, k 3, p 3, and repeat twice more from *; 
k 2. 

Sixty-seventh row. — Narrow 1 as before; * n 2 as 
before, p 3, th o, k 9, th o, p 3, and repeat twice 
more from *; n 2 as before, p 2. 

Sixty-eighth row. — Narrow 1 as before; * p 1, 
k 3, p 11, k 3, and repeat twice more from *; p 2. 

Sixty-ninth row. — Narrow 1 as before; p 3, k 4, 
n 2 as before, k 4, * p 3, th o, k 1, th o, p 3, k 4, 
n 2 as before, k 4, and repeat once more from *; 

PS- 

Seventieth row.- — Narrow 1 as before; k 3, p 9, 
* k 3, p 3, k 3, p 9, repeat once more from*; k 4. 

Seventy-first row. — Narrow 1 as before; p 2, k 3, 



n 2 as before, k 3, * p 3, th o, k 3, th o, p 3, 
n 2 as before, k 3, repeat once more from *; 
Seventy- second row. — Narrow 1 as before, k 2 



k3, 
P 4- 
P7, 



P 5> k 3, p 7, k 3, and repeat once more 



th o, 



k 3, th o, repeat twice more 
k 8; 3 



k 3, th o, -" 1 
from *; p 10. 

Fifty-second row. — Narrow 1 as before; 
times alternatelv, p 5, k 7; p 5, k 9. 

Fifty-third row. — Narrow 1 as before; * 
th o, k 5, th o and repeat 3 times more from * 

Fifty-fourth row. — Narrow 1 as before; 4 times 
alternately k 7, p 7, k 8. 



P 7, 
P9- 



k 3 , 

from 

Seventy-third row.- — Narrow 1 as 
k 2, 'n 2 as before, k 2, p 3, th o, 
and repeat once more from *; k 2, 
k 2, p 3. 

Seventy-fourth row. — Narrow r as before, k 1 
P 5> * k 3, p 7, k 3, p 5 ; repeat o ._ :e more from * 
k 2. 

Seventy-fifth row. — N 1 as before, k 1, n 2 as be- 



* 



before; p 

k 5, th o, p 3 

n 2 as before, 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



95 



fore, k i, * p 3, th o, k 7, th o, p 3, k 1, n 2 as be- 
fore, k 1, and repeat once more from * ; p 2. 

Seventy-sixth row. — N 1 as before, p 3, * k 3, 
p 9, k 3, p 3, and repeat once more from * ; k 1. 

Seventy-seventh row. — SI 2, k 2 together, pass 
slipped stitches over, * p 3, th o, k 9, th o, p 3, n 2 
as before, and repeat once more from * ; p 1. 

Seventy-eighth row. — N 1 as before, k 3, p n, 

k 3> P 1, k 3, P IX > k 3, P 1. 

Seventy-ninth row. — N 1 as before, p 2, k 4, n 2 
as before, k 4, p 3, th o, k 1, th o, p 3, k 4, n 2 as 
before, k 4, p 3, k 1. 

Eightieth row. — N 1 as before, k 2, p 9, k 3, p 3, 

k 3, P 9» k 3- 

Eighty-first row. — N 1 as before, p 1, k 3, n 2 as 
before, k 3, p 3, th o, k 3, th o, p 3, th o, k 3, n 2 
as before, k 3, p 3. 
• Eighty-second row. — N 1 as before, k 1, p 7, k 3, 

P 5. k 3, P 7, k 2. 

Eighty-third row. — N 1 as before, k 2 ; n 2 as 
before, k 2, p 3, th o, k 5, th o, p 3, k 2, n 2 as 
before, k 2, p 2. 

Eighty- fourth row. 
— N 1 as before, p 

5, k 3, P 7, k 3, P 5. 
k 1. 

Eighty-fifth row. 
— N 1 as before, n 
2 as before, k 1, p 3, 
th o, k 7, th o, p 3, 
k r, n 2 as before, 
k 1, p 1. 

Eighty-sixth row. 
— N 1 as before, p 
2, k 3, p 9 , k 3 , p 3. 

Eighty -seventh 
row. — SI 2, k 2 to- 
gether, pass slipped 
stitches over, p 2, th 
o, k 9, th o, p 3, n 2 
as before. 

Eighty-e ig h t h 
row. — N 1 as before, 
k 2, p 11, k 3. 

Eighty-ninth row- 
before, k 4, p 3. 

Ninetieth row. — N 1 as before, k 1, p 9, k 2. 

Ninety-first row. — N 1 as before, k 3, n 2 as be- 
fore, k 3, p 2. 

Ninety-second row. — N 1 as before, p 7, k 1. 

Ninety-third row. — N 1 as before, k 1, n 2 as be- 
fore, k 2, p 1. 

Ninety-fourth row. — N 1 as before, p 3, k 1. 

Ninety-fifth row. — N 1 as before, k 3. 

Ninety-sixth row. — Cast off the stitches. 

This completes one corner of the block. Repeat 
the details from the 48th row, on each ne#dle, for 
the remaining corners. 

Border for Counterpane. 

No. 3. — Cast on 25 stitches. 

First row. — SI 1, k 2, th o, k 2 together (these 
first 5 stitches are worked off the same in every 




No. 3. — Border for Counterpane (See Design at No. 2) 



N 1 as before, p 1, k 4, n 2 as 



following uneven row, therefore they will not be 
again given in these rows ; but the knitter must 
not forget that they are to be knitted as just 
directed). K 3, th o, k 1, th o, k 5, th o, k 2 to- 
gether crossed, k 1 ; then th o, k 2 together crossed 
3 times in succession ; k 2 together. 

Second row. — Th o, k 10, th o, k 2 together, k 3, 
p 3, k 5, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Third row. — Twice alternately, k 3, th o ; k 5, 
th o, k 2 together crossed, k 2 ; 3 times alternately 
th o, k 2 together crossed ; k 1. (The last 7 
stitches of each uneven row, up to the 29th row 
are knit in the same way, and will not be men- 
tioned again in these rows ; but the knitter must 
be careful to knit them as just directed.) 

Fourth row. — Th o, k 11, th o, k 2 together, k 3, 
p 5, k 5, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Fifth row. — K 3 ; twice alternately th o, k 5 ; 
th o, k 2 together crossed, k 3. 

Sixth row. — Th o, k 12, th o, k 2 together, k 3, 
p 7, k 5, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Seventh row. — K 
3, th o, k 7, th o, k 
5, th o, k 2 together 
crossed, k 4. 

Eighth row. — Th 
o, k 13, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 3, p 9, k 5, 
th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Ninth row. — K 3, 
th o, k 9, th o, k 5, 
th o, k 2 together 
crossed ; k 5. 

Tenth row. — Th 
o, k 14, th o, k 2 
together, k 3, p n, 
k 5, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1. 

Eleventh row. — K 
7, n, k 9, th o, k 2 
together crossed, k6. 
Twelfth r o w. — 
. Th o, k 15, th o, k 2 

together, k 3, p 9, k 5, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Thirteenth row. — K 6, n, k 8, th o, k 2 together 
crossed, k 7. 

Fourteenth row. — Th o, k 16, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3> P 7, k 5> tk o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Fifteenth row. — K 5, n, k 7, th o, k 2 together 
crossed, k 8. 

Sixteenth row. — Th o, k 17, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3> P 5; k 5) th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Seventeenth row. — K 4, n, k 6, th o, k 2 together 
crossed, k 9. 

Eighteenth row. — Th o, k 18, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3» P 3> k 5> th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Nineteenth row. — K 3, n, k 5, th o, k 2 together 
crossed, k 6, th o, p 1, th o, k 3. 

Twentieth row. — Th o, k 21, th o, k 2 together, 
k 3, p 1, k 5, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Twenty-first row. — (For the stripe at the upper 
edge of the lace, repeat the stitches from the first 
to the twentieth row. A description of the point 



96 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



now follows.) — K 6 ; 3 times alternately, th o, p 1, 
th o, k 4. 

Twenty-secoJid row. — Th o, k 26. 

Twenty-third row. — K 4, th o, p 1, th o, k 1, th o, 
p 7, th o, k 1, th o, p 1, th o, k 3. 

Twenty-fourth row. — Th o, k t,^. 

Twenty-fifth row. — K 4; 3 times alternately, th o, 
pi; th o, k 1 ; cast off 8 as directed for the puffs 
in the square ; k 1, 3 times alternately, th o, p 1, 
th o, k 4. 

Twenty-sixth row. — Th o, k 34. 

Twenty-seventh row. — K 2, * th o, p 1, th o, k 1, 
th o, p 7, th o, k 1 and repeat once more from *; 
th o, p 1, th o, k 3. 

Twenty-eighth row. — Th o, k 45. 

Twenty-ninth row. — K 2, * 3 times alternately 
th o, p 1 ; th o, k 1, cast off 8 as before, k 1, and 
repeat once more from * ; 3 times alternately th 0, 
p 1 ; th o, k 4. 

Thirtieth row. — K 42. 

Thirty-first row. — K 2, * th o, p 7, th o, k 1, th o, 
k 1. Repeat once more from * ; th o, p 7, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 2 ; 3 times alternately, k 2 
together, th o ; k 2 together twice. (The last 10 
stitches of every uneven row up to the 57th row 
are knitted the same as the last 10 stitches just 
given. They will not be mentioned again in these 
rows ; but the knitter must be careful to knit them 
according to the instructions just given.) 

Thirty-second row. — Th o, k 51. 

Thirty-third row. — K 2, * cast off 8 as before ; 
k 1 ; 3 times alternately th o, p 1 ; th o, k 1, and 
repeat once more from * ; cast off 8 as before, k 1. 

Thirty-fourth row. — Th o, k 34. 

Thirty-fifth row. — K 4, th o, p 7, th o, k 1, th o, 
p 1, th o, k 1, th o, p 7, th o, k 2. 

Thirty-sixth rmu. — Th o, k 39. 

Thi?-ty-scventh row. — K 4 ; cast off 8 as before, 
k 1 ; 3 times alternately th o, p 1 ; th o, k 1 ; cast 
off 8 as before, k 1. 

Thirty-eighth row. — Th o, k 26. 

Thirty-ninth row. — K 6, th o, p 7, th o, k 2. 

Fortieth row. — Th o, k 27. 

Forty-first row. — K 6 ; cast off 8 as before, k 1. 

Forty-second row. — Th o, k 18. 

Forty third row. — K 7. 

Forty-fourth row. — Th o, k 17. 

Forty-fifth row. — K 6. 

Forty-sixth row. — Th o, k 16. 

Forty-seventh row. — K 5. 

Forty-eighth row. — Th o, k 15. 

Forty -ninth row. — K 4. 

Fiftieth row. — Th o, k 14. 

Fifty -first row. — K 3. 

Fifty-second row. — Th o, k 13. 

Fifty-third row. — K 2. 

Fifty-fourth row. — Th o, k 12. 

Fifty- fifth row. — K 1. 

Fifty-sixth row. — Th o, k n. 

Fifty-seventh rozo. — In the last 10 stitches k 2 
together ; then 3 times alternately, th o, k 2 to- 
gether crossed ; k 2 together. 

Fifty-eighth row. — Th o, k 10. 

Fifty-ninth row. — K 1 ; 3 times alternately th o, 



k 2 together ; k 2 together crossed. 
Sixtieth row. — Th o, k 10. 
Repeat from the first row for all the work. 



Knitted Doily. 

(For Illustration tee nest Page.) 

This doily may be made of thread or 



Use 4 needles of a size suit- 
On 3 of them cast 1 stitch 



No. 4 
fine crochet cotton, 
able for the thread 
each. 

First round. — Knit plain, increasing 1 on each 
needle, by knitting a second stitch out of the back 
of each stitch. 

Second rozmd. — Knit and increase in the same 
manner, thus making 4 stitches on each needle. 

Third round. — K 1, mi, lc2, mi, ki and re- 
peat for each of the other needles. 

Fourth and every folloiving alternate round. — 
Plain. 

Fifth round.— K 1, m 1, k 3, m 1, k 2 and repeat. 

Seventh round. — K 1, m 1, k 4, m 1, k 3 and re- 
peat. 

Ninth round. — K 1, m 1, k 5, mi, k 4 and re- 
peat. 

Eleventh round. — K 1, m 1, k 1, m 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 3, m 1, k 1, m 1, k 2 together, k 2 and 
repeat. 

Thirteenth round. — K r, m 1, k 3, m 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2, m 1, k 3, m 1, k 2 together, k 1 and 
repeat. 

Fifteenth round. — K 1, mi, k 5, mi, k2 to- 
gether, k 1, m 1, k 5, m 1, k 2 together and repeat. 

Sixteenth round. — Plain, as before directed. 

(After knitting this round, all except the last 
stitch, pass this stitch onto the next needle, and 
also pass the last stitch of each of the other two 
needles onto the ones next it, before beginning the 
seventeenth round.) 

Seventeenth round. — N, m 1, k 7, m 1, k 2 to- 
gether, m 1, k 7, m 1 and repeat. Be careful to 
make 1 at the end of the 3rd needle. In knitting 
around plain, knit the made stitch on the needle 
with 19 stitches, thus making 20 stitches on each 
needle, and replacing the stitch that was moved in 
the 1 6th row on its original needle. 

Nineteenth round. — K 1, mi, ki, mi, k2 to- 
gether, k 7, m 1, k 1, m 1, k 2 together, k 6 and 
repeat. 

Twenty-first round. — K 1, m 1, k 3, mi, k 2 to- 
gether, k 6, m 1, k 3, m 1, k 2 together, k 5 and 
repeat. 

Twenty-third round. — K 1, m 1, k 2 together, k 1, 
m 1, k 2, m 1, k 2 together, k 5, mi, k 2 together, 
k 1, m 1, k 2, m 1, k 2 together, k 4 and repeat. 

Twetity-fifth round. — K 1, m i, k 2, m 1, k 2 to- 
gether, m 1, k 2 together, k 1, m 1, k 2 together, 
k 4, m 1, k 2, m 1, k 2 together, m 1, k 2 together, 
k 1, m 1, k 2 together, k 3 and repeat. 

Twenty-seventh round. — K 1, mi, k4, mi, k2 
together, k 3, m 1, k 2 together, k 3, m 1, k 4, m 1, 
k 2 together, k 3, m 1, k 2 together, k 2 and repeat. 

Twenty-ninth round. — K 1, m 1, k 3, m i, k 2 to- 
gether, k 3, mi, k 2 together, k 1, mi, k 2 to- 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



97 



gether, k 2, m 1, k 3, m 1, k 2 together, k 3, mi, 
k 2 together, k 1, m 1, k 2 together, k 1 and repeat. 

Thirty-first round. — K 1, m 1, k 3, 111 1, k 2 to- 
gether, m 1, k 2 together, k 1, m 1, k 2 together, 
m 1, k 2 together, k 1, m 1, k 2 together, k 1, m 1, 
k 3, m 1, k 2 together, m 1, k 2 together, k 1, m 1, 
k 2 together, m 1, k 2 together, k 1, m 1, k 2 to- 
gether and repeat. 

Thirty-third round. — K i,mi, k5, mi, k 2 to- 
gether, k 3, m 1, k 2 together, k 3, m 1, k 2 to- 
gether, m 1, k 5, m 1, k 2 together, k 3, mi, k 2 
together, k 3, m 1, k 1 and repeat. 

Thirty-fifth round. — Pass the first stitch on each 
needle off onto the needle behind. * M 1, k 16, 
m 1, k 2 together, m 1, k 17, m 1, k 2 together and 
repeat from *. Knit the 36th round plain, as 
directed, and cast 
off. 

Round Mat In 
Brioche. 

(No Illustration.) 

Use a pair of 
bone needles No. 9 
or 10, and blue and 
white double Ber- 
lin wool. 

Cast on with 
white wool 26 
stitches. 

First row. — Knit 
8, * th o, slip 1, 
knit 1 (slip the 
stitch as if for purl- 
ing), repeat from * 
to the end of the 
row. 

Second row. — Th 

0, slip 1 as for purl- 
ing, knit 2 together 
to form a rib; re- 
peat from * 8 times 
more. Take the 
next stitch on the 
needle to knit it, 
but before doing so, 
pass the wool over 

the right-hand needle only, and over the first two 
fingers of the left hand; do this three times, then 
take off the stitch as if you were knitting it. Now 
put the point of the left needle into the stitch 
made by the loops, and knit the stitch again. 
Repeat this on the next 7 stitches. 

Third row. — Slip 1, knit 7 plain, then th o, slip 

1, knit 2 together 8 times; leave the last 3 on the 
needle; turn. 

Fourth row. — Knit 8 ribs, then repeat the loops 
in the second row. 

Fifth row. — Eight plain, knit 7 ribs; turn. 
Sixth row. — Knit 7 ribs, knit 8 loops of wool. 
Seventh row. — Knit 8, knit 7 ribs; turn. 
Eighth row. — Knit 6 ribs, knit 8 loops. 
Ninth row. — Knit 8, knit 5 ribs; turn. 
7 




Tenth row. — Knit 5 ribs, knit 8 loops. 

Eleventh row. — Knit 8, knit 4 ribs; turn. 

Twelfth row. — Knit 4 ribs, knit 8 loops. 

Thirteenth row. — Knit 8 plain, knit 3 ribs; turn. 

Fourteenth row. — Knit 3 ribs, knit 8 loops. 

Fifteenth row. — Knit 8, knit 2 ribs; turn. 

Sixteenth row. — Knit 2 ribs, knit 8 loops. 

Seventeenth row. — Knit 8, knit 1 rib, turn, knit 1 
rib, knit 8 loops. 

Eighteenth row. — Knit 8, then knit each of the 
ribs on the left needle successively, until all nine 
are knitted; join the colored wool without severing 
the white, and repeat from the 2nd row. The 
piece knitted forms one-sixteenth of the whole. 
You will require 8 white and 8 colored sections. 
Join the sides of the sections and gently draw 

the center together. 



Square for a 
Counterpane. 

(For Illustration see next 
Page.) 

No. 5. — Begin 
with the raised pat- 
tern. Cast on 3 
stitches, using Dex- 
t e r ' s cotton, and 
steel needles of suit- 
able size for the 
cotton chosen. 

First row. — Knit 
plain. 

Second row. — Slip 
1, make 1 by knit- 
ting the horizontal 
thread which lies 
under the next loop; 
(all of the widen- 
ings at the begin- 
ning and end of 
each alternate row 
are made in this 
manner); k 1, make 
1, k 1. 

Third row. — SI 
1, and knit plain to 
end of row. 

Fourth row. — SI 1, m 1, k 1; th o, k 1, th o (this 
begins the raised pattern), k 1, m 1, k 1. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 2, p 3, k 3. 

Sixth row. — SI i,m i,lc2, tho, k3, tho, k 2,m i,k 1. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, k 3, p 5, k 4. 

Eighth row. — SI 1, mi, k 3, th o, k 5, th o, k 3, 
m 1, k 1. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, k 4, p 7, k 5. 

Tenth row. — SI 1, m 1, k 15, m 1, k 1. 

Eleventh row. — SI 1, k 5, p 7, k 6. 

Twelfth row. — SI 1, m 1, k 5, k 2 together at the 
back, k 3, k 2 together, k 5, m 1, k 1. 

Thirteenth row. — SI 1, k 6, p 5, k 7. 

Fourteenth row. — SI 1, mi, k 6, k 2 together at 
the back, k 1, k 2 together, k 6, m 1, k 1. 

Fifteenth row. — SI 1, k 7, p 3, k 8. 



No. 4. — Knitted Doily. 
(For Directions see this and preceding Page.) 



98 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Sixteenth row. — SI i, m i, k 7, k 3 together, k 7, 
m 1, k 1. 

Seventeenth row. — SI 1, knit to end of row. 

Eighteenth row. — SI 1, mi, k 3, th o, k 1, th o, 
k 9, th 0, k 1, th o, k 3, m 1, k 1. 

Nineteenth row. — SI 1, k 4, p 3, k 9, p 3, k 5. 

Twentieth row. — SI 1, mi, k 4, th o, k 3, th o, 
k 9, th o, k 3, th 0, k 4, m 1, k 1. 

Tioenty-first row. — SI 1, k 5, p 5, k 9, p 5, k 6. 

Twenty-second row. — SI 1, m 1, k 5, th o, k 5, 
th o, k 9, th o, k 5, th o, k 5, m 1, k 1. 

Twenty-third row. — SI 1, k 6, p 7, k 9, p 7, k 7. 

Twenty-fourth row. — SI 1, m 1, k 35, in 1, k 1. 

Twenty -fifth row. — SI 1, k 7, p 7, k 9, p 7, k 7. 

Twenty-sixth rota. — SI 1, m 1, k 7, k 2 together 
at the back, k 3, k 2 together, k 9, k 2 together at 
the back, k 3, k 2 together, k 7, m 1, k 1. 

Twenty-seventh row. — SI 1, k8, p S, k 9, p 5,k 9. 

Twenty-eighth row. — 
SI 1, m 1, k 8, k 2 to- 
gether, k 1, k 2 togeth- 
er, k 9, k 2 together, k 
i, 1(2 together, k 8, m 
1, k 1. 

Twenty-ninth row. — 
SI 1, k 9, p 3, k 9, p 3, 
k 10. 

Thirtieth row. — SI 1, 
m 1, k 9, k 3 together, 
k 9, k 3 together, k 9, 
m 1, k 1. 

Thirty-first row. — SI 
1, m 1, k 5, th o, k 1, 
th o, k 9, th o, k 1, th 
o, k 9, th o, k 1, th o, 
k 5, rn 1, k 1. 

Thirty-second row. — 
SI 1, k 6, p 3, k 9, p 3, 

k 9^P.3, k 7. 

Thirty-third row. — 
SI 1, m 1, k 6, th o, k 
3, th o, k 9, th o, k 3, 
th o, k 9, th o, k 3, th 
o, k 6, m 1, k 1. 

Thirty-fourth row. 
— SI 1, k 7, p 5, k 9, p 5, k 

Thirty-fifth row. — SI 1, m 1, k 7, 

9, th o, k 5, th o, k 9, th o, k 5, 




Fourth roiv. — SI 1, p 2 together, *th o, p 2 to- 
gether, and repeat from *, purling 3 together at the 
end. 

Fifth row. — Purl. 

Sixth row. — Knit. 

Seventh row. — Purl. 

Eighth row. — Knit. 

Ninth row. — Purl. 

Tenth row. — Purl. 

Now repeat from the first row until the square is 
complete. In knitting the last stitch of each row, 
pass the needle from front to back instead of in 
the usual way. 

Border for a Counterpane or Spread. 

(For Illustration see next Page.; 

No. 6. — Cotton No. 8 and rather large steel 

needles are generally 
selected in making this 
border for the pur- 
poses above named, 
but Saxony yarn will 
also be found very ef- 
fective tor the design. 
The puff-edge and the 
heading are crocheted 
on. 

Cast on 12 stitches. 

First row. — SI i,ki, 

th o twice, k 3 together, 

th o twice, narrow at 

back of work, k 3, th 

0, n. 
Second row. — SI 1 , k 

6, p 1, k 2, p 1, k 2. 
Third row. — SI 1, k 

1, th o twice, n, k 1, 
narrow at the back, th 
o twice, narrow at the 
back, k 2, th o, n. 

Fourth row.— SI 1. k 



No. 5.— Square for a Counterpane. 
(For Directions see this and preceding Page.) 



k 

k 



9, P 5, 
th o, k 5, 
th o, k 7, 



k 

th 

m 



Thirty-sixth rovu. — SI 1, k 8, p 7, k 9, p 7, k 9, 
p 7, k 9. 

Thirty- seventh row. — SI 1, m 1, k 55, m 1, lc 1. 

Thirty-eighth row. — SI 1, k 9, then knit like nth 
row, knitting 9 between the puffs,and 10 at the end. 

Thirty-ninth row. — SI 1, m 1, k 9 ; then knit like 
12th row and so on for the other half of the puff. 
Work 4th row of puffs to correspond. 

Now begin the other half of the square,- having 
finished the puffs, by slipping the first stitch and 
narrowing once at the beginning of each row. 

First row. — Knit. 

Second row. — Purl. 

Third row. — Knit. 

Now make the holes as follows : 



5, p 1, k 4, p 1, n at 
the back. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, k 
1, th o twice, n, k 1, th o, k 1, n at the back, th o 
twice, n at the back, k 1, th o, n. 

Sixth row. — SI 1, k 4, p 1, k 6, p 1, k 2. 

Seve?ith row. — SI 1, k 1, th o twice, n, k 5, n, 
th o twice, narrow at the back, th o, n. 

Eighth row. — SI 1, k 3, p 1, k 8, p 1, k 2. 

Ninth row.—^\ 1, k 4, n, th o. 
To make the puff in the center of each diamond, 
work as follows : Draw 1 loop of the cotton 
through the hole in the middle of the 5th row, 
with the right needle; pass it onto the left needle 
and knit it off. Repeat this 4 times more; k 1, 
and then slip the 5 loops over the last stitch knit; 
then th o, n, k 4, th o, n. 

Tenth row. — SI 1, k 3, n at the back, k 10. 

Eleventh row. — SI 1, n, th o twice, n, k 1, n at 
the back, th o, k 2, n at the back, th o twice, k 1, 
th o, n. 

Ttvelfth row. — SI 1, k 3, p 1, k 8, p 1, n at the back. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Thirtee?ith row. — SI i, n, th o twice, n, k 3, n at 
the back, th o twice, n, k 1, th o, n. 

Fourteenth row. — SI 1, k 4, p 1, k 6, p 1, n at the 
back. 

Fifteenth row. — SI 1, n, th o twice, n at 
the back, k 1, n, th o twice, n, k 2, th o, n. 

Sixteenth row. — SI 1, k 5, p 1, k 1, n at 
the back, k 1, p 1, n at the back. 

Seventeenth row. — SI 1, n, th o twice, n, 
th o twice, n, k 3, th o, n. 

Eighteenth row. — SI 1, k 6, p 1, k 2, p 1, 
n at the back. 

JVineteenth row. — SI 1, k 9, th o, n. 

Twentieth rmv. — SI 1, k 11. 

Repeat from first row for all the diamonds. 

For the Puff-Edging: First row. — Each 
puff is crocheted as follows: * Th o, pick 
up a loop at the point seen in the picture; re- 
peat from * 3 times more, then th o, 
draw through all the loops, th o, draw 
through the last stitch. Make chains of 
5 stitches between all the puffs except 
the 2 at the angles. Here no chain at all 
is made. 

Complete the edge as seen in the picture 
with 5-chains and single crochets. 

For the Heading: First and Third rows. 
— Double crochets with 2-chains between. 

Second row. — Cross trebles, with 2-chains 
between. 

To make a cross treble work as follows: Fasten 
the thread and make a chain of 4. * Throw the yarn 



throw it over again and take up the third chain 
stitch beyond the one first taken up. Five stitches 
will now be on the hook. Put the yarn over and 





No. 7.— Design for Counterpanes, Afghans, Etc. 

over the hook twice, take up the first stitch under- 
neath; there will now be 4 stitches on the hook; 
throw the yarn over and draw through 2 stitches; 



No. 6. — Border for a Counterpane or Spread. 
(For Description see this and preceding Page.) 

draw through 2 of them, over again and through 
2 more, over again and through 2 more, over 
again and through the last 2. Now make 
one chain, and a double crochet in the 
junction of the cross. Make 2-chain, skip 
2, and repeat from *. 

Design for Counterpanes, Afghans, 
Etc. 

No. 7. — In making a counterpane, af- 
ghan, robe, etc., etc., by this design, knit 
tv/o sections like the engraving and join 
them along the diagonal edge to form one 
block. Make as many blocks as desired 
and unite them in square or oblong shape, 
as preferred. Finish with a border of 
fringe or knitted lace. Select needles 
according to the size of the cotton or 
wool used. Two or more colors may be 
united in making a spread or afghan by 
this design. 

Cast on 35 stitches. 

First, Third and Fifth rows. — Plain 
knitting. 

Second and Fourth rows. — Purl, purling 2 
together at each end of the row. 

Sixth, Eighth and Tenth rows. — Plain, 
knitting 2 together at each end of the 
row. 

Seventh and Ninth rows. — Purl. 
Eleventh row. — Plain. Then begin at the second 
row and repeat until you have only 3 stitches left. 
Cast off. 



100 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Grandmother's Table Mat. 
No. 8. — This is a neat, serviceable mat which 




No. 8. — Grandmother's Table Mat. 



recommends itself as being easily laundered, and 
furnishing pleasant employment for the dear aged 
fingers which are no longer able to handle intricate 
patterns, yet dislike to be idle. 

It is knitted lengthwise of the points in plain 
back-and-forth knitting, and is sewed together at 
the first and last points made. 

Use Dexter's cotton No. io. Cast on 44 stitches. 
Knit 14, turn, knit back to last stitch; cast off this 
stitch; knit back to 1st turn, and knit 3 more 
stitches, turn; knit back to last stitch. Cast off as 
before; knit back to 2nd turn, and knit 3 more 
stitches, turn, and work in this manner until the 
last 3 stitches are knitted. This will complete 1 
point. Now you have 33 stitches on the needle. 
Knit back, cast on ri stitches for the next point, and 
repeat as for 1st point. Nineteen points form the 
mat. Sew together as described and press smoothly. 

Section of Carriage Spread in Knitting, 
with Crocheted Border. 

No. 9. — This spread, a section of which is here 
illustrated, is made of red and white cotton, and is 



knitted in squares on a foundation of 134 stitches. 
It is 11 squares in length and 11 in breadth, and 
10 stitches are used for each square which is 14 
rows deep; 2 stitches are 
used in separating the 
squares across the work, and 
2 are also at each side edge; 
2 rows of purling are also at 
the top and bottom of the 
spread, and separate the 
squares between these two- 
edges, so that each square 
practically has a narrow bor- 
der of purled stitches. 

The designs at the centers 
of the squares are made by 
purling stitches, and as the 
engraving very clearly rep- 
resents which ones are purl- 
ed, special directions are 
not needed. Care must be 
taken in working back and 
forth to knit and purl the 
divisions so that the stitches 
will assume the effect seen 
in the picture. This is done 
by knitting the purled stitch- 
es of the preceding row in 
going forward, and purling 
the knitted ones. 

To begin, purl 2 rows and 
then divide the work into 
squares by purling 2 and 
knitting 10 alternately across. 
Purl the last 2. When the 
main portion is completed, 
work all around its edges as 



follows: 1 
row single 
crochets; 3 
rows double 
crochets as 
seen in the 
picture, the 
middle row 
being red ; 
then make 
the p i c o t 
edge of the 
red with 2 
single cro- 
chets alter- 
nating with 
chains of 5 
stitches 
each. Un- 
bleached, 
ecru ordrab 
cotton may 

be used for this rug in place of white, with blue 
instead of red as the intermingling color. 




No. 9. — Section of Carriage Spread in 
Knitting, with Crocheted Border. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



101 



Counterpane Design with Border. 

No. 10. — This design may be worked out in 
Dexter's or any suitable cotton with two, long, No. 
14 knitting needles. It is made in squares that are 
worked diagonally across. 

Cast on 1 stitch. 

First row. — Th o, k 1. 

Second roiu. — Th o, k 2. 

Third row. — Th o, k 1 , th o, k 1 , th o, k 1 . 

Fourth row. — Th o, k 1, p 3, k 2. 

Fifth row. — Th o, p 2, th o, k 3, th o, p 2. 

Sixth row. — Th o, k 2, p 5, k 3. 

Seventh row. — Th o, p 3, th o, k 1, si 1, k 2 to- 
gether, pass slip- 
ped stitch over, 
k 1, th o, p 3. 

Repeat the 
6th and 7th 
rows, alternate- 
ly, 5 times more, 
continuing to 
increase 1 stitch 
at the beginning 
of every row, 
which will make 

1 stitch more to 
purl before and 
after the raised 
pattern in each 
row. 

Eighte enth 
row. — Th o, k 

8, p 5, k 9. 
Nineteenth 

roiv. — Th o, p 

9, k 1, si 1, k 

2 together, pass 
slipped stitch 
over, k 1, p 9. 

Twentieth 
row. — Th o, k 

9, p 3, k 10. 
Twenty - first 

row. — Th o, p 

10, k 3 togeth- 
er, p 10. 

Twenty-second row. 
Twenty-third row- 
Twenty-fourfh row. 



-Th o, p 3, * tho, k 3, th o, p 5 
7 times more; purl to end of 




No. 10. — Counterpane Design with Boeder. 



-Th o; pu:i to end of row. 
Th o, knit to end of row. 
— Th o; purl to end of row. 
Twenty-fifth and Twenty zsixth rows. — Th o; k to 
end of row. 

Twenty-seventh row. — Th o; purl to end of row. 

Twenty-eighth and Thirtieth rows. — Th o; k to 
end of row. 

Twenty -ninth row. — Th o; purl to end of row. 

Thirty-first row. — Th o, * p 1, si 1 as if for purl- 
ing; keep the cotton in front of the needle and re- 
peat from * to the end of the row. 

Thirty-second row. — Th o; p to end of row. Re- 
peat the last 2 rows 5 times more. 

Forty-third and Forty-sixth rows. — Th o, k to end 
of row. 

Forty-fourth, Forty-fiftJi, Forty-seventh, Forty- 



eighth and Fiftieth rows. — Th o ; p to end of row. 

Forty-ninth row. — Th o; knit to end of row. 

Fifty-first row. — Th o, p 2, * th o, k 1, th o, p 5, 
and repeat from * 7 times more; then p to end of 
row. 

Fifty-second row. — Th o, k 2, * p 3, k 5, and re- 
peat from * 7 times more; then knit 3. 

Fifty-third row- 
and repeat from * 
row. 

Fifty-fourth row. — Th o, k 7, * p 5, k 5, and re- 
peat from * 7 times more; k 4. 

Fifty-fifth row. — Th o, p 4, * th o, k 1, si 1, k 2 
together, pass slipped stitch over, k i 3 th o, p 5, 

and repeat from 

* 7 times more; 
purl to end of 
row. 

Fifty-sixth 
row. — Th o, k 8, 

* P 5, k ":5; re- 
peat from * 7 
times more; k5. 

Repeat last 2 
rows, alternate- 
ly, 5 times more, 
always increas- 
ing by making 
1 stitch at the 
beginning o f 
every row. 

Sixty - seventh 
row.— Th o, p 9, 

* k 1, si 1, k 2 
together, pass 
slipped stitch 
over, k 1, p 5. 
Repeat from * 
7 times more; p 
to end of row. 

Sixty-eighth 
row. — Th o, k 
15, * P 3, ^5, 
and repeat from 

* 7 times more; 
knit to end of 
row. 

Sixty-ninth row. — Th o, p 10, *.sl 1, k 2 together 
pass slipped stitch over, p 5, and repeat from * 7 
times more; purl to end of row. 

Repeat from the 22nd to the 69th rows inclusive, 
being very careful to make the regular increase, so 
as to have 16 raised patterns at the repetition 
of the 51st row. In the 60th row, begin to 
decrease for the 2nd half of the square by knit- 
ting 2 together. Join the squares by an over- 
and-over stitch or crochet them together with slip 
stitches. 

Design for Border of Counterpane 
Seen at No. 10. 

(For Illustration see nest Page.) 

No. 11. — Cast on 32 stitches. 



102 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



First row. — Knit 2, th o, k 2 together, knit to 
end of row. 

Second row. — P 29, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Third row. — Like 1st row. 

Fourth row. — Like 2nd row. 

Fifth row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, p 4, *, th o, 
k 1, th o, p 5, and repeat 3 times more from *. 

Sixth row. — K 5, * p 3, k 5, and repeat from * 
3 times more; th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Seventh row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, p 4, * th o, 
k 3, th o, p 5, and repeat from * 3 times more. 

Eighth row. — K 5, * p 5, k 5, and repeat from * 
3 times more; th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Ninth row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, p 4, * th o, 
k 1, si 1, k 2 together, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, 
th o, p 5, and repeat from * 3 times more. 

Tenth rout. — K 5, * p 5, k 5, and repeat from * 
3 times more; th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Repeat the 9th and 10th rows, alternately, 5 
times more. 

Twenty-first row. 
— K 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, p 4, * k 1, si 
1, k 2 together, pass 
slipped stitch over, 
k 1, p 5, and repeat 
from * 3 times more. 

Twenty -second 
row.—K 5, * p 3, k 
5, and repeat from 

* 3 times more; th 
o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Tnjenty-third row. 
— K 2, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, p 4, si 1, k 
2 together, pass slip- 
ped stitch over, p 5, 
and repeat from * 3 
times more. 

Tw enty -foicrth 
row. — K 5, * p 1, k 
5, and repeat from 

* 3 times more; th 
o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Tw e n ty -fifth 
row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, k to end of row. 

Twenty-sixth row. — P 29, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Twenty-seventh and Twetity-ninth rows. — K 2 
th o, k 2 together, p to end of row. 

Twenty-eighth row. — K 29, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Thirtieth and Thirty-second rows. — Like the 26th. 

Thirty-first rmv. — Like 25th row. 

Thirty-third row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, * p 1, 
si 1 as if for purling; keep the cotton in front of the 
needle, and repeat from * to end of row. 

Thirty-fourth row. — Purl 29, th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Thirty-fifth row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, * si 1 
as for purling, p 1; keep the cotton in front of the 
needle and repeat from * to end of row. 

Thirty-sixth row. — P 29, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 
Repeat these last 4 rows twice more. 

Forty-fifth row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, k to 
end of row. 




No. 11. — Design foe Border op 
(For Directions see this 



Forty-sixth row. — P 29, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 
Forty-seventh row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, p 28. 
Forty-eighth row.- K 29, th o, k 2 together, k 1. 
Forty-?iinth row. — Like 47th row. 
Fiftieth and Fifty-second rows. — Like 46th. 
Fifty-first row. — Like 45th row. Repeat from 
the 5th row for the required length. 

For the Lace on the Border. — Cast on 7 
stitches. 

First row. — SI 1, k 4, th o, k 2 together. 
Second row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 
together, k 1. 

Third row. — SI 1, k 1; k 1 and p 1 in the made 
stitches, k 2, th o, k 2 together. 

Fourth row. — K 2, th o, k 2 together, k 4. 
Fifth row. — SI 1, k 5, th o, k 2 together. 
Sixth row. — K 2, th o, k 2, together, th o, k 1, 
th o, k 2 together, k 1. 

Seventh row.— SI 1, k 1; k 1 and p 1 out of the 

made stitch; k 1; 
k 1 and p 1 out of 
the made stitch; k 
2, th o, k 2 together. 
Eighth row. — K 
2, th o, k 2 together, 
k 7 . 

JSlinth row. — SI 
1, k 8, th o, k 2 
together. 

Tenth row. — K 2, 
th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 2 together, 
k 1. 

Eleventh row. — 
SI 1, k 1 ; k 1 and p 
1 out of the made 
stitch; k 1; k 1 and 
p 1 out of the made 
stitch; k 1; k 1 and 
purl one out of the 
made stitch; k 2, th 
o, k 2 together. 
Twelfth row. — K 



Counterpane Seen at No. 
and preceding Page.) 



10. 



th 0, k 2 together, k 10. 
Thirteenth row. — Cast off 



8. k 



th 



o, 



2 to- 



gether. Repeat all these details for each point. 
Knitted Harlequin Quilt. 

(No Illustration.) 

A harlequin quilt is made of remnants of colored 
Germantown wool, with a pound of black to 
qualify the brilliant effect. Two bone needles, 
No. 5 or 6, are needed. It is knit in diamonds, 
in garter stitch, commencing with 1 stitch and 
widening at the beginning of every row by 1 stitch. 
Widen until you have 20 stitches on your needle. 
Then narrow by knitting 2 together at the beginning 
of every row until you have only 1 left. Then 
change the color. 

Alternate black or dark brown diamonds with the 
gay-colored ones. Sew the diamonds together with a 
rug needle, and finish the quilt with a crocheted edge. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



103 



Knitted Doily. 

No. 12. — This doily may be made of crochet 
cotton, thiead or silk. 




No. 12. — Knitted Doily. 



Use five needles. Cast 2 stitches on each of 4 
needles. 

First round. — Knit plain. 

Second round. — Make 1, k 1, and repeat to end 
of round. 

Third round. — Make 1, k 2, and repeat to end of 
round. 

Fourth round. — Make 1, k 3, and repeat to end 
of round. 

Fifth round. — Make 1, k 4, and repeat to end of 
round. 

Sixth round. — Make 1, k 5, and repeat to end of 
round. 

Seventh round. — Make 1, k 4, k 2 together and 
repeat to end of round. 

Eighth round. — Make 1, k 6 and repeat. 

Ninth round.- — Make 1, k 5, k 2 together and 
repeat. 

Tenth round. — Make 1, k 7, and repeat. 

Eleventh round. — Make 1, k 6, k 2 together and 
repeat. 

Twelfth round. — Make i, k 8 and repeat. 

Thirteenth round. — Make 1, k 7, k 2 together 
and repeat. 

Fourteenth round. — Make 1, k 9 and repeat. 

Fifteenth round. — Make 1, k 1, make 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 5, k 2 together and repeat. 

Sixteenth round. — Make 1, k 3, make 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 5, make 1, k 3, make 1, k 2 together, k 5, 
and repeat. 

SeventeentJi round. — Make 1, k 5, make 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2, k 2 together, make 1, k 5, make 1, k 2 
together, k 2, k 2 together, and repeat. 

Eighteenth round. — Make 1, k 5, make 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2, k 2 together, make 1, k 5, make 1, k 2 
together, k 2, k 2 together, and repeat. 



Nineteenth round. — Make 1, k 7, make 1, k 2 to- 
gether, k 2, make 1, k 7, make 1, k 2 together, k 2 
and repeat. 

Twentieth round. — Make 1, k 9, make 1, k 2 to- 
gether, make 1, k 2 together, make 1, k 9, make 1, 
k 2 together, and repeat. 

Twenty-first round. — Knit plain and then cast off. 

Design for a Counterpane. 

No. 13. — This design may be made in blocks of 
any size convenient to the knitter; or if the coun- 
terpane is for a child's crib Or bed, it might be 
made in one piece upon very long needles. It may 
be made of knitting cotton or Saxony yarn, or of 
any similar materials. In casting on, use any number 
of stitches divisible by 10, with 9 over. This will 
bring the beginning of every leaf in every 10th 
stitch, with 9- stitches at each side edge of the 
block. After casting on the desired number of 
stitches knit across plain. 

First, Third and Fifth rows. — Knit 9, purl 1, and 
repeat across the row, ending with knit 9. 

Second and Fourth rows. — Plain. 

Sixth row- — * Knit to the purled stitch; take up 
or knit 1 stitch out of the right side of the purled 
stitch; knit the purled stitch and then take up 
another stitch out of the left side of the purled 
stitch which you have just knitted. Repeat from * 
across the work. 

Seventh row. — Knit 9, purl 3 and repeat across 
the row. 

Eighth row. — Knit 8, k 2 together, * take up a 




No. 13. — Design foe a Counterpane. 

stitch out of the bar between the last stitch knit 
and the first one on the left-hand needle; k 1 
(center stitch of leaf) take up another stitch as 
before, k 2 together, k 7, and repeat from * across 
the row. 



104 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Ninth row. — Knit to leaf, * p 5, k 7, and repeat 
from * across the row. 

Tenth row. — K 7, * k 2 together, k 1; make 1 



Twenty-third row. — Begin the second row of 
leaves, making them the same as those in the first 
•row, and arranging them as seen in the picture. 




No. 14. — Design for Counterpanes, Spreads, Robes, Etc. 

stitch at each side of the center stitch, knitting the 
latter as in the eighth row; k 1, k 2 together, k 5, 
and repeat from * across the row. 

Eleventh row. — Knit to leaf, purl 7, and repeat 
across the row. 

Twelfth row. — K 6, k 2 together, k 2, * make 1 
at each side of the center stitch, knitting the latter, 
as before; k to center of next leaf and repeat from 

* across the row, knitting the last half of the last 
leaf to correspond with the first half. 

Thirteenth row. — K to leaf, p 9 and repeat across 
the row. 

Fourteenth row. — K to leaf; narrow first 2 and 
last 2 stitches of every leaf, knitting the inter- 
vening stitches plain. 

Fifteenth row. — K to leaf, purl leaf stitches and 
k rest plain. 

Sixteenth row. — Plain. 

Seventeenth row. — Knit to leaf, purl leaf stitches 
and repeat across the row. 

Eighteenth row. — K 6, make r by taking up a 
stitch out of the oblique cross-thread of the stitch 
just knitted; * k 2 together, k 3, k 2 together, k 1, 
make 1 as before, k 3, make 1, k 1, and repeat from 

* across the row, making 1 stitch in knitting be- 
tween the last leaf and the edge, so as to make 
75 stitches. 

Nineteenth row. — Knit to leaf, purl leaf and re- 
peat across the row. 

Twentieth row. — Same as 18th row except that 
you knit 7 instead of 6 in beginning, and k 1 be- 
tween the narrowings instead of 3; and between 
the leaves k 5 instead of 3. 

Twenty -first row. — Like 19th. 

Twenty-second row. — K 8, * k 2 together, k 10, 
and repeat from * across the row, ending with k 9. 



Design for Counterpanes, Spreads, 
Robes, etc. 

No. 14. — Cast on as many stitches as are 
necessary, making the number divisible by 18. 
First row. — K 4, th o, k 2 together, th o, 
k 2 together, k 4, p 6, and repeat from begin- 
ning of row. 

Second and every following alternate row. — 
Purl all the knitted and made stitches, and 
knit the purled ones. 

Third row. — K 6, th o, k 2 together, th o, 
k 2 together, k 6, p 2, and repeat from * across 
the row. 

Fifth row. — P 4, * k 4, th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 2 together, k 4, p 6, and repeat from *; 
but in repeating, purl 2 instead of 6, in each 
repetition. 

Seventh row. — K 2, * p 2, k 6, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, th o, k 2 together, k 6; repeat from *, 
but at the end of each repetition, k 4 instead 
of 6. 

Ninth row. — K 2, * p 6, k 4, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, th o, k 2 together, k 4, and repeat from 
*; but at the end of each repetition, k 2 instead of 4. 
Eleventh row. — * K 6, p 2, k 6, th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 2 together, and repeat from *. 

Thirteenth rmv. — Th 0, k 2 together, * k 4, p 6, 
k 4, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 together and repeat 
from *. 

Fifteenth row. — * Th o, k 2 together, th o, 




No. 15. — Design for Counterpane. 
(For Description see next Page.) 



k 2 together, k 6, p 2, k 6, and repeat from *. 
Work in this manner, according to the illustra- 
tion, until the work is of the desired dimensions. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



10c 




t-. „ pass slipped stitch over, k ?., k 2 together, k 1 and 

Design for Counterpane. repeat from *. 

(For illustration see preceding Page.) Second, Fourth, Sixth, Eighth, Tenth and Twelfth 

No. 15. — Use Dexter's cotton, worsted, or any rows. — Purl. 

Third row. — K 2, * th o, k 3, th o, k 1, si 1, k 1, 
pass slipped stitch over, k 1, k 2 together, k 1 and 
repeat from *. 

Fifth row. — K 2, * th o, k 5, th o, k 1, s\ 1, k 2 
together, pass slipped stitch over, k 1 and repeat 
from *. 

Seventh row. — * SI 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch 
over, k 3, k 2 together, k 1, th o, k 1, th o, k 1; 
repeat from * ending with k 2. 

Ninth row. — * SI 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over, 
k 1, k 2 together, k 1, th o, k 3, th o, k 1, and 
repeat from *, ending with k 2. 

Eleventh row. — * SI 1, k 2 together, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 1, th o, k 5, th o, k 1, and repeat 
from *, ending with k 2. 

Repeat from the first row for next division of 
the work. 

Knitted Counterpane Border. 

No. 17. — This border must be made in sections 
as long as can be conveniently knitted, and then 
sewed together. Each scollop requires 21 stitches, 
and the leaf above requires 9 ; but the scollops 
No. 16.— Design for a Counterpane Stripe. and leaves are so arranged that in casting on you 

must use any number of stitches divisible by 63. 
thread or yarn suitable for the purpose, and steel Begin at the lower edge, 
needles. First row. — * Purl 3, k 3, k 2 together; m 1 (or 

19 stitches are required to work out two blocks 
(1 open, i solid). Cast on as many stitches as will 
be required to make the work of the desired dimen- 
sions, always using a number divisible by 19. Purl 
back. 

First row. — * K 2 together, th o and repeat 3 
times more from * ; k 1 1 and repeat from beginning 
of the row, across the work. 

Second row. — P n, k 8, and repeat across the 
work. 

Repeat these two rows 10 times more. Then 
reverse the order of the blocks by knitting as fol- 
lows: 

K 11, * th o, k 2 together and repeat 3 times more 
from *; then repeat from the beginning of the row. 
Next row. — K 8, p 1 1 and repeat across the work. 
Make the blocks the same as the previous ones; 
then reverse again by repeating the first two rows 
of the work. The stars at the center of the solid 
square are embroidered by chain stitches. 

Design for a Counterpane Stripe. 

No. 16. — Cotton or wool may be used for this 
design as required by the purpose for which it is 
selected. 

Cast on 10 stitches for each section or division 
of the design, with 2 additional stitches to keep 
the. design even. If a plain edge is desired 5 or 6 
stitches must be allowed at each side and knitted 
plain at the beginning and end of each row. 

First row. — Iv 2 * th o, k 1, th o, ki, d 1. k 1, 




No. 17. — Knitted CouNTtRPANE Border. 

th o) and k 1, 8 times; k 2 together at the back, 
k 3 and repeat from *. 

Second row. — P 2, p 2 together at the back, p 16, 
p 2 together, p 2, k 3 and repeat. 



106 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Third row. — P 3, k 1, k 2 together, k 16, k 2 
together at the back, k 1 and repeat. 

Fourth row. — P 2 together at the back, p 16, 
p 2 together, k 3 and repeat. 

Repeat these 4 rows 5 times more. Knit the 
next 2 rows plain; purl the next and knit the next. 

First row of tlie Leaf Pattern. — M 1, k 1, m 1, 
p 8 and repeat from the beginning of the row. 

Second raiv. — K 8, p 3, k 8 and repeat. 

Third row. — K 1, m 1, k 1, mi, k 1, p 8 and 
repeat. 

Fourth row. — K 8, p 5 and repeat. 



k 1, m 1, k 



2 . P 



Fifth row. — K 2, m 1, 
and repeat. 

Sixth 
row. — K 8, 
p 7 and re- 
peat. 

Seventh 
row. — K 3, 
m 1, k 1, m 
1, k 3, p 8 
and repeat. 

F ig hth 
row. — K 8, 
p 9 and re- 
peat. 

N i 11 t h 
row. — K 2 
together at 
the back, k 
5, k 2 to- 
gether, p 8 
and repeat. 

Tenth 
row. — K 8, 
p 7 and 
repeat. 

Fleventh 
row. — K 2 
together at 
the back, k 
3, k 2 to- 
gether, p 8 
and repeat. 

Twelfth 
row. — K 8, 
p 5 and re- 
peat. 

T h i r - 
teenth row. 

— K 2 together at the back, k 1, k 2 together, p 
8 and repeat. 

Fourteenth row. — K 8, p 3 and repeat. 

Fifteenth row. — SI 1, k 2 together, pass slipped 
stitch over, p 8 and repeat. 

Sixteenth row. — Plain. 

Seventeenth and Eighteenth rows. — Purl. 

Nineteenth row. — M 1, k 2 together at the back 
and repeat throughout the row. 

Twentieth row. — Purl. 

Twenty -first row. — K 1, * m 1, k 2 together 
at the back; repeat from *, ending the row with 
knit 1. 



Twenty-second roiv. — Purl. 
Twenty-third row. — Like 19th row. 
Twenty-fourth row. — Purl. 
Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth rows. — Plain. 
Twenty-seventh roiv. — Purl. 

Twenty-eighth row. — Knit. Then cast off the 
stitches. 

Finish the lower edge as follows: 
First row. — 1 single crochet in each stitch. 
Second row. — 1 single at the point of the scollop, 
1 double into first single, skip 2 stitches, 
into next, and repeat from * for each 



* 4 chain 
1 single 
scollop. 




No. 18.— Knitted Cover for a Piano Stool or a Small Table. 



Knitted 

Cover for 

a Piano 

Stool or 

a Small 

Table. 

No. 18. 
— This 
cover may 
be made of 
heavy knit- 
ting silk or 
cotton, and 
requires 5 
coarse knit- 
tin g nee- 
dies in mak- 
ing. 

Cast on 
each of 4 
needles, 1 
stitch. 

First 
Found. — 4 
times alter- 
nately, th o, 
k 1. 

Sec o n d 
round and 
every alter- 
nate round 
to Twefity- 
first. — Knit 
plain. 

T h i r d 
roun d . — * 
times more from *. 
and repeat from * for 



round (increasing 1 



Th o, k 1 and repeat 7 

Fifth round. — * Th o, k 2, 
the round. 

Repeat the last (pattern] 
stitch in each round) and the plain ones alternately, 
until the twelfth (plain) round is reached, when 
there will be 7 plain stitches between every 2 put- 
overs in the preceding round. 

Thirteenth round. — * Th o, k 2 together, k 4, k 2 
together and repeat from *. 

Fifteenth round. — Th o, k 1, th o, k 2 together, 
k 2, k 2 together, and repeat from * 

Seventeenth round. — * Th o, k 3, th o, k 2 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



107 



together, k 2 together and repeat from *. 

Nineteenth round. — * Th o, k 5, th o, k 2 together, 
and repeat from *. 

Twenty-first round. — * K 1, th o, k 5, th o, k 2 
and repeat from *. 

Twenty-second round. — K 2, k 2 together, k 1, k 2 
together, k 3 and repeat from *. 

Twenty-third round. — * K 2, th o, k 3, th o, k 3, 
and repeat from *. 

Twenty-fourth round. — * K 3, k 2 together, k 5 
and repeat from *. 

Twenty-fifth round. — * K 3, th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 4; repeat from *. 

Twenty-sixth round. — Plain. 

Twenty-seventh round. — * Th o, kc>, th o, k 1, and 
repeat from *. 

Twenty-eighth, Thii-tieth and Thirty-second rounds. 
—Plain. 

Tiuenty-ninth round. — * K 1, th o, k 9, th o, k 2 
and repeat from *. 

Thirty-first round. — * K 2, th o, k 9, th o, k 3 and 
repeat from *. 

Thirty-third round. — * K 3, th o, k 9, th o, k 4, 
and repeat from *. 

Thirty-fourth round. — * K 4, k 2 together, k 5, 
k 2 together, k 5, and repeat from *. 

Thirty-fifth round. — * K 4, th o, k 7, th o, k 5, 
and repeat from *. 

Thirty-sixth round. — * K 5, k 2 together, k 3, 
k 2 together, k 6, and repeat from *. 

Thirty-seventh round. — * Th o and k 5 3 times 
in succession; th o, k 1, and repeat from *. 

Thirty-eighth round. — * K 7, k 2 together, k 1, 
k 2 together, k 8 and repeat from * 

Thirty-ninth round. — * K 1, th o, k 6, th o, k 3, 
th o, k 6, th o, k 2, and repeat from *. 

Fortieth round. — * K 9, v : : ■••■'■ 

;peat from *. 

Forty-first round. — * K 

. j *. r * 



1 o, k 6, th o, k 2, and repeat from *. 

Fortieth roimd. — * K 9, k 3 together, k 10, and 
repeat from *. 

Forty- first round. — * K 2, th o, k 15, th o, k 3 
and repeat from *. 

Forty-second 1 ound. — * K 3, k 2 together, k n, 
k 2 together, k 4, and repeat from *. 

Forty-third round. — * K 3, th o, k 13, th o, k 4 
and repeat from *. 

Forty-fourth round. — * K 4, k 2 together, k 9, 
k 2 together, k 5 and repeat from *. 

Forty -fifth round. — * K 4, th o, k n, th o, k 5, 
and repeat from *. 

Forty-sixth round. — * K 5, k 2 together, k 7, 
k 2 together, k 6 and repeat from *. 

Forty-seventh round. — * Th o, k 5, th o, k 9, th o, 
k 5, th o, k 1 and repeat from *. 

Forty-eighth round. — * K 7, k 2 together, k 5, k 2 
together, k 8, and repeat from *. 

Forty-ninth round. — * K 1, th o, k 6, th o, k 7, 

th o, k 6, th o, k 2 and repeat from * 

Fiftieth round. — * K 2, k 2 tog 
.■\ i- _ 1- _ ^ i-i i, _ i. 



cpcitL lIUlll 

Fiftieth round. — w K 2, k 2 together, k 5, k 2 
together, k 3, k 2 together, k 5, k 2 together, k 3 
and repeat from *. 

Fifty-first round. — * K 



ana repeat irom . 

Fifty-first round. — * K 2, th o, k 6, th o, k 5, 
th o, k 6, th o, k 3 and repeat from *. 

Fifty-second round. — * K 3, k 2 together, k 5, 
k 2 together, k 1, k 2 together, k 5, k 2 together, k 4 
and repeat from *. 



k 2 together, th o, 
k 2 together, th o, 
th o, 



2. 



k 2 



k 2 



Fifty-third round. — * K 3, th o, k 6, th o, k 3, 
th o, k 6, th o, k 4 and repeat from *. 

Fifty -fourth roimd. — * K n, k 3 together, k 12 
and repeat from *. 

Fifty -fifth round. — * K 4, th o, k 15, th o, k 5 and 
repeat from *. 

Fifty-sixth round. — * K 5, k 2 together, k n, k 2 
together, k 6, and repeat from *. 

Work in this manner until the cover is as large as 
desired. Then cut it between the points and turn 
under to form the latter. 

For the Lace Edge. — Cast on 5 stitches. 

First row. — SI 1, th o, k 2 together, th o, 

Second row. — SI 1, knit the rest. 

Repeat 2nd row after every pattern row. 

Third row. — SI 1, th o, k 2 together, th o, 
together, th o, k 1. 

Fifth row. — SI 1, th o, 
together, th o, k 2. 

Seventh row. — SI 1, th o 
together, th 0, k 2 together, th o, k 1. 

Ninth row. — SI 1, th o, k 2 together, 
together, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2. 

Eleventh row. — SI 1, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 
together, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 1 . 

Thirteenth row. — SI i,th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 
together, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 2. 

Fifteenth row. — Cast off 8 stitches, th o, k 2 
together, th o, k 1. 

Sixteenth row. — Plain. Then begin again at 
the first row. 

Knitted Bath-Blankets for Infants. 

Bath blankets for babies are pretty when made 
after the following simple plan. Heavy zephyr is 
used, and somewhat large hard-wood or bone 
needles. 120 stitches will make a good width for the 
blanket. Knit it a square and a-quarter in length in 
plain back and forth knitting. It may be bordered 
with colors, although nothing except red will bear the 
washing required to keep the bath-blanket clean. 

Knitted Cradle-Blankets. 
Cradle-blankets are knit of single zephyr on 
smaller needles than are used for bath-blankets. 
140 stitches are cast on at the beginning. The 
blanket maybe prettily striped with "baby-blue " 
and white, with pink and white, or scarlet and white. 
A wide band of color at the ends and plain white 
between, looks well. Bind the ends with ribbon or 
galloon, or edge with knitted worsted lace. 

Knitted Afghan for Baby-Carriage or Crib. 

Knit plain or fancy strips, wide or narrow, of 
harmoniously contrasting zephyr, or Germantown 
worsted, until each is the whole length required. 
Then crochet them together with colored worsted 
to match the principal hue used, or with one that 
offers a vivid contrast. Crochet a loop-chain at 
each end, and knot lengths of worsted into the 
loops as a fringe. 

If you prefer, knit squares, instead of strips, and 
join neatly with crocheted slip stitches. 



108 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



^UG$. 



Knitted Rug. 

Nos. i, 2, 3 and 4. — Use the thick heavy yarn 
that is sold for making rugs and is called Smyrna 



1 shows the rug completed, and No. 4 the back 
of the work, while No. 2 shows the method of 
knitting in the wool after the latter has been cut in 
the lengths desired. These lengths must depend on 




No. 1. — Knitted Rug. 



wool, for the 
pattern, and 
any heavy cot- 
ton or linen 
yarn for the 
foundation. 
The design for 
the rug, with 
the colors re- 
quired, is given 
at No. 3, and 
each tinyblock 
represents a 
strand of the 
wool of the 
color desig- 
nated, so that 
the design may 
be very easily 
followed. No. 




No. 2. — Detail for Knitted Rug. 



individual 

taste, accord- 
ing to the re- 
quired thick- 
ness of the rug. 
Cast on 
enough stitch- 
es to make the 
rug as wide as 
desired. The 
wool is knit in 
with every 
other stitch of 
the founda- 
tion-work as 
follows : Knit 
1 stitch; lay in 
a strand of 
four or five 
lengths of the 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



109 



wool, with one-half to the front and the other half 
to the back ; knit i, then bring the wool from the 
back to the front with the ends even, and knit i ; 



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Description of Symbols: ■ Dark Brown ; H Liglit Brown ; o DarV 
Bine; "Lig'utBluej HMaroou; E Dark Green; Q Orange. 

No. 3. — Design for Knitted Rug seen at No. 1. 
(For Description see preceding Page.) 



produced. It is edged with a six-inch-wide border 

of maroon furniture-plush or of velveteen, which 

rests in notches on the knitted center. The rug is 

lined with stout linen crash. 

Begin each strip by casting on 20 
stitches, and knit to and fro in plain 
knitting; it will take about 42 rows to 
make a square, but this will depend on 
the quality of the work; the knitting 
must be quite tightly done. The strips 
are of different lengths, containing a 
varying number of squares. 

For the first strip (see the left-hand 
upper corner of the illustration) work 
only a square of the darkest red. 

Second strip. — A square of dark red, a 
square of medium red, a square of dark 
red. The square composing the 1st 
strip is joined in the middle square of 
the 2nd strip; up to the 8th the strips 
are so joined that they are one block or 
square longer at each end than the pre- 
ceding one. 

Third strip. — 1 square of dark red, 1 
of medium red, 1 of light red, 1 of me- 
dium red, 1 of dark red. 

Fourth strip. — 1 dark red, 1 medium 
red, 1 light red, 1 ecru, 1 light red, 1 
medium, 1 dark. In all the strips to the 
1 8th inclusive, the first 3 and the last 3 
squares are dark, medium and light red; 
this being understood, in the following 
directions only the middle squares will 
be mentioned. 

Fifth strip. — 3 ecru. 

Sixth strip. — 5 ecru. 

Seventh strip. — 3 ecru, 2 light red, 2 
ecru. 

Eighth strip. — 3 ecru, 1 light red, 3 
medium red, 2 ecru. 

Ninth strip. — 2 ecru, 1 light red, 1 
medium red, 3 dark red, 2 ecru. 

Tenth strip. — 2 ecru, 1 medium red, 
1 dark red, 3 medium red, 2 ecru. 



lay in another strand and repeat the details given 
for all the work, being careful to follow the colors 
of the designs as indicated by the symbols. 

The rug may have a lining if preferred, al- 
though it is not necessary. Rugs of this descrip- 
tion are often made from the ravelings of Brus- 
sels carpeting, or from strips of silk or woollen 
goods cut like ordinary carpet rags but in shorter 
lengths. 

Knitted Rug. 

(For Biustration see next Page.) 

No. 5. — This engraving illustrates a knitted 
bedroom rug, which is 56 inches long by 34 wide, 
and is worked with six-thread woolen yarn in 
three shades of red and one of the beige or natural 
ecru shade. It is composed of 21 strips, set 
together so that an effect of shaded squares is 




No. 4.— Back of Knitted Rug. 
(For Description see preceding Page.) 



Eleventh strip. — 2 ecru, 1 dark red, 1 
red, 1 light red, 1 medium, 1 dark, 2 £cru. 



medium 



110 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Twelfth strip. — 2 ecru, 3 medium red, 1 dark 
red, 1 medium, 2 ecru. 

Thirteenth strip. — 2 ecru, 3 dark red, 1 medium, 
1 light, 2 ecru. 




No. 5. — Knitted Rug. 
(For Description see this and preceding Page.) 



Fourteenth strip. — 2 ecru, 3 medium red, 1 light, 
3 ecru. 

Fifteenth strip. — 2 ecru, -2 light red, 3 ecru. 

The subsequent strips are each a block shorter 
than the one preceding. 

Sixteenth to the Twenty- 
first strips. — Like the 6th to 
the 1 st. 

The strips are over-seamed 
together from the wrong side. 

Felt Rug, With Knitted 
Center. 

No. 6. — For the founda- 
tion of the rug use felt of 
any color desired, and pink 
or embroider the edges. Use 
double Germantown wool or 
any heavy yarn preferred, 
for the center. 

Use two bone or wooden 
knitting needles and on one 
cast as many stitches as will 
be needed to make the cen- 
ter as wide, proportionately, as the one seen in the 
engraving. Knit across twice, plain. 

Now, for the third (or first tufted) row, knit the 



first stitch; * then wind the wool around the first 
finger of the left hand (or two fingers if the tufts 
are desired quite long) from four to six times, 
according to the desired size of the tufts and the 
texture of the yarn. Now slip the right- 
hand needle through the next stitch and 
the wind-overs, throw the yarn over the 
needle and draw it through the wind-overs 
and stitch; keeping the wind-overs still on 
the fingers, slip the stitch mentioned off 
from the left-hand needle; knit the next 
stitch and slip the wind- overs off. Re- 
peat from * across the row, and knit back 
plain. Repeat these two rows until the 
center is as long as desired. If the rows of 
tufts appear too close together, make three 
rows of plain knitting between the rows. 
By the exercise of a little ingenuity 
this nig may be very economically made. 
Underneath the center ordinary muslin 
may be used, and strips of felt may be at- 
tached to this foundation in border style, 
as the tufted center will extend beyond 
the joining and conceal it. Line the rug 
with cambric, Silesia or any appropriate 
fabric, and thus conceal the border join- 
ings on the wrong side. Flannel or rem- 
nants of ladies' cloth or broadcloth left 
over from dresses or other garments of 
these fabrics may be used in place of the 
felt strips. If preferred the whole rug 
may be knitted, and then bordered with 
fringe or a handsome crocheted edging. 

Knitted Rugs. 

Pretty rugs are made by cutting silk, cot- 
ton or wool odds-and-ends into fine strips like carpet- 
rags and sewing them together in the same manner. 
Then with heavy bone or wooden needles knit back 
and forth, in strips of different colors, sewing the 




No. 6. —Felt Rug, with Knitted Center. 



strips together to form the rugs. A border of black, 
knit by the plan seen at No. 2 on page 108, will 
greatly improve the appearance of such a rug. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Ill 



jugful fuvn(Le<; fop^ chilD^gn^ Wgai^. 



Child's Cap. 

No. i. — Full directions for making this 
may be tound on page 66, where it is shown 




JSTo. 1. — Child's Cap. 



Eighth to Twelfth rows. — Same as from 2nd to 
6th rows, 
cap Continue the details given until there are thirty- 

and two holes, one directly over the other, and then set 
the stitches for the ribs, as follows : 

K 2, p 2, k 2, p 2 across the needle. Knit in 
this manner until there are 45 ribbed rows ; then 
knit once across plain, and purl once across. 

To make the Holes for the Ribbon. — K 4, * th o, 
n, k 3, and repeat from * across the row. 

Knit back plain, and then knit 6 times across as 
follows : P 1 row, k 1 row, alternately to the end 
of the 6 rows, and bind off. This completes one- 
half of the shirt. Make the other half to corre- 
spond. 

For the Sleeves. — Cast on 68 stitches, and work 
the same as for the lower part of the shirt until the 
strip is 3 holes deep. Then knit across plain and 
purl back, until there are 5 rows ; but in the third 
row, after knitting 17 stitches, make holes the same 
as in the top of the shirt, for the ribbon. Then 
bind off and sew the ends of the sleeves together. 

Sew the two halves of the shirt together to within 
an inch and a-half of the top, and then sew in the 
sleeves. Now crochet a shell-scollop about the 
neck, making 6 double crochets for each shell, and 
catching the latter down by a single crochet. Edge 
these scollops with single crochets of silk. 

Finish the sleeves with similar scollops, and, if 



described as an evening hood for a lady. It is 
therefore unnecessary to repeat the instructions 
here. For children the cap is usually made of 
white, or of some bright color such as blue or red. 
It is a dainty affair in white and may be made of 
silk and wool. 

Infants' Knitted Shirt. 

No. 2. — This little garment is made of Saxony 
yarn and silk, and is knitted in two sections that 
are afterward sewed together. 

Tor One-Half of the Shirt. — Cast on 78 stitches 
for the lower edge. 

First row.— K 2, *th o, k 1, th o, k 3 ; narrow 
twice, k 2, th o, k 1, th o, k 3, narrow twice, k 2, 
and repeat from * across the work. 

Second row. — Purl across the work. 

Third row. — N, k 1, * th o, k 1, th o, k 3, n 
twice, k 2, and repeat from * across the work. 

Fourth row. — Narrow once and knit the rest 
plain, to reverse the pattern. 

Fifth row. — P 2 together, p 1, * th o, p 1, th o, 
p 3, p 2 together twice (to narrow twice), p 2, and 
repeat from *. 

Sixth row. — Narrow once and knit the rest plain, 
to reverse the pattern. 

Seventh row. — N, k 1, and then repeat first row 
from first * for rest of row. 




No. 2. — Infants' Knitted Shirt. 

desired, edge them with silk to correspond with the 
neck. 

Run No. r ribbon in the holes as seen in the en- 
graving, and tie it in a bow at the front. 



112 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Child's Chest Protector. 

No. 3 — This comfortable little article may be 
made of any fine worsted, such as single zephyr or 
Germantown wool, with Angora wool for the outer 




No. 3. — Child's Chest Protector. 

edge, and of any tint desired, though white is prefer- 
able as it may be renovated without losing any of 
its beauty. The tabs meet at the back of the neck 
where they may be fastened with a fancy pin. 

In knitting this protector, it is advisable to first 
cut out a stiff paper pattern having the same general 
outlines as the engraving, but of a size suitable for 
the child who is to wear the protector. 

The protector illustrated is for a child 
five years of age, and its dimensions are as 
follows : 

A cross the lower edge of the front, 5 inches. 

From neck to lower edge, 7^ inches. 

From neck to point of tab, 7 inches. 

Width at widest portion, ...13 inches. 

From tab to tab at neck edge,,.. 2% inches. 

By cutting a pattern by these measure- 
ments the proper shape may be obtained, 
and then a pattern larger or smaller, as re- 
quired may be cut from it. 

To begin the Protector. — Cast on 30 stitches and 
knit back and forth plain until there are 7 rows. 
(Once across and back forms one row). 

To make the first row of Blocks. — After finishing 
the first row, turn and knit as follows : Knit 10, purl 
5, knit 5, purl 5, knit 5. (In knitting the rows, 5 



stitches must be knit plain at each side of every 
row, in order to form the border seen in the engrav- 
ing.) Turn. 

Knit 10, p 5, k s, p 5, k 5. Turn. 

K 10, p 5, k 5, p 5, k 5. Turn. 

Knit back and forth in this order until there are 
6 rows, each formed by knitting across and back. 
This completes the first set of blocks. 

To begin the second set of Blocks. — (These blocks 
must alternate with those of the first set). 

Knit 5; then widen by knitting a stitch out of 
the next stitch, but do not slip it off the needle; 
then purl out of this same stitch and slip it off; 
purl 4, k 5, p 5, k 5, now purl 1 out of the next 
stitch, but do not slip it off the needle, to widen, 
and then knit 5. Turn. 

K 7 but do not slip off the last stitch; p 5, k 5, 
p 5, k 7 but do not slip the last stitch off the 
needle; p 1, k"5. Turn. 

Complete this set of blocks after this manner, 
widening as described at each side between the 
blocks and border. Then make a set of blocks to 
correspond with the first set, widening as in the 
second set, and so on until the widest part of the 
protector is reached. 

To make the Tabs. — When the neck edge is 
reached (in the protector illustrated) pass all the 
stitches of the border at one side and those of 6 
blocks onto another needle; then bind off the 
stitches of 4 blocks for the neck-edge. Now con- 
tinue the knitting after the manner before directed, 
to form the tab at one side, making the plain bor- 
der at each side of the tab and narrowing at the 
outer border, instead of widening as before. Com- 
plete the other tab to correspond. 

For the outer Edge. — Use Angora wool and cro- 
chet shells along the border as follows: 1 single 
crochet and 2 doubles all in the same space, select- 
ing the spaces so that the shells will be perfectly 
flat. Fasten ties of ribbon at the sides as seen in 
the engraving, to tie the protector about the waist. 

Infant's Knitted Long Mittens. 
No. 4. — This mitten is particularly easy to make, 




No. 4. — Infants' Knitted Long Mitten. 

being knitted on two needles, and sewed up after 
it is knitted. Use four-thread Saxony yarn. 

Cast on 48 stitches carefully for the upper edge 
of the mitten. 

Work in patent knitting for 3 inches in depth. 
(Patent knitting is formed by this method : Throw 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



113 



wool forward, slip i, knit 2 together.) About 32 
rows of this knitting will be required. 

Thirty-third row. — Knit. 

Thirty-fourth row. — Purl. 

Thirty-fifth row. — Knit. 

Thirty -sixth row. — Knit 1 and purl 1 alternately 
across the row. 

Thirty-seventh row. — Knit. 

Thirty-eighth row. — Purl. 

Thirty-ninth row. — Like 36th. row. 

Fortieth row. — Purl. 

Forty -first row. — Knit. 

Forty-second to Seventy-second rows. — Patent knit- 
ting. 

Seventy-third row. — K 1, p 1, repeat to end of row. 

Seventy-fourth row. — 
P 1, k 1, repeat to end 
of row. 

The seventy- third 
and seventy -fourth 
rows are repeated al- 
ternately 6 times more. 

Work in patent knit- 
ting for 32 rows. 

Take a third needle, 
and work on 33 stitches 
from the right-hand 
side of the mitten 
(leave 15 on the other 
needle without work- 
ing for the present); 
continue to work in 
patent knitting for 32 
rows on the 33 stitches 
now on the right side 
of the work; this is ap- 
parent in the engrav- 
ing by the narrow 
stripe at the top of the 
-mitten that was knitted 
next to the first 2 inch- 
es of patent knitting ; 
knit a row, knitting 2 
stitches together each 
time. 

In the following 3 
rows, k 1, p i, and the 
one you knit in one 
row you purl in the 

next. Now draw the wool through all the stitches 
on the needle, pull it tight and fasten off. 

On the 15 stitches of the thumb, work in patent 
knitting 28 rows ; repeat the last three rows of the 
hand at the top of thumb ; sew up the thumb and 
the side of the mitten, and it is finished. 

Reverse the side on which the thumb is worked 
for the second mitten ; in all other respects the 
work is the same. If desired two colors may be 
used for the mittens. 

Child's Knitted Hood. 

No. 5. — This hood is made of four-thread 
Saxony yarn on medium-sized steel needles. Begin 
8 



at the front of the hood, under the border 
on 115 stitches. Knit back and 
Purl back in the 24th row. 

Twenty-fifth row. — This begins the fancy 



Cast 
forth for 23 rows. 



pat- 



together, k 1, and 
Knit back plain, 
Then knit back 




No. 5. — Child's Knitted Hood. 



tern. K 1, th o twice, k 2 

repeat from * across the row. 

dropping the put-over thread. 

and forth plain 4 times. 

Repeat the last 6 rows 4 times more. This will 

make 5 fancy rows and 5 plain rows for the sides 

of the hood. 

Now knit across once more and purl back. Next 

cast off 37 stitches; then k 2 together, k 1, * th o 

twice, k 2 together, k 1, and repeat 10 times more 

from last *. Then fasten on a thread and cast off 

the stitches left on the 
left-hand needle. Then 
continue knitting the 
pattern until there are 
8 more plain stripes 
and 8 more fancy 
stripes; next, after the 
last plain stripe, knit 
across once and purl 
back. Then cast off 
the stitches. Join the 
crown-edges to the 
side-edges by an over- 
and-over stitch. 

To Knit the Border. 
— Cast on 12 stitches. 
Knit 1 row plain. In 
the next and succeed- 
ing alternate rows, k 1, 
wind the yarn twice 
around the left fore- 
finger, pass the right 
needle through the next 
stitch on the left needle 
and also under the top 
of the 2 wind-overs; 
throw the yarn around 
the needle and draw it 
under the wind-overs 
and through the stitch 
as in ordinary knitting. 
Repeat across the row, 
knitting the last stitch 
plain. Knit the alter- 
border over the plain 



the 



nate rows plain. Sew 
portion of the hood. 

To Make the Cape. — Make 1 double crochet at 
one end or lower corner of the hood, 1 chain 
stitch, skip 1 stitch of the knitting, 1 double in the 
next; repeat across the work. 

Next row. — 4 chain, 1 double in each double 
underneath, with i-chains between. 

Next roiv. — 5 chain, 1 double in the first double 
underneath, * 2 doubles in the next double with 1 
chain between; 1 chain, 1 double in the next 
double and repeat from * across the row. 

Next row. — Same as last except that each of the 
2 doubles come in the space made by the 2 doubles 
underneath. 



114 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Next two rows. — 5 chain, 1 double in the double 
underneath, * 4 doubles, with 1 chain between the 
2nd and 3rd doubles, in the space made by the 2 
doubles underneath, 1 chain, 1 double in the next 
double; repeat from * across the row. 

Next row. — Like last row, except that between 
the 2nd and 3rd doubles make 2 chain and catch 
with a single crochet in the top of the 2nd double 
to form a point, and so on across the row. 

Run No. 2 ribbon through the fancy stripes as 
seen in the picture, and also across the neck of the 
hood, drawing it in a trifle at the back to shape it 
to the head, and tying it in a bow. Sew on the 
ties and add a narrow lace ruching; then line the 
hood with thin silk. Finish the top with a hand- 
some bow of ribbon. 

Infants' Knitted Sack. 

No. 6. — This little sack is made of pink and 
white Saxony yarn. 
Cast on 281 stitches with 
the pink wool, and knit 
back and forth 6 times. 

Now begin the pattern 
at the 7th row as fol- 
lows: 

Knit 1, th o, k 5, * slip 
1, k 2 together, pass slip- 
ped stitch over last one, 
k 5, th o, k 1, th o, k 5, 
and repeat from * across 
the work, ending with th 
o, k 1. 

Eighth row . — Seam 
back. 

Repeat the 2 rows un- 
til there are 5 holes, and 
then join on the white 
wool and knit in the same 
way until there are 5 more 
holes, or 10 in all. 

After the 10th hole is 
made, knit back and forth 
3 times to form a rib, nar- 
rowing, in the last row, once at each side of every 
point. 

Now knit the pattern again as follows: K 1, 
th o, k 4, * slip 1, k 2 together, pass slipped stitch 
over, k 4, th o, k 1, th o, k 4, and repeat from * 
across the row. 

Seam back; and knit in this way until there are 
3 rows of holes; and then make another rib without 
narrowing. 

Now join on the white and make 4 rows of holes, 
the same as the last 3 rows of holes. 

Join on the pink and knit a 3rd rib, narrowing 
as in the 1st rib. 

Join on the white; k 1, th o, k 3, * slip 1, k 2 
together, pass slipped stitch over, k 3, th o, k 1, 
th o, k 3, and repeat from *. 

Make 3 rows of holes in this way; then join on 
the pink and make a 4th rib without narrowing. 

Join on the white, and make 3 more holes the 




No. fi. - Infants' Knitted Sack 



same as last 3; join on the pink and make a 5th rib 
without narrowing. 

Now, for each side of the front, take off 5^ 
points, slipping the stitches onto another needle, 
and knit 4 divisions and 3 ribs according to the 
directions for the last division and rib, being care- 
ful to keep the work even at the arm-hole edge. 

Then make 3 ribs and 2 divisions like the last 
ones, narrowing once each time across, at the 
shoulder edge. 

Then make 1 division of 2 holes, and half a rib; 
and then a row of holes for the ribbon as follows: 
K 1, * th o twice, narrow and repeat from * across 
the work. 

Knit back plain, dropping the 2nd half of each 
of the 2 put-over threads, and bind off. 

For the Back. — Knit off 8 whole points and 1 
half point at each side, and then knit the divisions 
and ribs in the same order as those for the front, 
also narrowing at each shoulder edge and finishing 

the top with holes, the 
same as the top of the 
front. 

Next knit the other side 
of the front the same as 
the first one, and join the 
shoulder edges by an 
over-and-over stitch. 

For the Collar. — Cast on 
161 stitches with the pink 
wool, and knit 1 rib. Then 
k 1, th o, k 3, * slip 1, k 
2 together, pass slipped 
stitch over, k 3, th o, k 1, 
th o, k 3, and repeat from 
* across the work, ending 
with th o, k 1. 
Seam back. 

Make 3 rows of holes 
for this division. 

Join on the white and 
make a rib, narrowing 
once at each side of every 
point. K 1, th o, k 2, * 
slip 1, k 2 together, pass 
slipped stitch over, k 2, th o, k 1, th o, k 2, and 
repeat from*. This division also has 3 holes. 

Join on the pink, make half a rib without nar- 
rowing, and finish with a row of holes like those in 
the top of the sack. 

Lay the collar over the sack, and run a ribbon 
or cord through the 2 rows of holes at the same 
time. 

For each Sleeve. — Cast on 85 stitches with the 
pink and knit 1 rib. Then knit like the bottom 
of the sack, 10 holes and 1 rib. Now join on 
the pink and make a division of 4 holes, and 
then a rib narrowed once at each side of every 
point. 

Now make 3 divisions of the white and 3 ribs of 
the pink, knitting 4 stitches at each side of the 
point instead of 5; and then bind off. Sew up the 
sleeves and join them to the arm-hole by an over- 
and-over stitch. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



115 



Child's Knitted Petticoat. 

No. 7. — Use Saxony yarn of any tint desired, 
and 4 medium-sized wooden needles. 

Begin at the border, casting on any number 




No. 7. — Child's Knitted Petticoat. 

of stitches required that may be divided by 19. 

First round. — Knit 8, si 1, k 2 together, pass 
slipped stitch over, k 8 and repeat. 

Second round. — * K 7 ; k 1 out of the front and 1 out 
of the back of the next stitch, thus making 1 stitch; 
si 1, k 2 together, pass slipped stitch over; make 1 
out of the next stitch as before ; k 6 and repeat from *. 

Make 2 more rounds like second. 

Fifth round. — * K 4, k 2 together, th o, k 2 to- 
gether, k 5, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 2 together 
and repeat from *. 

Sixth round. — Plain. 

Repeat 5th and 6th rounds until the border is 5 
holes deep. There will now be 17 stitches for 
each scollop. 

For the Skirt-Portion, in First round. — K plain, 
knitting 2 together at the center of each scollop. 

Second roitnd. — * K 10 for the plain stripe. Then 
for the fancy stripe, p 1 and k 1 out of each of the 
next 6 stitches. Repeat from * to end of round. 

Third round. — * K 10, ** si 1, k 1, pass slipped 
stitch over, and repeat from ** c; times more. Re- 
peat from * for all the round, 
rounds 27 times, or as many 
quired by the length desired. 

To decrease for the Waist: 
k 3 together and repeat. 

Second round. — Plain. 



Repeat 2nd and 3rd 
times as will be re- 

First round. — K z. 



Third round. — K 8, k 2 together and repeat. 

For the Bodice. — K 34 rounds plain. Then 
divide the stitches for the front and back evenly, 
taking off 3 stitches at the beginning and end of 
each half and leaving them on a piece of cotton 
to be used under the arm later. 

Now work each half separately for 16 rows, knit- 
ting 1 row and purling 1 row alternately, and keep- 
ing the end stitches plain in the purled rows. 

Then work 8 rows of 1 plain, 1 p, keeping n 
stitches at each end plain. Then knit the 11 
stitches at one side, cast off the stitches of the 
fancy portion, and knit the remaining n. Then 
knit back and forth on each n stitches, decreas- 
ing 1 at the inner edge in every other row until 
there are but 6 stitches left at each side. Then 
cast these off. 

Work the back in the same manner and join the 
two on the shoulders by an over-and-over stitch. 

To form the Sleeve. — Pick up 39 stitches around 
each arm-hole, and also the stitches on the cotton 
under the arm. Knit 6 rounds plain, then 6 rounds 
as follows: K 1, p 1, and repeat. Then cast off. 

Then around the neck and sleeves work with a 
crochet hook as follows: 1 single crochet, 3 chain, 
skip 1 stitch, 1 single crochet in the next stitch, 
and repeat. Insert a tasseled cord or a ribbon in 
the neck edge and tie at the back. 

Boys' Knitted Vest, to Wear With a Sailor 
Blouse. 

No. 8. — This vest is knitted of blue and white 
Saxony yarn in plain back-and-forth rows. To 
make it, cut a pattern in paper of the shape illus- 
trated, and of the size desired, or required by the 
boy who is to wear the vest. Knit back and forth 
as described above, making each stripe about half 
an inch wide. Narrow th6 neck and shoulder 
edges to fit the pattern, binding off when made 
necessary by the outlines of the pattern. Join the 
two sections at one shoulder by an over-and-over 
seam or by single crochets. Bind the neck with 
ribbon and fasten the other shoulder edges to- 
gether with buttons and 
button-holes. Sew tape 
loops to the lower cor- 
ners of the front and 
tape ties to the corners 
of the back, and in ad- 
justing the vest pass the 
tapes through the loops 
and tie them in front. 

If preferred, this vest 
may be knitted and 
purled so that the work 
will have a right and 
wrong side like a stock- 
ing. If desired, the 
neck edge may have a 

plain knitted or crocheted edge, and the ribbon may 
be placed underneath it for a stay. Red may be 
used in place of white, if desired. 

The vest may also be used as a chest protector 
to be worn under a coat or cloak. 






r:,, 



No. 8. — Boys' Knitted Vest, 
to Wear with a Sailor Blouse. 



116 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



WmBBR 



Infant's Knitted, Long Bootees. 

No. 9. — This little article for babies' wear is 
made of pink and white Germantown yarn, and is 
knitted as follows: 

Cast on 52 stitches for the top, with the pink yarn. 

First 1-ow. — Knit 4, * k 2 together, k 4, and re- 
peat frcm * across the row. 

Second row. — Knit 4, pick up a stitch from the 
foundation, pass it on to the left-hand needle, * and 
knit it off; k 5, pick up another stitch and repeat 
from *. 

Third row. — Knit 3, k 2 together, * thread over, 
k 1, th o, k 2 together; then put the right-hand 
needle through the next stitch, th o, draw through, 
but do not slip the stitch 
mentioned off from the 
left-hand needle; slip 
the loop drawn through 
onto the left-hand needle 
by passing the needle 
through it from the front 
to the back; then draw 
the stitch first mentioned 
through this loop onto 
the right-hand needle, 
allowing the loop to slip 
down over it; now k 2 
together and repeat from 
* across the work, end- 
ing with knit 2 sepa- 
rately. 

Fourth row. — Knit 
plain. 

Join on the white and 
repeat the last 2 rows 
alternately until there are 
8 holes. Then knit 
plain, 3 times across, or 
until there are 2 ribs of 
white; then 4 times 
across with the pink, and 
5 times across with the 
white, seaming back the 
6th time across. Now 
knit back and forth 6 
times, and then begin the 
braided knitting as fol- 
lows: 

Knit 10; knit 5 onto 
another needle; knit 16 with the first needle; knit 
5 onto a second extra needle; knit 16 with the first 
needle. In knitting back, knit n, and also the 5 
on the last extra needle; now knit the next 16, 
and then knit the 5 on the first extra needle, and 
then knit the remaining stitches. Now knit across 
plain. Then knit n, seam the 10 in the braid, 
knit 11, seam the 10 in the braid and knit 10. Now 
repeat the last two rows, alternately, twice more. 

Next row. — Like the first row of braided knit- 
ting, except that you narrow once back (at the outer 
side) of each braid. 

In knitting back: Knit 10, and seam the 5 on the 
extra needle and also the 5 on the left-hand needle; 












's-^. 



No. 9. — Infant's Knitted, Long Bootee. 



then knit 11, seam 5 on the second extra needle, 
seam 5 on the left-hand needle, knit 9. Now com- 
plete this section of the braid the same as the first 
one, by 6 rows more. 

Now make 3 more sections of the braided knit- 
ting, narrowing the same as in the last one, at the 
beginning of every section. 

Knit the first 15 stitches off onto another needle; 
then, with another needle knit the next 13, for the 
top of the foot, and leave the remaining stitches on 
the left-hand needle. Now, on the 13 stitches, knit 
back and forth 21 times for the top of the foot, and 
fasten the yarn. Now with the needle on which are 
the first 15 stitches, pick up 11 stitches along the 
right-side edge of the foot, slip the needle through 

the 13 stitches at the toe 
and pick up the 11 stitch- 
es at the left-side edge 
of the foot; then join on 
the yarn and knit off the 
stitches remaining on the 
other needle. 

Now knit 2 ribs, and 
seam back; then knit 2 
ribs more and join on 
the pink worsted. 

Now use 4 needles, 
dividing the stitches 
evenly on 3 of them, so 
as to close the work at 
the back. Then knit 9 
rounds, and close the 
foot as follows: Divide 
the stitches evenly onto 
2 of the needles. Knit 
to within 1 stitch of the 
center; then knit this 1 
stitch, the center stitch 
and the next stitch be- 
yond, together. Now 
fold the work so that the 
two needles face each 
other and the stitches on 
each are exactly opposite 
each other. Then knit 
2 stitches together at 
once, 1 from each needle, 
at the same time bind- 
ing them off. Bind them 
all off in this manner 
and fasten the yarn to the last stitch. If preferred 
the stitches may be bound off singly and the foot 
sewed together. 

Sew the bootee together at the back. Run a 
twisted or crocheted cord through the lowest row 
of holes in the top, tip it with tassels of pink and 
white and tie in front. Dark colors may be used, 
if preferred; or, pale tints of gray, blue, pink, yel- 
low or tan-color may be selected. 

Plain white bootees are always pretty, especially 
when the infant is dressed all in white. If pre- 
ferred, the yarn may be shrunk before it is used, as 
the little articles may need frequent washings. 
Spanish knitting yarn is often used for them. 



WSpm 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



117 



Infant's Napkin Cover. 

No. 10. — This convenient article is made of 
Dexter's cotton No. 8 and may be constructed as 
follows : 

Cast on 25 stitches for the lower edge. 

Then knit 16 ridges, widening each time across. 
(To widen, knit 2 stitches out of 1.) 

Now make 12 ridges without widening, and then 8 
ridges, narrowing once each time across in the first 
4 ridges, and once every ottier time across in the 
last 4 ridges. 

Now knit 4 ridges without widening. Then take 
off onto another needle at each side, 10 stitches, 
leaving the remaining ones on a thread or third 



style, narrowing each time across until a point is 
made. Sew tapes to these points and run another 
tape in the holes at the top. Sew on buttons as 
seen in the picture, and when adjusting the cover 
fasten the lower edge in place with safety-pins, and 
tie the tapes in front. 

Girls' Knitted Petticoat. 

(For Illustration see nest Page,.) 

No. 11. — Germantown wool or the more expen- 
sive camel's-hair wool may be used in knitting this 
little petticoat. White or colored yarn may be 
chosen for it, or two colors may be united. It is 
knitted in two parts which are over-seamed together. 

Begin with the border at the bottom of the 




No. 10. — Infant's Napkin Cover. 



needle. Knit back and forth on" each 10 stitches 
to make 5 ridges, narrowing once at the inner edge 
for every other rib. Make the button-holes while 
knitting the last ridge as follows : K 1, th o, n, k 1, 
th o, n, k 1; knit back plain to complete the 5 th 
ridge, and bind off each side. 

Pick up the stitches along the inner or narrowed 
edges of the sections just knitted, also picking up 
the stitches that are on the thread. Now work 
back and forth 4 times, knitting across one way 
and seaming back. Then make holes for the rib- 
bon after the method described for the button-holes; 
then knit back plain and bind off. 

Now across the ends of the 12 ribs that were not 
widened, pick up the stitches at each side, as seen 
in the engraving, and knit back and forth in ridge 



skirt, casting on 18 stitches and knitting to and 
fro as follows: 

First row. — Knit 15, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 1. 

Second row. — Knit 4, purl 15. 

Third row. — K 16, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 1. 

Fourth row. — Knit 20. 

Fifth row. — Purl 15, k 2, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 1. 

Sixth row. — Knit 21. 

Seventh row. — Knit 18, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 1. 

Eighth row. — Knit 7, purl 15. 

Ninth row. — Knit 22. 

Tenth row. — Cast off 4 and k 17. 

Eleventh row. — Purl 15, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 1. 

Twelfth row. — Knit 19. 

Thirteenth row. — Same as third. 

Fourteenth row. — Knit 5, purl 15. 



118 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Fifteenth row. — Knit 1 7, th o, k 2 together, th o, k 1 . 
Sixteenth row. — Knit 21. 

Seventeenth row. — Purl 15, k 3, th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 1. 

Eighteenth and Nineteenth rows. — Knit 22. 

Twentieth row. 
— Cast off 4, k 2, p 

15- 

Twenty-first row. 
— Same as first. 

Twejity-s e c ond 
row. — Knit 19. 

Twenty- third 
row. — Purl 15, k 1, 
th o, k 2 together, 
th o, k 1. 

Tw e n ty-fourth 
row. — Knit 20. 

Twen ty - fifth 
row. — Knit 17, th 
o, k 2 together, th 
c, k 1. 

7' we n ty - sixth 
rcnv. — Knit 6, purl 

, th o, k 2 together, 




No. 11. — Girls' Knitted Petticoat. 

(For Directions see this and preced- 
ing Page.) 



-Knit 18 



Twenty-seventh row. 
th o, k 1. 

Twenty-eighth row. — Knit 22. 

Twenty-ninth row. — Purl 15, k 7. 

Thirtieth row. — Cast off 4 and knit 17. 

Repeat these 30 rows (3 scollops) 8 times more; 
then repeat the first 10 rows once, and cast off. 

Now out of the top of this border take up 120 
stitches. Begin on the right side and knit 1 row plain. 

Second row. — Purl. 

Third row. — Knit. 

Fourth row. — Purl. This will cause all the 
stitches to appear purled on the right side. 

Fifth row. — Knit plain. 

Sixth row. — Knit 1, purl 1 across the row. 

Seventh to Twenty-third rows. — Same as last row 
except that each stitch that appears purled in one 
row must appear knitted in the next, and vice versa. 

Twenty-fourth row. — Same as fifth. 

Twenty-fifth to Twenty-eighth ro7vs. — Same as 
2nd to the 5th rows. 

Twenty -ninth row. — (Right side of work.) * Purl 
5, k 1, p 1, k 1, and repeat from * across the work. 

Thirtieth row. — Knit 1; * purl 1, k 7, and re- 
peat across the work, ending with k 6. 

Thirty-first row. — * Purl 1, k 3, p 1 
k 1, and repeat from * across the work. 

Thirty-second row. — K 1, * p 1, k 2, p 
repeat from *, ending with k 1. 

Repeat from the 29th to the 32nd row 14 times 
more. Then repeat once more the 29th and 30th rows. 

Now make 1 plain row, and then 38 rows in 
ribbed knitting, 2 plain and 2 purled stitches form- 
ing the ribs. Then make 1 plain row. Then 
narrow for the belt, by knitting every 2 stitches 
together, so that all the stitches will appear plain 
on the right side. 

Knit 3 rows like the 2nd to the 4th; then a row 
of holes as follows: Th o, k 2 together, and repeat 



k 1, p 1, 
3, k 2, and 



across the row. Then make 3 rows like those 
preceding the last and cast off. 

This completes one-half, or the front of the 
petticoat. Knit the back half in the same man- 
ner except that the last 25 rows are divided at 
the middle and knit separately to form the placket 
opening, join the two halves as described at the 
beginning of these instructions, and insert a tas- 
seled cord or a narrow tie-ribbon in the holes at 
the top of the skirt. 

By increasing the number of stitches for each 
half and knitting it longer, the skirt could be made 
for an adult. 

Infants' Knitted Boots. 

No. 12. — Commence at the top of leg, and cast 
on 1 needle 36 stitches with blue wool. 

First row. — Knit. 

Second row. — With white wool, purl. 

Third row. — Knit. 

Fourth row. — Make 1, k 2 together throughout 
the row. 

Fifth row. — Knit. 

Sixth row. — Purl. 

Seventh row. — Knit. 

Eighth row. — With blue wool, knit. 

Ninth row. — With white wool, m 1, k 2 together 
throughout. 

Tenth row. — With blue wool, knit. 

Eleventh row. — With white wool, p 1 and k 1 
alternately 7 times, k 8, k 1, and p 1 alternately 
7 times. 

Twelfth row. — Knit the purled and purl the knit- 
ted stitches in the last row. 

Thirteenth row. — K 1 and p 1 alternately 7 times, 
k 8, p 1 and k 
1 alternately 
to the end of 
the row. 

Fourteenth 
row. — P 1 and 
k 1 alternately 
7 times, p 1; 
take a third 
needle, p 3; 
with the first 
right-hand 
needle p the 
4 next stitch- 
es, then k 1 
and p 1 alter- 
nately to the 
end of row. 

Fifteenth 
row. — P 1 and 
k 1 alternate- 
ly 7 times, k 1, 
k the 3 stitch- 
es on the 3rd 

or extra needle then the 4 next stitches on the left- 
hand needle; k 1 and p 1 alternately to the end of row. 

Sixteenth row. — Knit the purled and purl the knit- 
ted stitches of last row and repeat from the 13th 
row 4 times more. 




No. 12. — Infants' Knitted Boot. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



119 



Thirty-third row. — K i and p i alternately 7 
times, k 8; p 1 and k 1,3 times. 

Thirty-fourth row. — P 1 and k 1, 3 times; p 1, 
take the 3rd needle, p 3; with the right-hand needle 
p the 4 next stitches, k 1, p 1, k 1, p 1. 

Thirty-fifth row. — P 1, k 1 twice; k 1, k the 3 
stitches from the extra needle, k 5 from the 1st 
left-hand needle, p 1 and k 1 twice. 

Thirty-sixth row. — P 1 and k 1 twice, p 10, k 1, 
p 1, k 1. 

Thirty- seventh rou>. — K 1, p 1 twice; k 8, p 1, 
k 1, p 1, k 1. 

Thirty-eighth row. — P 1, k 1 twice; p 1, take the 
3rd needle and p 3; with the right-hand needle 
p 4, k 1, p t, k 1. 

Thirty-ninth row. — K 1, p 1, k 2, 1; the 3 from 
the extra needle, k 4 from 
the left-hand needle, k 1, p 
1, k 1 

Fortieth row. — P 1, k 1, p 
10, k 1. 

Forty -first row. — K i,pi, 
k 8, p 1, k 1. 

Forty-second row. — P 1, k 

I > P x > P 3 on tne extra 
needle; with the right-hand 
needle p 4, k 1. 

Forty-third rmv. — K 2, k 
the 3 stitches from the 3rd 
needle, k 5 from the left- 
hand needle. 

Forty-fourth row. — P 10; 
now work on the stitches left 
for the side of the boot, k 
1 and p 1 in each of the 6 
next stitches. Knit to end 
of row. 

Forty-fifth row. — K until 
you have worked across the 
10 toe-stitches, then k 1 and 
p 1 in each of the 6 next 
stitches; then knit to end of 
row. 

Forty-sixth row. — With 
blue wool, k 1 and p 1 in the 
1st and 10th of the 10 stitches of the toe 
the rest. 

Forty-seventh row. — With white wool, knit. 

Forty-eighth to Fifty-seventh rows. — With blue 
wool, knit plain; then cast off, sew the boot up on the 
wrong side with a needle and wool and draw the toe 
up into a nice shape; run a narrow ribbon through 
the holes of the ninth row, and tie. in a bow in 
front. 

Child's Knitted Leggings. 

No. 13. — These leggings are made of white 
Germantown wool, and are for a child of one 
or two years of age. They are made in two sec- 
tions, which are joined by a middle seam, as seen 
in the engraving. 

Begin to knit each section as follows: Cast on 80 
stitches for the top edge. Knit 2, purl 2, and re- 
peat across the needle. Knit in this way 4 times 




No. U 



Knit 



across, being careful to preserve the regular order 
of the stitches in the ribs. 

The Fifth time across. — K 2, p 2, k i, * th o 
twice, n, p 1, k 2, p 2, k 1, and repeat from * across 
the row. In working back, work in the regular 
order, except that you drop the put-over thread to 
form the holes for the cord. 

Now knit across 8 times more the same as the 
first 4 times. 

Now knit 8 stitches, then knit back on the 8; 
k 16, and then knit back; k 24, and knit back; 
k 32, knit back; k 40, knit back; k 48, knit back. 
This will make 6 ridges at one side of the work 
before you have knit once entirely across, and they 
are made to lengthen the back portion of the sec- 
tion. Now knit back and forth entirely across, 
until there are 43 ridges at 
the front edge of the section. 
Next knit 15 ridges, nar- 
rowing once at the beginning 
of every time across. There 
should now be 50 stitches on 
the needle. 

To Make the Fancy Por- 
tion. — K 3, p 7, and repeat 
across the needle. In work- 
ing back, p 7 and k 3, across 
the needle. Work in this 
way until there are 3 ridges, 
and then reverse the design 
for the next 3 ridges as fol- 
lows: P 5, k 3, * p 7, k 3, 
and repeat from * across the 
needle, except at the end, 
where you knit 5. In work- 
ing back, k 5, p 3, k 7, p 3, 
and repeat across the needle 
as before. 

Repeat this pattern until 
there are 5 blocks as seen in 
the picture. 

To Make the Braid and 
Remainder of Section: First 
row.—K 4, p 3, k 9, p 3, k 
I 2 , P 3, k 9, P 3, k 4- 
P 1, k 3, P 9, k 3, P 1, k 10, 
k3- 



hild's Knitted Leggings. 



Second row. — K 3, 
p 1, k 3, p 9, k 3, p 1, 

Repeat first and second rows. 

Fifth row. — K 4, p 3; * take another needle and 
knit 3 very loosely onto it; now knit 3 stitches with 
the first or right-hand needle; now place the extra 
needle with its 3 stitches back of the first needle; 
then knit 3 more with the first needle, and with this^ 
same needle knit off the 3 stitches on the extra 
needle to form the twist of the braid.* Now 
p 3, k 12, p 3, and repeat between the stars; p 3, 

k 4 - 

Sixth row. — -K3, p 1, k 3, p 9, k 3, p 1, k 10, 
P 1, k3, p 9, k 3, p 1, k 3 . 

Repeat from the first row of braid until there 
are 20 ridges at the middle portion of the front. 

For the Instep. — Knit 31 stitches; slip the remain- 
ing 19 onto another needle; knit back 12 stitches 
of the 31, and leave the remaining 19 on the first 



120 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



needle. Knit the 12 stitches now on the center 
needle back and forth until there are 10 ridges; 
knit 3 more ridges, narrowing once every other time 
across. Now with the needle left at the right side 
of the work, pick up the stitches at the adjoining 
side of the instep-portion and knit across the toe; 
then with the needle at the left side of the work 
pick up the stitches along the adjoining edge of the 
instep, and with the right-hand needle knit them 
off. Now knit back and forth until there are 6 
ridges below the instep-portion, and bind off. Knit 
a strap 5 stitches wide and 15 ridges long, and sew 
it to the lower edges of the foot-portion as seen in 
the picture. 

Now sew up each leg-seam, and join the two sec- 
tions by a middle seam. 

Crochet scollops around the top as follows: Make 
* 4 chain, 2 double crochets drawn up long and 
caught down flatly by a sin- 
gle crochet; repeat from *. 

Run a cord through the 
holes made for it, and tip 
it with tassels. A ribbon 
or an elastic may be used 
in place of the cord. 

Child's Knitted Shirt. 

No. 14. — This engraving 
illustrates a pretty little 
shirt for a child 3 or 4 years 
of age. It is made on 4 
No. 16 needles, with Shet- 
land wool. 

On 3 needles cast 176 
stitches, using 11 for each 
scollop. Divide the stitch- 
es as follows : 88 on one 
needle, and 42 on each of 
the other two. 

First four rounds. — Purl 

Fifth round. — K 1, * th 
o, k 3, k 2 together twice, 
k 3, th o, k 1, and repeat 
from * around the work. 

Sixth, Seventh and Eighth rounds. — Repeat the 
5th round. 

Next three rounds. — Purl. Then repeat from the 
5th round twice more, being careful to make the 
holes come over those underneath, and continuing 
the pattern from where it was left off, to begin the 
three purled rounds. 

Next repeat the 5th round 8 times. 

Knit 2 plain rounds. 

Then knit 40 rounds of 4 plain stitches and 2 
purled ones alternately, in rib style. 

Now, on the needle having 88 stitches knit back 
and forth, preserving the ribbed effect, for 15 rows ; 
then make r6 rows of plain knitting. 

Now on the first 14 stitches of the next row, knit 
back and forth for 20 rows and cast off. 

Then cast off the remaining stitches so that there 
will be 14 stitches left for the other shoulder, 
which you knit to correspond with the first one. 



Now put all the remaining stitches onto one needle 
and knit 15 rows of ribbing and 16 plain rows and 
cast off. Join the ends of the shoulder portions to 
the top of the edge just finished, and complete the 
neck edge with crochet as follows : 

First row. — Double crochets with 1 -chains be- 
tween in every other stitch of the knitting. 

Second row. — Double crochets arranged in clus- 
ters, as seen in the picture. 

To make the Sleeves. — Cast on either 66 or 88 
stitches, according to the size of the arm, and 
repeat the first 14 rows of the pattern. Then knit 
and purl alternate rows for 16 rows, cast off and 
sew to the arm-hole. 

Knitted Under-Dress for Children. 

(For Illustrations see next Page.) 



NOS. 15, l6 AND 17.- 




-The material used for knit- 
ting this little garment is 
white lambs' wool, but any 
color preferred may be 
used. The front and back 
parts are knitted separately 
and each is 15^ inches 
long. The skirt, when the 
parts are joined, is 38^ in- 
ches wide or around. Each 
section is begun at the low- 
er edge, and when com- 
pleted, all three are seamed 
together on the wrong side. 
Begin the front as follows: 
Cast on 144 stitches and 
knit the scolloped portion 
(see No. 16) as below di- 
rected: 

First row. — Slip 1 and 
purl all the rest. 

Second row. — Slip 1 and 
knit all the rest. 

Third row. — Slip 1, *k 2 
together, k 3, th o, k r, 
th o, k 3, k 2 together at the 
back; repeat from * and 
at the end of the row k 1. 
Fourth row. — Slip 1 and purl the rest. 
Fifth, Seventh and Ninth rows. — Like the 3rd. 
Sixth row. — Slip 1, knit the rest. 
Eighth row. — Slip 1, purl the rest. 
Tenth row. — Slip i, knit the rest. 
Eleventh row. — Slip 1, purl the rest. 
Twelfth row. — Slip 1, knit the rest. 
Repeat from the 3rd row, 5 times more; then 
repeat the 3rd row once more, except that you 
omit the put-over threads, in order to decrease 
the 24 stitches. This completes the scolloped 
portion. 

Now begin the basket pattern seen below the 
holes in illustration No. 17, as follows: 

Purl 3, knit 3 across the row; knit back purling 
the knitted stitches and knitting the purled stitches 
so as to preserve the effect of the pattern. Knit 
over and back once more in this order; this will 
form r section of the pattern. Now knit the next 



Child's Knitted Shirt. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



121 



section, changing the order of the stitches so that 
a purled block will come over a knitted one and 
vice versa. Knit in this way for 48 rows, gradually 
decreasing 1 stitch at a time at each side until 12 




No. 15. — Knitted Under-Dress for Children. 
(For Directions see this and preceding Page.) 

stitches are decreased. This brings the skirt por- 
tion of the front to the waist-line. 

The waist portion is then begun and 28 rows 
knitted without increase or decrease. This brings 
you to the left arm-hole. 

The first row for the arm-holes is as follows: 
Cast off 4 stitches at each side and gradually nar- 
row 9 stitches at the sides in the next 12 rows. 
Then knit 8 rows without decreasing; then cast on 
gradually, in the next 12 rows, 8 stitches. In the 
next row cast off from 4 to 6 stitches. Now begin 
one shoulder on 9 stitches, leaving the remaining 
stitches unknitted. Knit 12 rows, gradually de- 
creasing the 9 stitches to 1. Knit the other shoul- 
der section to correspond with the first. 

For one-half of the Back. — Cast on 108 stitches 
and work the scolloped pattern as high as that on 
the front. Then work 48 rows of the basket pat- 
tern and then 3 purled rows (see picture No. 17;) 
but in the first purled row knit every 3 stitches 
on the first 9 blocks together. In this way the 
skirt is fulled at little at the middle. After knitting 
these 3 rows, make the holes for the ribbon as 
follows: Slip 1, * k 1, n, th o twice, k 2 together 
through the back of the stitches, and repeat from *. 

Next row. — Knit plain, purling the second half 
of each put-over thread. Then make 3 more 
purled rows. This brings the work to the waist 
portion. Now make 24 rows of the basket pattern, 
which brings you to the arm-hole. Then work 4 
more rows gradually decreasing 6 stitches at the 
arm-hole side; now make 16 rows without decreas- 
ing. Now knit the shoulder on 9 stitches to cor- 
respond with that of the front. 

Knit the second half of the back to correspond 
with the first. 

Sew the side seams of the parts as suggested. 
Slip the stitches of all 3 sections including those of 



the shoulders onto 1 needle, and knit the entire 
upper edge like illustration No. 17, which has been 
described at the waist line of the back. Finish each 
arm-hole with a strip knitted like the neck edge 
and sew on over-and-over. 

Finish the edges with single crochets and chains 
(see No. 17.) Close the seam at the back, leaving 
an opening as long as desired, and finish its edges 
with single crochets. Insert narrow ribbons, tying 
them in bows as seen in the engraving. 

Design for a Child's Knitted Petticoat. 

(No Illustration.) 

This is a very pretty design and may be knitted 
in Germantown wool or Saxony yarn. It is knit 
in widths that are afterwerd sewed together and 
finished with any pretty crocheted edge liked. For 
each width, cast on 135 stitches. 

First row. — Knit 2 and purl 1 all the way across. 

Second row. — K 2 and p 7 across the row. 

Third row. — Knit 6 and purl 3 all the way across. 

Fourth row. — K 4 and p 5 all the way across. 

Fifth row. — Knit 4 and purl 5 all the way across. 

Sixth row. — Knit 6 and purl 3 all the way across. 

Seventh row. — K 2 and p 7 all the way across. 

Eighth row. — K 8 and p 1 all the way across. 




No. 16. 




No. 17. 

Nos. 16 and 17. — Details for Knitted Under-Dress. 
(For Directions see this and preceding Page.) 



The pattern is to be repeated until the skirt is as 
long as is necessary. The garment is intended 
either for a girl or boy. If for a boy, it can be 
used as a kilt skirt, with a waist. 



122 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted Cover for a Baby's Feeding Bottle, 
with Detail. 

Nos. 1 8 and 19. — This cover is useful in keep- 
ing the contents of a baby's feeding bottle from 

becoming cold too 
quickly, and the cord 
prevents the child from 
throwing the bottle to 
the floor. As illus- 
trated, it is made of red 
and gray knitting yarn, 
knitted back and forth 
in alternate stripes, as 



for 



For the ribbed top, knit 2 and purl 2 alternately 



2/2 



inches. 





No. 18. 



No. 19. 



Nos. 18 and 19. — Knitted Cover for a Baby's Feeding Bottle, 
with Detail. 



may be seen by referring to engraving No. 19. To 
begin it, cast on 50 stitches, and for the fiat stripe 
knit 4 rows, as follows: K 1 row, p 1 row, and re- 
peat once more. This stripe may be of the gray 
yarn. Then fasten on the red and purl 4 rows. 
Repeat each stripe 12 times, bind off and close the 
side edges with a crochet hook and slip stitches. 

Crochet a bottom-piece, beginning at the center 
and working round and round in single crochets. 
Join it by a row of single crochets. 

Finish the top as follows : 1 s c, 1 ch, 2 d c, 
1 ch, 1 s c ; repeat around the entire edge. The 
cord is knitted round and round with 4 needles on 
a foundation of 9 stitches, and is about 26 inches 
long. A short section of the cord is also added 
about the neck of the bottle and joined to the long 
cord as seen in the picture to prevent the cover 
from slipping off the bottle. 

The long cord is fastened on at one end by a 
button and button-hole, so that the cover may be 
easily removed when the bottle is to be cleaned. 

Child's Knitted Leggings. 

No. 20. — Use Germantown wool or any yarn of 
a similar texture and weight. Four needles are 
necessary. 

Cast on 63 stitches, making 20 on each of 2 
needles, and 23 on the 3rd; the odd stitch .is 
for the seam, which is purled at the end of 
the last needle in one round, and knitted in the 
other ; this stitch is knitted in the same way 
throughout the work. 



For the leg knit 3 rounds and purl 3 rounds 

alternately, for 1^ inch, then on larger needles 

knit 2 rounds and purl 2 rounds for 3 inches ; now 

take the smaller needles and continue as before, 

but decrease for the ankle gradually by knitting or 

purling, as the case may be, the 2nd and 3rd 

stitches of the first needle together ; and the last 2 

stitches but 1 of the last needle together; that is, 

decreasing on each side of the seam-stitch in every 

3rd round until you have only 20 stitches left ; knit 

1 and purl 1 alternately for 2 inches. 

Now on the 21 stitches at the back of the leg, 
knit 1 and purl 1 alternately in 1 row, 
and in the next row purl the knitted, 
and knit the purled stitches ; repeat 
these 2 rows for 1^ inch, as you would 
for, the heel of a stocking; put the 
stitches on a piece of cotton and tie it, 
to prevent their falling off ; pick up 12 
stitches at side of heel, knit across the 
front (still preserving the rib); pick up 
12 stitches at the other side of the heel, 
continue to work on the side-stitches and 
the front of the foot ; the side-stitches 
are knitted plain, and the front is rib- 
bed; decrease in every 3rd row by knit- 
ting together the last two stitches of the 
front side of the heel, and the first 2 
on the other side together, until all 

the side-stitches are 

taken in; then work 

on the front stitches 

for about 2 inches. 
Now pick up the 

stitches at sides of 

the foot, and those 

left on the cotton 

from the heel; purl 

for 5 rounds, then 

cast off. Finish the 

bottom of the foot 

with a crocheted 

edging worked as 

follows : 1 double 

crochet into a stitch, 

3 chain, 1 double 

into the first; skip 1 

stitch, and repeat 

from the beginning 

of the row. 

Sew on an elastic 

strap, as seen in the 

engraving, to keep 

the legging in place. 
Dark brown or 

blue, or black, is 

generally selected 

for making leggings, 

although a brighter 

blue, deep red, or gray may be chosen with a pretty 

effect. The leggings may be made larger or smal- 
ler by casting on more or less stitches. 




No. 20. — Child's Knitted Legging. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



123 



Knitted Petticoat Bodice, with Detail. 

Nos. 21 and 22. — This bodice, knitted very 
easily of white crochet or soft unbleached cotton, 
will be appreciated by those accustomed to wear 




Wssm< ' 'iPiill 
> -i ■ r' r 



IS! 







No. 21. 




No. 22. 
Nos. 21 and 22. — Knitted Petticoat Bodice, with Detail. 

a woolen bodice in winter, as it gives a most useful 
one for putting on in Spring and Autumn. The 
bodice is begun at the lower edge and knitted plain 
backwards and forwards in two halves on a foun- 
dation of from 92 to 101 stitches, the first stitch in 
each row being slipped; from 200 to 220 rows are 
required for the length. About 21 stitches are 
then reckoned for each shoulder and the work is 
continued as before, while between the shoulders 
the first and last, and also every third stitch is 
dropped (see No. 22), so that a transparent foun- 
dation is made. The dropped stitches are replaced 
again in the next row by taking up and knitting 
the upper bar-like threads, all the stitches in the 
next row being cast off between the shoulder for 
the neck-opening. Each shoulder-part is then knit- 
ted alone from 14 to 16 rows deep. The num- 
ber of stitches decreased are now put in again by 
casting on afresh, and the second half of the bodice 
knitted in just as many rows as the first. When 
the worker has reached the lower edge every third 
stitch, now including the shoulders, is again drop- 



ped, only at the side edges 3 stitches are always 
left. The number of stitches are now completed 
and cast off as before described. The side edges 
are crocheted together with a row of singles, leav- 
ing arm-holes 6% inches long. The neck-opening 
and edge of the arm-hole are secured and finished 
off with a picot-row made alternately of double 
crochets round several of the knitted bars, 5 chain, 
and 1 double back into the first chain. Narrow 
ribbon is slipped through these open insertion-rows 
and tied in bows. 

Baby's Knitted Stockings. 

No. 23. — This stocking is knitted quite loosely 
with white Saxony wool. Cast on 48 stitches, and 
knit back and forth. 

First row. — Plain knitting. Always slip the 1st 
stitch. 

Second to Eighteenth rows. — Ribbed knitting, 2 
stitches plain and 2 purled. 

Nineteenth row. — For a row of holes through 
which a ribbon is run, by turns knit 2 together and 
put the wool over. Then follow 58 rows of plain 
knitting, in the 32nd, 40th, 46th, 52nd and 56th of 
which, for narrowing, knit together the 3rd and 
4th stitches from the beginning and the 4th and 
3rd from the end. The succeeding 12 rows are in 
ribbed knitting, ,1 stitch plain and 1 purled. Then 
knit the heel in 2 separate halves, on the first n, 
and on the last n stitches of the row, omitting 
those between; knit 20 rows of plain knitting for 
each part of the heel, but in the 13th, 15th and 17th 
of them, at one stitch from the edge, knit 2 to- 
gether. After completing the 20th row cast off 
the stitches, take 
up the 10 edge 
stitches at the in- 
ner edge of the 
heel, and on all 
the stitches to- 
gether knit 44 
rows of plain 
knitting back and 
forth; but in the 
1 st row of the 44, 
for narrowing, 
knit together the 
first 2 stitches, 
the 10th and nth, 
then the nth and 
iothfromtheend, 
and the last 2 
stitches; in the 
29th row knit to- 
gether the6th and 
7th, 13th and 
14th, 20th and No. 23. — Baby's Knitted Stockings. 
2 1 st, and 27 th 
and 28th; in the 

33rd, 37th, 39th, 41st and 43rd rows, narrow in a 
straight line above the narrowings in the 29th row. 
Through the stitches left after the last row, draw 
the wool and fasten off; then sew up the edge- 
stitches of the stocking from the wrong side. 




124 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Child's Knitted Sack. 

No. 24. — This sack is made of 3-thread Saxony 
yarn in 2 colors — pale-blue and white. 

Cast on 100 stitches for the back and knit as 
follows: Knit once across plain; then knit 3 and 
purl or seam 7, and repeat across the row. Knit back 
as follows: Knit 7, purl 3, 
and repeat across the row. 

Now for the 3rd row, knit 
3, purl 7, and repeat across 
the row. 

Fourth row. — Purl. 

Fifth row. — Purl 4, knit 
3, * purl 7, knit 3 and repeat 
from * across the row. 

Sixth row. — Purl 5, * knit 
7, purl 3 and repeat from * 
across the row. 

Seventh row. — Purl 5, knit 
3, * purl 7 and knit 3, and 
repeat from * across the row. 

Eighth row. — Purl. 

Two sections of the pat- 
tern are formed by the de- 
tails just given. Repeat these 
two sections, purling every 
4th row, until there are 25 
sections counting from the 
bottom. 

Now cast on 65 additional 
stitches for one sleeve; purl back to the other side, 
and cast on 65 stitches for the other sleeve. Then 
knit 10 more sections, preserving the order of the 
design. Purl back. 

Now slip onto another needle 98 stitches, and 
bind off the next 37 stitches for the back of the neck. 

Now with the 95 stitches remaining, knit 4 sec- 
tions of the pattern, being careful to have the 
design come in the proper order. Now purl back. 
Then cast on 20 stitches and, working back, purl 
5, knit 3, * purl 7, knit 3, and repeat from * in the 
regular order across the row. Knit 10 more sec- 
tions and bind off the 65 stitches added for the 
sleeve and purl the remainder of the row. This 
completes the sleeve. Then knit 25 more sections 
to complete one front. 

Finish the other sleeve and front to correspond. 
The purled rows come on the wrong side of the 
garment. Close the seams of the sleeves and those 
under the arms by an over and over stitch. 

To Make the Edging. — The edging for the front 
and lower edges of the sack is knitted so as to fit 
the corners and is made crosswise instead of up and 
down. This necessitates casting on at once all of 
the stitches needed to make a strip long enough to 
reach along the edges mentioned, and long needles 
will be required for the work. Cast on 473 stitches 
and knit across once plain. 

First row. — Knit 1, * th o, k 1, slip 1, k 2 to- 
gether, pass slipped stitch over, k 1, th o, k 1, 
and repeat from * across the work, ending with 
th o, k 1. 

Second row. — Plain. 




No. 24. — Child's Knitted Sack. 



Repeat these two rows until the edging is 3 
holes deep. Then knit back across 18 points in 
the manner already directed, ending with k 1, th o, 
k 1. Then knit 4 together, slip 1, knit 3 together, 
pass slipped stitch over, knit 4 together, slip 1, 
knit 4 together, pass slipped stitch over, slip 1, 
knit 4 together, pass slipped stitch over, th o, k 1, 
th o, k 1 ; this will draw in the 
work for the turn at the cor- 
ner. Now work again ac- 
cording to the directions for 
the first row across 33 points, 
ending with k 1, th o, k 1; 
this will bring you to the 
other corner which you make 
the same as the first one, 
and then finish the row in the 
regular manner. 

Knit back plain to within 
1 of the 5 narrowed stitches 
at the corner; then knit 2 to- 
gether 3 times in succession, 
and knit plain to the next 
corner. Work the same as 
the first corner and then knit 
plain to the end of the row. 
Now knit back and forth 
according to the directions 
for the first 2 rows until the 
edging is 7 holes deep. Then 
knit across plain and bind 
off. Sew the edging on so that the rounding side 
of the points will be outward. 

To Knit the Collar. — Cast on 129 stitches. Knit 
according to the directions given for the edging, 
until 3 holes are made. Then work along the first 
and last 4 points of the collar the same as at the 
corners in the edging, to turn them. Work back 
and forth until the collar is 7 holes deep; and in 
the last row of plain knitting, pick up the stitches 
at each end, across the edge of 
the point. Work back as fol- 
lows, very loosely: Knit 1, * th 
o 3 times, k 2 together and re- 
peat from * across the row. In 
knitting back, knit 2 stitches to- 
gether and drop the remaining 2 
put-over threads. Repeat across 
the work. Then knit across plain 
twice, and bind off. Then sew 
the collar to the neck. 

For the Sleeve Edging. — Cast 
on 67 stitches and knit the same 
as for the lower edge, making 1 1 
points for each sleeve. Join the 
ends, sew it on and turn it back 
Run a ribbon in the holes at 
as seen in the engraving. 




No. 25.— Infants' 
Knitted Band. 

over the sleeve, 
the neck and tie 



Infants' Knitted Band. 

No. 25. — This band is made of 4-thread Saxony 
yarn in two sections, and is knitted back and 
forth in ribbed style — that is, knit 2, purl 2, knit 2, 
purl 2, etc., etc. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



125 




No. 26. — Baby's Hood. 



Cast on 76 stitches for each section and knit as 
directed above until there are 107 rows, or about 8 
inches in depth; bind off and sew the sections 
together by an over-and-over stitch. Finish the 
edge at the top and bottom with single crochets. 
At the center of the front crochet on a little 
strap, 11 single crochets 
wide and 5 rows deep. 

Baby's Hood. 

No. 26.- — Use Belding's 
knitting silk and quite 
coarse steel needles. Cast 
on 75 stitches. Knit 40 
stitches; turn. Knit back 10 
stitches. Turn again and 
knit 20 stitches; turn. Knit 
back 30 stitches; turn, 
knit back 40 stitches; turn, 
knit back 50 stitches. Knit 
all the stitches the next 
time. This makes the 
hood a little deeper at the 
top than at the sides. 

Knit 36 rows plain. Bind 
off 25 stitches; then knit 
54 rows plain on the next 

25 stitches, for the crown, and bind these stitches 

off; also bind off the 25 stitches that were left 

before knitting these. 

Sew the sides and crown together. Take up 

all the stitches at the neck and knit 16 rows for 

the cape. 

Make a row of double crochets all around the 

hood, working in every stitch. 

Draw the neck in with a cord, 

and trim the hood with eider 

down or any pretty fur, feath- 
er or silk trimming. Finish 

with ribbon ties and bows as 

seen in the picture. 

Infants' Knitted Socks. 

No. 27. — This sock is made 
of Saxony yarn, in two colors 
— pink and white — and is a 
very dainty little affair. 

To Make the Foot Portion. 
— Cast on 35 stitches. Knit 
back and forth for each row 
and make 6 rows, widening 
at the back by 1 stitch, and 

widening at the front by 2 stitches in every row, so 
that in the last row there will be 41 stitches. In 
widening so that no openings will result, two 
methods may be used. The first is as follows: Put 
the needle through a stitch in the ordinary manner, 
throw the thread around it twice and then knit the 
stitch off in the regular way, but keeping the two 
thrown-over threads on the needle to make the two 
new stitches required. In knitting these two new 
stitches, knit the first in the regular way and the 




second through the back. By the other method 
knit through the front of a stitch in the usual way, 
but do not slip it off the needle; now knit through 
the back of the same stitch and then slip it off. 

The plain knitting first made comes under the 
sole of the foot. 

To Make the Upper Part of the Foot. — After the 
6 rows of plain knitting are made, begin the 7th as 
follows: Knit 2, p 2, k 2, p 2, and repeat across the 
row until there are 22 tiny blocks, widening by 2 
stitches at the front edge or toe of the sock. Turn. 

Eighth row. — Purl 4, k 2, * p 2, k 2; repeat from 

* across the row. These two rows of knitting 
form one completed row of blocks. 

Ninth row. — Begin so as to alternate the order of 
the blocks, thus: 

Purl 2, k 2, p 2, k 2, and repeat across the row, 
widening as before. 

Tenth row. — Knit 4, * p 2, k 2, and repeat from 

* to end of row. This completes the second row of 
blocks. 

Now make 3 more rows of similar blocks, widen- 
ing in the same order. Then 4 more rows without 
widening; 3 more rows, widening by 1 stitch at the 
front edge. 

To Make the Instep and Toe. — Pass 36 stitches 
(beginning at the back) on another needle. Then 
make 9 rows of blocks, widening at the toe-edge in 
every row by 2 stitches, regulating the widening so 
that the basket effect of the blocks will not be dis- 
turbed. This forms one-half of the foot. Knit 
the other half of the toe and instep (8 rows more) 
to correspond with the first half, narrowing instead 
of widening. At the last row cast on 36 stitches, 
and work the remainder of the foot to correspond 
with the other side. Double 
the foot together and join it 
at the back and along the 
sole, sewing the toe point 
into the angle under it. Now 
pick up all the stitches around 
the top of the foot portion 
that are not already on the 
needle, and then knit back 
and forth 6 times, thus mak- 
ing 3 rows, and bind off. 

For the Top. — Cast on 79 
stitches. Purl once across, 
and knit back plain. 

Third row. — Purl 2 sep- 
arately, then purl 3 together; 
* purl 3, then purl 3 togeth- 
er, and repeat from * across 
the row until within 2 of 
the end, and purl these 2 separately. 

Fourth row. — Knit 1, th o, k 3, * th o, k 1, th o, 
k 3, and repeat from * across the row. Repeat 
third and fourth rows until the top is 21 holes deep, 
making the last row like the fourth. Now across 
four ribs at each side knit plain, and between the 
plain sections work the same as third row, to 
preserve the uniformity of the ribs. Now knit 
plain again at each side, working between the 
same as in the fourth row. 



Infants' Knitted Sock. 



126 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




No. 28. — Baby's K.sitted 
Bootees. 



Fifth row. — Purl 2, th o twice and p 2 together; 
and repeat to end of plain section. Make open- 
work between. 

Sixth row. — Knit plain at sides, dropping every 

second put-over thread; make open-work between. 

Next two ro7vs. — Knit plain, also knitting plain 

across the next row of 
open-work and the next 
rib at each side. This 
will leave 4 rows of 
open-work and ribs at 
the center of the needle. 
Now bind off 30 
stitches, then knit 
across in open-work 
style until there are 30 
stitches left on the 
needle; bind off the 30, 
leaving the open-work 
on the needle. Join the 
yarn and knit the re- 
mainder of the instep in 
open-work, so that there 
v/ill be 32 holes from 
the top of the sock to 
the lower edge of the 
instep. Then bind off. 
Now sew the top of the sock together at the back, 
and join its lower edge to the foot portion on the 
inside, where the plain knitting around the top 
begins. ' 

Run a cord through the holes in the plain por- 
tion back of the instep, tip it with balls or tassels, 
and tie it in front of the ankle. 

Baby's Knitted Bootees. 

No. 28. — These bootees are knitted with white 
Saxony wool on coarse steel 
needles; they are done in a 
ribbed pattern and finished 
-with a knitted edging turned 
over the top. The scollop 
of the edging and the toe of 
the bootee are ornamented 
in light blue floss-silk. 

Cast on 60 stitches to be- 
gin, and knit to and fro. 
Knit the first 4 rows all to 
appear plain on the right 
•side (aS the work is done to 
and fro, and consequently 
turned at the end of each 
row, one row will be knitted 
plain and the next purled); 
then knit 4 rows to appear 
purled on the right side, then 
4 more plain rows followed 
by 4 more purled rows, mak- 
ing 16 rows. Knit 40 more 

rows (5 ribs) to carry the work to the top; but in 
the 18th row begin the instep. For this take the 
middle 10 stitches on a separate needle, leaving the 
rest aside, and knit 17 rows of the pattern on them, 




No. 29.— Knitted Toque or Toboggan Cap. 



and at the end of each row narrow by knitting the 
last of the middle stitches together with the first of 
the stitches set aside, the narrowed stitch to be 
plain on the right side ; slip the first stitch of every 
row. After completing the 17 rows take up all the 
stitches again, but narrow 7 more times, in each 
succeeding 2nd row, in a straight line above the 
previous narrowings ; in the 34th row and 3 times 
thereafter in each succeeding 2nd row, widen after 
the first stitch from the beginning and before the 
last stitch from the end of the row; (to widen, knit 
2 stitches out of 1, 1 plain and 1 purled). At the 
end of the 56th row cast off the stitches. Fold the 
foundation stitches through the middle and over- 
seam them together on the wrong side ; then over- 
seam the end stitches of the 56 rows. 

For the edging cast on 58 stitches and knit to 
and fro, as follows : 

First row. — "Slip the 1st, k 1, th o, * k 2, n 2 (to 
narrow 2, slip 1, knit the next 2 together, and cast 
off the slipped stitch over the knitted stitch), k 2, 
th o, k 1, th o ; repeat 6 times more from *. Omit 
the last th o at the end. 

Second row. — Purl throughout. 

Repeat the 1st and 2nd rows 3 times more. 

Next knit a plain row, in which narrow 18 
stitches at intervals ; then 4 rows to appear purled 
on the right side, and 3 rows plain on the right 
side, after which cast off, join the ends, and over- 
seam the lace to the bootee. Trim the front with 
silk cord and tassels as illustrated. 

Knitted Toque or Toboggan Cap. 

No. 29. — Use Germantown yarn and work as 
follows : 

For the Crown. — Cast on 42 stitches. Knit plain 
for 120 rows and bind off loosely. Join the two 
ends by an over-and-over 
seam. 

For the Border. — Cast on 
16 stitches and knit until 
you have a piece long enough 
to sew on the crown portion. 
Join its ends, sew it to the 
lower edge of the crown, 
placing the seams together, 
with the border inside the 
crown; then turn the border 
up on the outside to conceal 
the seam. 

Fold the toque so that the 
seam will come at the mid- 
dle. Now lay a box-plait in 
the top, turn the latter down 
for about a finger and fasten 
it under a satin bow at the 
top of the border. 

This toque may be worn 
by adults as well as children, 
and may be made of any color prefered, or of a 
combination of two colors. It may be made to 
match a toboggan suit in colors, and pompons may 
be substituted for the bow. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



127 



Knitted Alpine or Storm Hood. 

No. 30. — The hood here illustrated may be 
made of Germantown wool or four-thread Saxony 
yarn, and is for a child 8 or 10 years of age. In a 
larger size, which may easily be made by increasing 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiigfes 




■ W 





No. 30. — Knitted Alpine or Storm Hood. 

the number of stitches given, the hood is much 
used by gentlemen compelled to travel out of doors 
in severe weather, and is also, worn by them for 
night travelling in winter. 

Children wear this hood under their hats when 
out in frosty weather during play hours, or when 
they are taking long rides or going to school, 
as it covers the throat and ears and protects the 
head generally from the cold. 

The hood may be made in any color preferred, 
and is begun at the neck and knitted as follows: 
Cast on 120 stitches, making 40 on each of 3 
needles. Work round and round, purling 2 and 
knitting 2 alternately for 5 inches. 

For the back of the head work as you would for 
the heel of a stocking, using 70 stitches; the 
stitches that are purled in one row must be knitted 
in the next, and vice versa, to preserve the rib. 
Continue to work backward and forward in ribs 
for 6J^ inches. 

For the Top of Crown. — Cast off 18 stitches at 
each end of the 70 you have been working upon; 
on the stitches which remain continue to work in 
ribbed knitting, picking up a stitch from the cast- 
off stitches, and knitting it together with the last 
stitch of each row; in this way you take up a 
stitch from the right side in one row, and one from 
the left in the next. Continue to work as de- 
scribed until all the side stitches are taken up. 
Then pick up the stitches down each side of the 
6y 2 inches of ribbed knitting, and then work round 
and round, including the 50 stitches left for the 
under-part of chin, knitting 2 and purling 2 alter- 
nately for 2Y2 inches; then bind off. 

The hood is slipped on over the head and fits 
closely about the neck and face. 



Baby's Knitted Drawers. 

No. 31. — These drawers are knitted with German- 
town wool on coarse steel needles. Begin at the 
top, casting on 96 stitches, and work to and fro. 

First to Third rows. — Knit so that all stitches 
will appear purled on the right side. 

Fourth row. — To make a row of holes through 
which to run a ribbon, knit as follows: * Knit 2 
stitches together, put the wool over twice, knit 2 
together crossed; repeat from *. 

Fifth row. — By turns knit 2 and purl 2. 

Sixth to Sixteenth rows. — Knit all stitches so that 
on the same side they will appear the same as in 
the last row. Next make 94 rows of plain knitting; 
then knit up to the middle 24 stitches, and sepa- 
rating them from the rest, knit 126 rows of plain 
knitting on them, but beginning in the 36th row of 
the 126 knit each end-stitch together with the next 
nearest edge stitch of the 94 rows worked pre- 
viously; and when doing this in the 37th row, and 
every second row thereafter to the 59th inclusive, 
increase 1 stitch on both sides; then in the 80th 
row, and every second row after, narrow 1 stitch 
at the same place, so that all the stitches will 
be used up. Then take up the edge stitches at 
the lower edge, and on these, together with those 
left aside before, knit 14 rows of ribbed knitting like 
the 5 th to the 16th rows, after which cast off, and 
join the edge stitches of the first 16 rows from the 
wrong side. 

To Knit a Double Knee to a Stocking. 

(No Illustration.) 

A double knee is very useful in children's stock- 
ings on account of added durability. It is very 
simply done, as follows : Knit as much of the 
stocking as you wish above the knee in the ordi-~ 
nary manner. Then add another thread of yarn 




No. 31. — Baby's Knitted Drawers. 

and knit with the two taken together until the 
knee is as deep as you desire. Then break off the 
second thread and finish the stocking with one 
thread. The heels and toes may be made double, 
using the same yarn or one half as coarse. 



128 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Baby's Knitted Bootees. 

No. t> 2 - — Pink and white Berlin wool and four 
steel needles, No. 14, are used in making these 
little bootees. 

With white wool cast 19 stitches on the first 




No. 32. — Baby's Knitted Bootee. 

needle, 19 on the second, and 18 on the third. 

Knit 2, purl 2, for 28 rounds. 

Twenty-ninth round. — M 1, si 1, k 1, pass the slip- 
ped stitch over the knit one. Repeat. 

Thirtieth round. — The same as the 1st round. 

Continue for 7 more rounds the same, then join on 
the pink wool. Knit and purl each alternate round 
for 8 rounds. Divide 26 stitches for the front, leav- 
ing the other stitches on the two other needles for 
the sole. On the needle with the 26 stitches, knit 
backward and forward in stripes of 3 rows, in 
pink and white wool. In the beginning of the 
fourth white stripe the decrease is begun and 
made by slipping the second stitch, and passing it 
over the knitted one; (at the beginning of each row 
•the first stitch is to be purled to make a ridge in 
picking up the stitches for the sole) ; continue the 
decrease until you have 6 stitches on the needle ; 
then pick up the side stitches to meet those on the 
other needles ; knit and purl alternately 6 rounds, 
then decrease at the back of heel by knitting 2 to- 
gether twice, and at the toe by slipping the second 
stitch over the first at the beginning of each knitted 
round. Continue this for 9 more rounds, divide 
the stitches onto 2 needles, then cast off the stitches 
on both together. A chain is run through the holes 
of the boot, and finished with a small tassel. 

For the top, cast on 75 stitches with the pink wool. 

M 1, si 1 (as if to purl), k 2 together. Repeat. 

The next row is the same; then join on the white 
wool, and work, alternately, 2 rows, pink and white, 
for 13 rows. Cast off, and sew on neatly to the top. 

A Patch, Knitted into a Stocking. 
No. 33. — This plan of mending will be found 
superior to darning, as it is strong and quite im- 
perceptible. Decide what sized patch will be 
required. Cut the stocking carefully across the 



top and bottom of the patch, taking care to cut 
along one row of the knitting. As the stocking is 
knit from the top it will be necessary, if ribbed, to 
begin at the top of the patch. Rip a row or two 
till all the stitches are clear of broken threads. Do 
not break off the threads at each side, but cut them 
in the center. Pick up all the stitches along the 
top of the patch. Now clear the stitches at the 
bottom of the patch. You will have to cut? the 
thread sometimes to get it free of the stitches if the 
stocking is ribbed, but always leave threads at each 
side at least an inch long. Now cut out the patch, 
keeping it about one-half an inch narrower on each 
side than the piece you intend to knit in. Ravel 
this out one-half an inch on each side, leaving the 
ends as they are. Be sure to stop raveling so that 
the sides of the patch will be quite even. Now 
knit backwards and forwards as many rows as you 
have taken away. Turn the stocking wrong side 
out and lay the stitches you have just knit beside 
the stitches you picked up at the bottom of the 
patch and knit them together, as in the heel of a 
stocking. Sew up each side of the patch, keeping 




Patch, Knitted into a Stocking. 



the rows perfectly even, and keeping all the loose 
threads on the wrong side. Take a darning needle 
and run each thread to the right or left of the 
patch. If the stocking is knit plain, you can begin 
at the bottom of the patch and knit up, which is, 
of course, neater, as the join is out of sight, being 
near the top of the stocking. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



129 




No. 34. — Knitted Chest Protector. 



Knitted Chest Protector. 

No. 34. — This chest protector is knitted with 
white zephyr wool and steel needles, and finished 
with an edging in crochet. Begin the work at the 
lower edge of the front, casting on 22 stitches. 

Knit 6 rows in 
plain knitting, 
slipping the 
first stitch at 
the beginning 
of each row, 
and increasing 
by 1 stitch at 
the end of 
each, to do 
which knit 1 
stitch and purl 
1 out of the 
last stitch. Be- 
ginning at the 
7th row, work 
the first 6 and 
the last 6 
stitches in 
each row in 
plain knitting, 
while on the 
rest of the 
stitches alter- 
nately knit 2 and purl 2 to form the block pattern 
shown in the illustration; the blocks are 2 rows 
deep, and in every 3rd row the pattern is changed, 
bringing plain blocks over the purled ones below 
and purled ones over the plain blocks. Work 
from the 7th to the 144th row in this manner, 
always increasing at the end of the row as de- 
scribed above until the 41st row is completed, 
after which neither increase nor decrease to the 
close of the 144th. Having completed the 144th 
row, finish the front in three parts; on the mid- 
dle 16 stitches knit 4 rows in the usual pattern, 
narrowing 1 stitch at the end of each row, then 
cast off; cast off the stitches between the middle 

16 and the outer 20 on each side, and on the 
latter knit 16 rows as in the part below, nar- 
rowing 1 stitch at the inner edge in each of the 
first 14 rows, so that in the last 2 rows only the 6 
plain stitches remain; cast these off on the right 
side, but on the left, to form a tab with 2 button- 
holes, knit 4 rows on the first 3 stitches, then 4 rows 
on the last 3 stitches, after that 6 rows on all 6 
stitches, but in every second row knit the middle 2 
stitches together, so that, in the last row all will be 
used up. Knit the back in the same manner, but 

17 rows shorter than the front; omit the 4 rows on 
trie middle 16 stitches at the top, casting off these 
stitches, and work both shoulders like the right 
shoulder of the front; join the right shoulder to 
that of the front, and provide the left with a 
button. For the crocheted edging work as follows: 
1 single crochet in the next stitch, skip 2, and make 
a picot formed of 5 chain stitches and a single 
crochet in the first one, in the next stitch. Repeat. 

9 



Infants' Knitted Low-Necked Shirt. 

No. 35. — This little shirt is made of Saxony 
yarn and is formed of two sections, which are 
sewed together under the arms. 

To Knit the Back. — Cast on 85 stitches and knit 
back and forth for 61 rows or a space of 5^ inches, 
working as follows: Knit 1, purl 1, knit 1, purl 1, 
and so on across each row. In working back, be 
careful to knit the stitches you purled, and purl 
those you knitted in the last row. This will pre- 
serve the order of the ribs. 

Now take the finer needles and knit 40 rows 
(or T>yi inches). 

Then take the coarser needles and knit 36 rows 
(or 2,% inches). 

In the 33rd row knit and purl 9 stitches, then 
thread over twice, knit 2 together; then knit and 
purl 4 stitches, thread over twice, and knit 2 to- 
gether; work in this way until there are 9 stitches 
left, and work them off in the previous order. In 
working back knit 1 put-over thread and drop the 
other, in each group. This will form holes for the 
ribbon. 

To Make the Front. — Make the front exactly like 
the back, except that after working 1 1 rows on the 
coarse needles for the upper part of the front, you 
divide the work equally on two needles, and knit 
separately on each needle in order to make the 
front opening. 

Now sew up the seams under the arms to within 
an inch and a-half of the top. 

To Make the Sleeve or Shoulder- Portion. — Join 

the wool at the 
outer edge of the 
front, and cro- 
chet a chain of 3 
stitches; 1 dou- 
ble crochet in 
every stitch of 
the knitted por- 
tion (9 in all) ; 
turn, 2 chain, 
then 1 half-dou- 
ble crochet 
around each dou- 
ble crochet un- 
derneath; turn, 3 
chain, 1 double 
crochet in each 
half-double cro- 
chet underneath. 
Work in this or- 
der until there 
are 4 rows of each 
kind, and sew the 
last row to the top of the shirt at the back. Make 
the other sleeve to correspond. 

For the Border. — Finish the top, bottom, arm-hole 
and left side of the front opening with scollops 
formed of 5 double crochets caught down with 
singles so that the scollops will lie flatly. 

Run ribbon in the holes at the top of the shirt, 
and tie it in front. 




Mm 

m 



;:.".'■■ 



alii 



in 

HIS 



No. 35, 



-Infants' Knitted Low- 
Necked Shirt. 



130 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Child's Jersey Cap. 

No. 36. — This cap is very simply and easily 
made, and is knitted from Berlin wool or Saxony 
yarn on No. 9 bone or wooden needles. 

Cast on 108 stitches. Then knit a row and purl 




No. 36. — Child's Jersey Cap. 

a row until your work measures about 5 inches; 
then double it and knit the stitches that were first 
cast on with the stitches now on the needle, so as 
to form the hem. Still keep knitting a row and 
purling a row until you have made 10 inches in all; 
then cast off, and sew up the top and back very 
neatly, gathering the top in a little. Crochet a 
cord, leaving two ends on which two balls 
are tied. Work a small flower in the front. To 
make wool balls see illustrations on page 54. 

Infants' Knitted Socks. 

No. 37. — For the Foot-Portion of the Sock. — 
Cast on 36 stitches, and knit across 6 times to 
make 3 ridges, widening every other time across 
at the back only. In the next 6 ridges narrow at 
the front edge in every row or every other time 
across. 

In the next 3 ridges widen at the front edge. 
The last time across (in the last of the 3 ridges) 
working from the back, knit 27 stitches; then take 
another needle and knit off the rest of the stitches 
to begin the instep. Now knit across 7 times, 
widening every other time at the front or toe-edge. 
(There will now be 14 stitches on the needle.) 
Now knit back and forth 13 times, or until there 
are 10 ridges across the open space; now narrow 
every other time across until there are 13 ridges for 
the instep. Then cast on 27 stitches and finish the 
remaining half of the foot to correspond with the 
first half, binding off the stitches of the last row. 

Now with the needle on which there are still 27 
stitches, pick up the stitches across the instep and 
the other side of the foot, knit across twice and 
bind off. 

For the Upper Portion. — Pick up 14 stitches 
across the instep, picking them up on the wrong 



side of the work under the edge-finish, and purl 1 row. 

For the Fancy Stripe and the Basket Stripe. — Knit 
5 for the fancy stripe. Knit 2 and purl 2 for the 
basket stripe; knit 5 for the fancy stripe. This 
forms the first row of the instep. 

Second row. — Purl 1, * thread over, purl 1, and 
repeat 3 times more from * for the fancy stripe. 
Knit 2, purl 2 for the basket stripe. Repeat for 
fancy stripe. 

Third row. — Knit 2 together, knit 5 plain, knit 2 
together for the fancy stripe. Purl 2, knit 2 for the 
basket stripe; and repeat fancy stripe. 

Fourth row. — Purl 2 together, purl 3 separately, 
purl 2 together for fancy stripe. Purl 2, k 2 for 
the basket stripe and repeat fancy stripe. 

Now repeat from first row until there are 3 holes, 
one over the other, or 12 rows of knitting; fasten 
the yarn and break it off. Begin at the back edge 
of the foot fastening on the white yarn, and, hold- 
ing the right side toward you, pick up 20 stitches 
along the inside of one side-edge, slipping the 
needle downward through the crosswise threads of 
the stitches, and pulling the white yarn up through 
each, much after the manner of crochet. Now 
knit across the instep as follows: Purl 2 together, 
purl 3 separately, purl 2 together for the fancy 
stripe. Furl 2, knit 2 for the basket stripe, and re- 
peat the fancy stripe once more. Now pick up the 
remaining 20 stitches the same as at the other side 
(there will now be 54 stitches on the needle), and 
purl back and forth 3 times. Now knit back and 
forth 3 times, and then knit as follows to make 
the holes for the cord and balls: Purl 1, thread 
over twice, purl 2 together, * thread over twice, 
purl 2 together, and repeat from * to end of row. 




No. 37.— Infants' Kbitted Sock. 

In working back, knit 2, purl 1, knit 2, purl 1, and 
continue thus across the work. 

Now, knit back and forth plain, once; then purl 
3 times across. This brings the work to the ankle. 

There are six fancy and six basket stripes in the 
leg portion of the sock, and they are knitted by the 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



131 



same directions as those given for the similar stripes 
over the instep. A basket stripe comes at the 
back of the leg, one half of it being knitted at each 
end of the needle; and in knitting this stripe, be 
careful to knit so that the blocks will alternate as in 
a whole stripe. Knit until the leg has 9 holes one 




No. 38. — Babies' Knitted Sack. 

•over the other in the fancy stripes; then knit back 
and forth 4 times and bind off. Now sew the sock 
together down the back, along the sole and across 
the toe. Run a cord into the holes made for it at 
the ankle, and finish it with balls or tassels. 

Blue and white Saxony yarn were used for this 
sock, but any other combination of colors preferred 
may be used, or any color alone may be selected. 

Babies' Knitted Sack. 

No. 38. — This little sack is made of 4-thread 
Saxony yarn in white and pale-blue, and is formed 
in one section and joined under the arms and 
along the sleeves. 

Cast on 70 stitches with the white wool for the 
lower edge of the back, and knit back and forth 
until there are 33 ridges. (Two rows of knitting 
make a ridge.) Now at each side of this center- 
piece cast on 35 stitches and knit until there are 
19 more ridges. Then knit back 55 stitches at one 
side ; take another needle and bind off 29 stitches ; 
knit off the remaining stitches on the needle. Knit 
at each side, 6 ridges ; then cast on 18 stitches and 
knit 19 ridges ; then bind off 35 stitches for each 
sleeve, knit 33 ridges for each front, and bind off 
across the bottom. Sew up the garment under the 
arms and along the sleeves. Now, with the blue 
yarn, pick up the stitches across the bottom, and 
knit across once. 

Now knit 2, th o twice, n ; then knit plain until 
within 3 stitches from the end ; th o twice, n, k 1. 
In knitting back, k 3, p 1 and knit plain until 
within 3 stitches of the end ; then p 1, k 1. 

Knit in this way until there are 9 ridges, then 



pick up the stitches along each front, beginning at 
the bottom, and knit back plain. 

Now knit 1, th o, n, and knit plain to the top of 
the sack. Knit back plain to within 2 of the end ; 
then p 1, k 1. 

Knit in this manner until there are 9 ridges, and 
overhand the slanting corners of the border to- 
gether. 

Now pick up the stitches across the neck and 
border, and knit 5 ridges. Then knit 6 stitches, 
th o twice, n ; * k 7, th o twice, n, and repeat from 
* across the work. In working back drop the last 
half of every put-over thread. 

Now knit 10 more plain ridges, and bind off. Run 
ribbon in the holes to tie the garment about the neck. 

Infant's Mittens. 

No. 39. — Cast on 36 stitches with colored wool, 
dividing the stitches onto 3 needles; then work thus, 
knitting 2 and purling 2 for 20 rounds; then purl 1 
round; next round knit 2, make 2, knit 2 together, 
next round purl, taking care to purl the made 
stitch as 1, and not as 2. Next with white wool 
knit 1 plain round; then knit 10 rounds, purling and 
knitting alternately, taking care that the stitch that 
was plain in one round is purled in the next, thus 
making a pretty spotted pattern; then work back- 
wards and forwards 14 rows; this leaves a space 
open between 2 of the needles where the thumb is 
to be sewn in; then work 10 rounds as before by 
drawing the two end needles together. 

Eleventh round. — Purl or knit plain 2 stitches to- 
gether, so as 
not to disturb 
the pattern, 
and work till 
you come to 
the middle 4 
stitches on the 
center needle; 
then purl or 
knit 2 togeth- 
er twice, and 
work to the 
end of the next 
needle, and 
decreas e 
again; then 
work 3 rounds 
more and de- 
crease again in 
the same way; 
work 2 rounds 
more and de- 
crease again; 
work 1 round 
and decrease 
again. There 
will now be 20 

stitches in all; divide onto 2 needles, 10 on each 
and cast off; then turn the mitten and sew together, 
this being much easier done than turning the mit- 
ten with the needle in it to cast off. 




No. 39. — Infant's Mitten. 



132 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



For the thumb, begin with i stitch, and increase 
i stitch at the end of every row till you have 14 
stitches on the needle, taking care to keep the pat- 
tern by knitting and purling alternately. 

Fifteenth row. — Knit 10, turn the needles round, 
slip 1 and knit 5; turn the needles round again, 
slip 1, and work to the end; then work 1 row, knit- 
ting and purling; next row, decrease by knitting or 
purling 2 together twice in the center of the row; 
work 3 rows and decrease again; work 2 rows and 
decrease again; work 1 row and cast off. Next 
sew the thumb neatly together and into the mitten. 
The point of the thumb began with 1 stitch coming 
to the bottom of the hole for the thumb; this of 
course must be done on the inside of the mitten; 
next crochet a chain about 14 inches long to run 
through the holes round the wrist ; fasten a 
tassel to each end, and 
the mitten is finished. 



Baby's Knitted Socks. 

No. 40. — This pretty 
little sock is made of 
pink. and white Saxony 
yarn. 

Cast on 62 stitches 
with the pink yarn, by 
method No. 1, and knit 
across plain. 

First row. — Knit 1 , th 
o, k 2, * n, n, k 2, th o, 
k 1, th o, k 2, and repeat 
from * across the work. 
Purl back. Repeat these 
2 rows until the scollop 
is 4 holes deep. 

For the 5th row of 
holes: K 1, th o, * nar- 
row 4 times in success- 
ion, th o, k 1, th o, and 
repeat from * across the 
row. 

Next, knit 1 row and 
purl 1 row, and join on 
the white wool. 

Next row. — K 1, * th 
o, n, and repeat from * 

across the work, ending with k 1. This makes a 
new row of holes. 

Next row. — K 1, p 1, and repeat across the row. 
Now make 7 more rows like this row, making the 
knitted stitches in each row come over the purled 
ones of the preceding row, and the purled stitches 
over the knitted ones. Next make another row of 
holes like the last ones, and repeat the holes and 
solid portions until there are 5 rows of holes and 4 
solid rows. 

After making the last row of holes, purl back 
and break off the yarn, leaving it quite long. Now 
slip the 1 st 16 stitches onto a piece of thread or 
yarn; join the yarn again, then knit and purl alter- 
nately the next 15 stitches, and slip the remaining 
stitches onto another thread. Knit back and forth 




across the center, the same as in the solid rows: 
above, 29 times more; then knit once across plain. 
Now pick up the stitches on the 1st thread, and 
17 stitches along the side of the instep; slip the 
toe-stitches onto the same needle, pick up 17 along 
the other side of the instep and finally slip those 
on the remaining thread onto the needle. Join the 
white wool to the end that was broken off and knit 
across plain, once. Then join on the pink wool and 
knit plain n times across, or until there are 5^ ribs. 
In the next row, at each end and at the center of the 
toe, narrow once. This completes the 6th rib. 
Next ro7£>. — Knit plain. 

Next row. — Narrow at each end and twice at the 
middle of the toe. 

Next row. — Knit plain. 

Next row. — Narrow at each end and once at 
the middle of toe. 
Next row. — Knit plain. 
Next row. — Narrow at 
each end and once at 
the middle. 

Next row. — Knit 
plain. 

Ne xt row . — Knit 
plain, narrowing at each 
end, and then bind off. 
Sew up the sock and 
insert a narrow ribbon at 
the top, as seen in the 
picture. 



No. 40. — Baby's Knitted Sock. 



Knitted Veil for an 
Infant. 

(No Illustration.) 

Cream-white Shetland 
wool and a pair of bone 
needles of medium size 
will be needed in mak- 
ing this veil. 

Cast on 203 stitches. 
Knit across and seam 
back, and then begin 
the design. 

First row. — K 2 plain,, 
* n, 3 plain, m 1, 1 plain, 
m 1, 3 plain, n *; repeat 
from star to star till end 
of row, except last 2 stitches, which are knit plain. 
Second row. — Purl. 
Third row. — Like the 1st. 
Fourth row. — Like the 2nd. 

Repeat these 4 rows till the border is 5 inches deep.. 
The upper part of the veil is knitted as follows: 
First row. — All plain. 
Second row. — All seam. 

Third row. — 1 plain, narrow till only 1 stitch is 
left; knit that plain. 

Fourth row. — Knit plain, picking up the loop 
where the 2 were knit together, and the stitches 
before each 2. Be sure to have 203 stitches before 
beginning the next row. 

Repeat the last 4 rows till the veil is long; 
enough. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



133 



Infants' Knitted Jacket. 

No. 41. — This jacket is a most useful little gar- 
ment for infants to wear under cloaks, or even 
under robes in very cold weather. 

Commence at the bottom; cast 94 stitches on one 
needle. 

First row. — Knit. 

Second row. — Knit 2, purl 2 throughout the row. 




No. 41. — Infants' Knitted Jacket. 

These 2 rows are repeated 9 times more. 

Twenty- first row. — Knit 1, * th o, knit 2 together; 
repeat from * to end of row, knitting the last stitch. 

Twenty-second row. — Knit. 

Twenty-third row. — Knit 14; knit 1 and purl 1 in 
the next stitch; knit 24; knit 1 and purl one in the 
Tiext stitch; repeat from the beginning of the row 
once more; end with knit 14. 

Twenty-fourth row. — Knit. 

Twenty-fifth row. — Like 23d row, with the excep- 
tion that you knit 15 instead of 14, as mentioned in 
23d row. 

Twenty-sixth row. — Knit; continue to increase 
"with a plain row between until you have increased 
9 times in all; then increase only in the back, until 
you have increased at the back in all 13 times; now 
work 4 rows on all the stitches. 

Now for the Right front. — Work on 35 stitches. 

First to Tenth rows. — Knit. 

Eleventh row. — Leave 8 stitches on another 
needle, and for the shoulder on the remainder of the 
stitches, knit 2 together, knit to end of row in each 
alternate row for 5 times; (the intermediate rows are 
plain); knit 10 rows without decrease, then cast off. 

Work the other shoulder in the same way as 
described for this. Take 13 stitches from each 
side of back stitches; work on the remaining 42 
stitches 10 rows, then decrease at the beginning 
and end of each alternate row for 18 rows more, 
sew up the shoulders, pick up 1 stitch at the end of 
each ridge of both fronts, and knit across in a row 
with the 24 stitches of the back to form the neck. 

First row. — Knit. 

Second roiv. — Wool forward, knit 2 together 



throughout; repeat the 1st row 3 times more, 
then cast off. 

For the Sleeve. — Commence at the wrist; cast on 
27 stitches. 

First row. — Knit. 

Second to Twentieth rows. — Knit 2, purl 2 through- 
out. 

Twenty-first row. — Knit 1 and purl 1 in the first 
stitch ; knit 25, knit 1 and purl 1 in the last stitch. 

Twenty-second to Twenty-sixth rows. — Knit; repeat 
from the 21st row 5 times more ; work 8 more rows 
without increase, then cast off ; sew up the sleevec, 
and sew into the armholes. Run ribbon into the 
holes at the neck and waist and tie. 

Infants' Knitted Boots. 

No. 42. — This little boot is made of Saxony 
yarn on two knitting needles. It is very simply 
and quickly made, being sewed up the front from 
the toe to the top of the ribbed knitting, and is 
also slightly gathered at the heel and toe to shape 
it and draw the sole to the right length. 

Begin at the sole, casting on 144 stitches. Work 
in patent knitting thus : * Th o, si 1, k 2 together 
and repeat from * across the work, knitting one at 
the end. Work back and forth in this manner for 
an inch and a-quarter. 

Now begin the decrease as follows : 

First row. — *Th o, si 1, k 2 together and repeat 
from * 3 times more. Th o, si 1, k 2 together, pass 
slipped stitch over, k 3 together and continue in 
patent knitting to the end of the row. Repeat this 
row until you have worked 3 inches, measuring 
from the bottom of the boot. 

To make the ankle, which is worked in ribbed 
knitting : 

First row. — K 1, p 2 together, and repeat across 
the row. 

Next row. — K i, p 1, and repeat across the row, 
and repeat this 
row until you 
have 2 inches 
more, being care- 
ful to preserve the 
ribbed effect by 
reversing the or- 
der of the stitches 
in knitting back. 

For the Top of 
the Leg. — To in- 
crease the num- 
berof stitchessuf- 
ficiently: Th o, 
k i, and repeat 
across the row. 
Then work in 
patent knitting 

for an inch and a-half and cast off. Turn this por- 
tion down, as seen in the engraving. 

For the Edge of the Turned-Down Portion, — 
Crochet * 1 d c into a stitch of the knitting, skip 1; 
2 trebles, 2 chain, 2 trebles in next stitch; skip 1 
and repeat from * around the work. Sew a ribbon 
bow to the top of the ankle, as seen in the picture. 




No. 42. — Infants' Knitted Boot. 



134 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Infants' Knitted Boots. 

No. 43. — Use Saxony yarn and four steel needles 
of suitable size. Commence at the top of leg, cast 
loosely 40 stitches on 3 needles, that is 14 on 
each of 2, and 12 on the 3rd. 

First and Second rounds. — Knit plain. 

Third round. — Bring the wool forward, knit 1 in 
the front, 1 at the back, and again 1 in the front of 
next stitch, making 3 stitches in 1 ; put the 3 
stitches back on the left-hand needle, knit them, 
put them a second time back, and knit them; bring 
the wool forward, knit 3; repeat from the beginning 
of the round. 

Fourth round. — Knit. 

Fifth round. — Cast off 4, knit 3; you will now 
have 4 stitches on the right-hand 
needle; repeat from the beginning 
of the round. 

Sixth round. — Knit plain. 

Seventh round.— Knit 2 before 
beginning the raised pattern as 
described in the third round; this 
makes the patterns lie between 
those of the third round; end the 
round with wool forward, knit 1. 
Continue to work as described, un- 
til you have 9 raised patterns in a 
diagonal line. 

For thenext round, knit 5, make 

1 by bringing the wool forward; 
repeat; this increases the number 
of stitches to 47 in the round. 

For the ankle, knit 22 rounds 
plain. ' 

For the heel: 

First row. — Knit 28, turn. 

Second row. — Knit 1, purl 26, 
knit 1. 

Repeat these 2 rows until you 
have worked 18 rows. 

Ninetee7ith to Twenty- second row. 
— Knit; this forms 2 purl ridges. 

Twenty-third row. — Knit 19 and 
then turn the work. 

Twenty-fourth row. — Knit 10, 
this leaves 9 stitches each side of 
heel. Turn and knit back. 

Twenty-fifth row. — Knit 9, knit the next stitch, 
and 1 of the side stitches together; turn and re- 
peat this last row until all the side stitches are 
worked in, leaving 10 stitches only on the heel 
needle. 

Now pick up 13 stitches down each side of heel, 
turn and work back on the heel, (with the right 
side of the work towards you) and so on around 
for 24 rounds. 

Twenty-fifth round.- — Knit the stitches for top of 
foot, knit 5, knit 2 together, knit 22, knit 2 together, 
knit 5; knit 3 rounds without decrease. 

In the next round decrease again at the same 
places, but there will be only 20 stitches between the 

2 decreases this time; continue to decrease 4 times 
more with 3 plain rounds between each decreas- 




ing round; then at the top knit i,purl 1 across (for 
the remainder of t'.ie boot) reversing the stitches in 
each alternate round, but continuing the decreas- 
ings at sole for another 4 times, making in all 10 
decreasings on each side. Turn the boot inside 
out, put 2 stitches from each side of sole stitches 
to the top stitches; knit together, 1 stitch from the 
top, and 1 stitch from the sole, then 2 from the 
top and 1 from the sole (casting off each time) 
across the whole stitches, until there are left but 1 
at top and 1 at bottom; knit these 2 together, and 
cast them off. 

For the crocheted trimming round the top, work 
with wool as follows: 

First round. — One double into a stitch, 1 chain, 
pass over 1 stitch, 3 trebles each separated by 1 
chain into next stitch, 1 chain, pass 
over 1 stitch and repeat all round. 
- Second round. — With silk : 1 dou- 
ble into each stitch. 

For the line below the scollops, 
with silk, work 1 double into each 
stitch. 

For the rosette, with silk, make 
a chain of 14 stitches, turn, work 
1 double, 3 trebles, and 1 double 
into each of 3 stitches, 1 double, 4 
trebles, and 1 double into each of 
4 stitches, 1 double, 5 trebles, and 
1 double into each of 5 stitches. 
Roll the work round, with the 
smallest scollops in the center, 
sew securely at the back of work,, 
and sew to the toe of boot. The 
ribbon round the ankle is sewn to 
the boot at the back, and is tied in 
front. 

Baby's Knitted Shirt. 

(For Illustration see next Page.) 

No. 44. — This shirt is made of 
Saxony yarn and is in one piece 
which is sewed together under the 
arms. 

To Knit the Back. — Cast on 73 
stitches for the lower edge, and 
work back and forth 58 times or 
until you have a piece 4^ inches 
deep. Work as follows: Knit 1, seam 1, knit 1, 
seam r, each time across, being careful in coming 
back to knit the stitches you seamed and seam those 
you knitted in working the last row. This will pre- 
serve the ribs in regular order. 

Now knit the work off onto finer needles and 
make 35 rows (or 2^ inches.) Then knit the work 
back onto the original needles and make 34 rows 
(or about 3 inches); but in the 31st row of this last 
section, and beginning at the 21st stitch, put the 
thread over twice and knit 2 together ; knit 4 
stitches, th o twice, and knit 2 together ; repeat 
this until there are 20 stitches left on the needle 
and then finish the row plain. In working back, 
drop the put-over threads, This will form holes for 
the ribbon. Begin the 35th row and knit and purl 



Infants' Knitted Boot. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



135 




No. 44. — Baby's Knitted Shirt. 
(For Description see this and preceding Page.) 



23 stitches; then cast off the center stitches for the 
neck until there are 23 left on the needle. 

Now on the last 23 stitches knit 14 rows, making 
the holes for the ribbon along the neck edge, in 
every 3rd row, 3 stitches from the end, to correspond 
with those across the back. Now cast on, or add 

to the 20 you are 
working on, 15 
more stitches, 
and knit 3 rows. 
Then make the 
ribbon-holes as 
across the back, 
and work until 
there are 22 
rows counting 
from the added 
stitches. This 
will form the 
shoulder and 
front. 

Now begin at 
the 20 stitches 
left on the nee- 
dle at the other 
side of the work, and knit the shoulder and upper 
part of the front exactly the same as the side just 
completed. 

Now slip all the stitches onto one needle. Then 
take the fine needles and knit 35 rows (or 2% 
inches), and complete the lower part of the front to 
correspond with that of the back. Sew the section 
together under the arms, from the lower edge to the 
top of the fine knitting, leaving the rest for the 
arm-holes. 

To Knit the Sleeves. — Cast on 61 stitches for each, 
and with the coarse needles knit 53 rows or 4^ 
inches, and with the finer ones 24 rows or 1% 
inch. Sew up the sleeves and sew them in. 

For the Border. — Edge the neck, bottom, wrists 
and the right-side edge of the opening in the front 
with crocheted .scollops made as follows: 6 double 
crochets, caught down with single crochets so that 
they will lie flatly. Finish the other edge of the 
opening with single crochets. Run ribbon in the 
holes at the top and tie it to draw it in to the neck. 
A shirt of this kind may be knitted in any size 
required for an infant, child or adult, by simply 
casting on fewer or more stitches to begin the work 
and making the number of rows or inches less or 
greater according to the size desired. Plain shirts 
of this kind are often completed with a deep border 
at the bottom, of fancy knitting or of crochet. 

Knitted Stockings for a Girl from 6 to 8 
Years Old. 

No. 45. — This stocking is knitted with black or 
dark colored silk, partly in plain, partly in ribbed 
and fancy knitting. 

Cast on 104 stitches, and work the first eight 
rounds, in plain knitting ; in the 9th round, alter- 
nately, th o and k 2 together, then knit eight more 
plain rounds. For the 18th round take up the 
stitches originally cast on on another set of 



needles, and knit off the stitches in pairs, forming 
the double notched edge at the top of the stock- 
ing. Work the 19th to the 96th rounds plain 
throughout. In the next round set off the middle 
40 stitches on which to knit the fancy pattern on 
the middle of the front and instep, the rest of the 
stitches being in ribbed knitting. Work as follows: 
Hinety-seventh round. — On the 32 stitches before 
the middle 40, alternately knit 2 and purl 2 eight 
times ; then th o, k 2 together ; twice p 2 together ; 
then * 4 times alternately th o and k 1; then 4 
times p 2 together; repeat from * twice, but in the last 
repetition, only p 2 together twice instead of 4 times, 
then th o, k 2 together; then for the ribbed knitting 
on the next 32 stitches, p 2 and k 2 eight times. 

Ninety-eighth and Ninety-ninth rounds. — Eight 
times alternately p 2 and k 2 ; k the next 40, then 
eight times p 2 and k 2. 

One Hundredth to One Hundred and Third rounds. 
— Work as in the preceding round, but in the 100th 
knit together the first 2 and the last 2 stitches, pre- 
viously putting the thread around the needle. 

Repeat the 97th to 103rd rounds until the leg is 
long enough (^^ repetitions in the model), but in 
the last two rounds of the nth, 15th, 19th, and 
24th repetitions knit together the first 2 and last 2 
stitches as in the 100th round, so that the number 
of stitches will be decreased by 4 in each of these 
patterns without breaking in on the ribbed knit- 
ting. Take the 22 stitches on each side of the 
middle of the back for the heel, and work 36 rows 
forward and back, one plain 
and one purled alternately, 
seaming the middle and the 
end stitches on each side. Slip 
the first stitch in every row, 
and knit until there are 18 
loops at each side; leave off 
with a purled row. In the next 
row * k to the 5 th stitch past 
the seam (which is now dis- 
continued), slip the 5 th, k the 
next and pass the slipped stitch 
over it, k the next, turn, slip 
the ikst stitch and p to the 5th 
past the seam, slip that, p the 
next stitch and pass the slipped 
stitch over it, p the next stitch 
and turn again ; repeat from 
*, always slipping the first 
stitch on the other side of the 
opening formed, until all the 
stitches are knitted off from 
v$&r each side. Pickup the 18 loops 

on the left side of the heel, 
knitting each as picked up; 
knit around the stocking to the 
18 loops on the other side, and 
pick up these also, knitting 
them for the gussets; narrow by 1 stitch at the 
side of the 18 stitches picked up, in every 3rd 
round, until there are 8 narrowings on each side. 
Knit the stitches on the instep in the fancy pattern, 
and the rest plain, narrowing down to the toe. 




No. 45. — Knitted 

Stocking for a Girl 

from 6 to 8 Tears 

Old. 



136 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Babies' Knitted Bootees. 

No. 46. — This dainty little affair is made of 
white split zephyr and salmon-colored silk. 

For the Foot. — Cast on 25 stitches and knit back 
and forth, widening alternately in the rows at the 
front and back until there are 5 ridges ; then knit 
12 more ridges, widening at the front only. 

In working back from the last row, narrow 1 




No. 46. — Babies' Knitted Bootee. 



stitch at the front, and knit across. Now bind off 
27 stitches. Then knit 2 ridges, widening at the 
toe-edge in each ridge. Now make 3 ridges, nar- 
rowing in each at the toe-edge. Next make 4 
ridges, widening in each at the toe-edge ; and then 
5 ridges, widening in each row. Then make 5 
ridges, narrowing in each row at the toe ; and 4 
more, narrowing in each ridge. Knit 3 ridges, 
widening in each at the toe. Now cast on 27 
stitches, and knit the remainder to correspond with 
the first side. Bind off the stitches, and sew up 
the foot along the sole and toe. 

To Knit the Top. — Cast on 25 stitches and knit 4 
ridges, and then at each side cast on 28 stitches 
and knit 9 ridges. Now to make the holes, knit 3 
stitches, th o, n, * k 4, th o, n, and repeat from * 
across the row. Knit back, and make 18 more 
ridges. 

For the Fancy Portion. — P 1, * k 2 together, k 2 
plain, th o, k 1, th o, k 2, k 2 together, p 1, and re- 
peat from * across the row. 

Next row. — K 1, p 9, k 1, p 9, and repeat across 
the row. 

Repeat these two rows until there are 8 holes. 
Sew the section up at the back. 

For the Border. — With the silk make 1 single 
crochet at one side of a scollop, then 12 doubles 
and another single ; then 1 long double down be- 
tween the scollops, as seen in the picture. 

Sew the top and foot together by an over-and- 
over stitch, and then conceal the joining by short 
and long button-hole stitches of the silk. Run rib- 
bon in the holes and tie it in front. Fasten a tiny 
bow of the same over the toe of the bootee, and 
turn the top down as seen in the picture. 



3 rows on 



Child's Knitted Under-Drawers. 

No. 47. — These drawers are for a child from 2 
to 4 years of age and are made from Saxony yarn 
with No. 10 needles, in one design throughout. 

Begin at the bottom of the leg. Cast on 64 
stitches. 

First row. — Knit. 

Second row. — Purl. 

Third, Fourth and Fifth rows. — Knit. 

This forms a rib across the work, of 
one side and one on the other side. 

Now repeat from the 2nd row 12 times more, 
which will make 52 rows in all. In the 6th and 7th 
rows, increase 1 stitch at the beginning of each row. 

Next knit 4 rows without increasing; then 2 
rows, increasing 1 at the beginning of each. 
Repeat the 4 plain rows and the 2 increased 
rows alternately until $6 rows are worked. Then 
increase at the beginning of every following row 
until the 52nd row is completed. This forms 
one leg. 

Knit another section like the first, and when 
completed turn or hold the work so that the 
thread will be at the right-hand side; then slip the 
stitches of the other section onto the same needle, 
at the left-hand side. Now knit across, knitting 
the two adjoining stitches of the sections together. 

In the second (next) row, knit without any de- 
crease; in the third row, knit 2 together at each 
side of the center stitch. Repeat these 2 rows 3 
times more. After this knit plain in the middle 
and decrease at the beginning of every 3rd and 
4th row. Work in this way until there are 50 rows 
above the joining, binding off the last row. Sew 




No. 47. — Child's Knitted Undee-Drawees. 



up the legs. Now take a crochet hook and work 
across the top as follows: 

First row. — Treble crochets with single chains 
between. 

Second and Third rows. — 1 double crochet in 
every stitch. 

Fourth row. — 1 double, * 3 ch., skip 2 doubles, 
1 double in the next and repeat from *. 

Edge for the Legs. — Make to correspond with the 
top. Run a ribbon m the top and tie it at the 
back. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



137 



Silk Socks for a Child Two Years Old. 

(No Illustration.) 

To knit these socks use 4 No. 16 needles, and 
2-fold knitting silk. 

Cast 33 stitches onto each of 2 needles and 30 
onto 1, and knit in rib pattern thus: 2 purl, 2 
plain. Knit to a depth of 6^£ inches, and then 
divide for the heel as follows: Take half the num- 
ber of stitches and 8 more (or 56 stitches). Knit 
back and forth, for a depth of 1^ inches in ribs. 
(In working back reverse the details in order to 
preserve the rib-effect.) Now knit plain and nar- 
row at each side of the center stitch for 1 row. 
Then purl a row. Make 2 more rows narrowed at 
the center with an extra row between, and cast off. 
Double the heel together and sew it along the cast- 
off stitches. This forms the "manufacturers' heel." 

Next take up 52 stitches on the side of the heel 
for the under part of the foot and knit this plain; 
rib the top part. Narrow the underpart on each 
side in the 4th, 7th, 10th, 13th and 16th rows; then 
knit until your work measures from the heel where 
you have taken up the stitches, 2^ inches. Then 
begin the narrowings for the toe — one on each side 
of the front and back part, always in the 2nd and 
3rd stitches. Knit 3 plain rounds between the first 
2 narrowed rounds, 2 plain rounds between the next 
2 narrowed rounds, and 1 plain round between the 
remaining narrowed rounds. When the stitches are 
reduced to about 58 in number, cast off and sew 
the edges together. 

To Strengthen the Knee of a Child's 
Stocking while Knitting It. 

An excellent plan for strengthening the knee 
of a child's stocking is to have a second ball 
and knit every second row double across the front 
of the knee, breaking off the wool at the end of each 
double row. If you leave about an inch of wool 
at the beginning and end of each double row, it 
will not require to be fastened, and will never ap- 
pear on the right side. A diamond-shaped double- 
piece is all that is necessary, and does not make 
the stocking clumsy under the knee. It is formed 
thus : When you have knit to the knee, knit almost 
half round the stocking, counting from the seam 
stitch. Now knit a few stitches double. Break off 
the wool and finish the row. Next row plain. In 
the next row, knit' about six more double stitches, 
taking care to keep them exactly in the centre of the 
stocking. Proceed in this way till about half the 
width is double. Knit a few rows without increas- 
ing the number of double stitches, then decrease 
their number gradually till only a few remain, 
and cease the double-knitting altogether. A patch 
knitted into a stocking may easily be made double, 
but need not be shaped. 

Knitted Cross-Over for a Child. 

(No Illustration.) 

A cross-over for a child of 6 years is easily knit- 



ted of single Berlin or Germantown wool on bone 
needles. First take the length of the little girl's 
back, from her neck to her waist, then cast on 10 
stitches and knit a piece the length of her back, 
increasing at the beginning of every row thus: 
Wool over the needle, knit (not slip) the next stitch; 
(this forms a sort of open edge, which, when the 
crossover is quite completed, is secured by 2 rows 
of double crochets the whole way round, working 
3 doubles in one at all the corners) ; knit plain to 
the end. 

Every row is the same until you have knitted the 
depth of the child's back; then divide your stitches 
into 3 parts, and knit off the first part plain. Take 
your third needle and cast off the middle set of 
stitches. This is for the back of the neck. Leave 
the first set of stitches on the first needle, now knit 
the remaining set of stitches for 20 rows, and then 
knit every row plain, decreasing 1 stitch at the 
beginning of each row, always at the neck end, by 
knitting the first 2 together, until only 2 stitches 
remain, and you have knitted, in fact, to a point. 

Do precisely the same on the other side to form 
the other front, and sew a ribbon on each point. 
After you have made 2 rows of double crochets 
the whole way round, knot in a pretty fringe by 
taking two strands of the wool about 8 inches in 
length, and doubling them for each knotting. Slip 
the doubled part through the space for it and pass 
the cut ends through the doubled end, drawing 
the loop tightly. 

Baby's Knitted Petticoat, with Bodice. 

(No Illustration.) 

This little garment may be made from German- 
town wool with No. 8 needles. Two colors may 
be used, according to the directions given below. 

It is begun at the bottom and has an open work 
pointed edge, with imitation tucks in color. It is 
made in 2 pieces as follows : 

For one section of the garment, cast on, in color, 
112 stitches, and then work 1 row plain, 1 row 
purl, 1 row plain. Then with white wool * k 1, 
k 2 together, k 3, wool forward, k 1, wool forward, 
k 3, si 1, k 1, pass the slip stitch over ; repeat from 
* across the row and purl back. Repeat these 2 
rows 4 times. Then, in color, knit 2 plain rows, 1 
purl, 1 plain. Continue the fancy pattern in white, 
and the pink tucks till there are 5 of the latter. 
Then knit in white, in the fancy stitch, till there 
are 10 of the open-work rows, decreasing by put- 
ting 2 plain stitches in the fancy pattern where the 

3 were ; then decrease here and there till the 
stitches are reduced to 56. This completes the skirt 
part. Then rib the 56 stitches. Now work 4 plain, 

4 purl, for 56 rows, for the body, and cast off. 
Make another piece of knitting just the same, only 
adding a strap for the shoulders at the beginning 
and end of the 56 stitches, making it 12 stitches 
wide and 20 rows long. Cast off the middle stitches, 
sew up the sides, and join the ends of the straps on 
to the top of the other piece. Finish with a crochet 
edging for the neck and arms and run in a string. 



138 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Doll$, ^eiN^, 8 ALL S> et(., for (hilD^gn. 



Knitted Harlequin. 



the outer side of the needles, 6 stitches are in- 
creased again in the middle of the needle for the 
No. i. — Berlin wool in green and black, flesh- chin, then decreased again so much, that when the 
color, scarlet, olive-green, white and yellow will be work is as long as the back part of the head made 
needed in knitting this harlequin. before, 10 stitches may remain on each needle. 

These illustrations represent a comical knitted The neck is next knitted in 14 rounds with 



harlequin which would 
make a charming pres- 
ent for a little boy or girl. 
It is 2> 2 }i inches tall, and 
will not be difficult to 
make for those who are 
very good knitters, after 
the stitches are given; 
but a detailed descrip- 
tion, with the exact 
number of stitches re- 
quired for the use of in- 
experienced knitters, 
could not be given for 
the want of space. The 
worker must begin the 
harlequin at the grey 
pointed cap, for which 
(without the brim), 60 
stitches must be cast on 
and divided evenly on 
4 needles. After a few 
plain rounds, the stitch- 
es are gradually de- 
creased at the end of 
each needle until all are 
used. The point is reach- 
ed at the 70th round. 
The brim, 18 rounds 
deep and 15 inches 
round, with the outer 
edge supported by a 
piece of wire, is knitted 
separately and after- 
wards sewn on. The 
60 foundation stitches 
of the cap are again 
taken up on 4 needles, 
and the knitting is con- 
tinued for the head, 
working separately on 

two with black wool and two with flesh-colored; 
3^ inches is the length of the black back part of 
the head; in knitting this towards the neck, the 
stitches must be decreased so that at last only 10 
are left on each needle. With the flesh-colored 
wool about i}i inch is now knitted plain, and the 
worker must then take up the stitches necessary 
for the length of the nose, between the two needles 
to about 20, closing the small gusset shape again 
when the nose is knitted. After a few rows more, 
in which a decrease is made here and there on 




No. 1. — Knitted Harlequin. 



flesh-colored wool, the 
side edges of the head 
part and face are sewn 
together, and the head 
and face are stuffed with 
cotton-wool before knit- 
ting further. This must 
be done with great care 
and taste so that the 
features may be well 
moulded. The red wool 
is now to be put on for 
the body and the width 
of the shoulder reached 
in 20 rounds, by folding 
the knitting over to the 
half and taking up 1 
stitch on both sides at 
the beginning and end 
of each needle (there- 
fore 4 stitches in every 
row) and knitting 2 rows 
over; the worker must 
also take up a few stitch- 
es here and there in the 
knitted part, until the 
width of the chest and 
back consists of 48 
stitches. Now the arm- 
holes are formed, and 
therefore 20 rows are 
knitted backwards and 
forwards for the back as 
well as the chest, in purl 
and plain. The arms are 
knitted separately with 
36 stitches divided 
on 4 needles and first 
knitted ^A inches long 
plain; then 6 stitches are 
to be increased and again 
decreased, and the arm finished with a length of 
3^ inches, narrowing during the knitting so that at 
last only 5 stitches are left on each needle. The 
flesh colored wool is now to be put on and the hand 
knitted plain for 25 rounds long, 4 stitches being nar- 
rowed off, after 10 rounds for the thumb. It is then 
completed separately in 8 or 10 rounds with the help 
of 3 stitches cast on afresh. After the hand and 
arm have been stuffed and the figures each marked 
by close stitching, the arms are to be sewn into the 
armholes. The upper part of the body is then 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



139 



knitted for 3^ inches long down to the waist, nar- 
rowing so much under the arms and at the begin- 
ning and end of each needle that 12 stitches are left 
on each of the 4; 6 plain rounds finish the waist. 
For sVa- inches long (lower part of the body), 
the worker must gradually increase all round, so 



beard. A little rouge on the cheeks gives the whole 
face a more natural appearance. 



No. 2. — Child's Reins. 



that when the middle of this is reached, 25 stitches 
are on every needle and must again be decreased 
at the end so that 20 stitches remain. The legs are 
now begun with green wool, and require each 40 
stitches of those now in use and 5 cast on afresh. 
Before knitting the above, it is necessary to stuff 
the body, and the stitches taken up for each leg 
must also be sewn very close together. The legs 
are each 4^ inches long as far as the knee, for 
which 12 stitches are again to be narrowed in 12 
rows; at the same time a few stitches are to be nar- 
rowed at the bend of the knee. From the knee to 
the ankle the leg is 3^ inches long; at the calf of 
the leg the stitches are again increased and de- 
creased, so that in beginning the boots 8 stitches 
are on every needle. When the leg has been stuffed, 
the black is fastened on for shoes and 10 rows knit- 
ted round, then the heel and foot are 
formed as in making a stocking. 
Before the last stitches are sewn to- 
gether at the point of the toe, the 
boot is to be stuffed. Black buttons 
and a yellow cord of crocheted chain 
with tassels at the ends, imitate the 
closing of a. shoe. For the Vandyke 
points with small bells trimming the 
neck, sleeves and shoulders, the 
worker has to cast on 12, 6 and 3 ■-..--- 

stitches and to increase to 23, 12 and 
6 stitches; then decrease again. The 
Vandykes ornamenting the hips have 
a small yellow scollop edge; the up- 
per part is also fastened by a narrow 
band crocheted on. The hair is knitted like a gar- 
ter with black wool, wetted and ironed, cut in half 
lengthwise and then raveled out as long as required. 
Eyebrows are imitated by black dashes; the eyes 
themselves are made with beads; red stitches form 
the mouth and a few threads of black wool the 



Child's Reins. 



No. 




2. — Cut a piece of wiggan for the front 
piece 16 inches long by 9 inches wide; 
then cut two pieces of flannel or felt, 
and on one of them embroider or 
fasten on a transfer-pattern of a horse. 
Lay a piece of goods each side of the 
wiggan and bind the three pieces to- 
gether; then at each end make a band 
or strap large enough to fasten round 
the child's waist. For the reins use 
single zephyr in bright colors and No. 
12 needles. Cast on 14 stitches and 
in plain knitting, make a length of 3 
yards and fasten the reins just above 
the band that goes round the waist. 
Knit 4 strips each about three-eighths 
of a yard long and sew them to the 
corners to tie the piece on with (see 
engraving). Sew tiny bells to the lower 
edge of the piece. The flannel used 
may be gray, blue, red, yellow or black, as preferred. 

Knitted Reins and Whip for Children. 

No. 3. — Little folk may make the reins for 
themselves from remnants of bright colored wools, 
when mamma has begun the work for them as 
follows: 

Cast on 12 stitches and knit back and forth in 
one color for 4 inches. Then join another color 
and knit another 4 inches and so on until a strip 
as long as desired is made. Then sew the strip 
together over a stout cord, and make a loop of the 
covered cord at each end of the strip, using 9^ 
inches for each loop. These loops are for the 
arms to pass through. 

The whip-handle may be covered with a strip 




No. 3.— Knitted Reins and Whip for Children. 



similarly knitted. The reins may be shaped like 
either of the other sets illustrated. The whip- 
handle may be made athome froma smooth pliable bit' 
of wood or a tapering branch of willow or any other 
flexible shrub. A handsome set of reins and whip- 
cover may be made from crochet or knitting silk. 



140 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted " Sambo." 

No. 4. — This "Sambo" is made of zephyr in 
.the following colors: 

For the Face and Hands: Ecru. (Black or white 
may be used if preferred.) 

For the Hat and Body : Blue. 

For the Legs : Red and white. 

For the Garters, Belt and Trimmings : Black. 

The figure must be stuffed with cotton as you 
knit it. 

Begin at the Foot. — Cast on each of 3 needles, 
15 stitches. Knit 3 rounds 
plain. Then for the center 
of the front, narrow as fol- 
lows: K 2 together at the 
end of the needle, and 2 to- 
gether at the beginning of 
the next. Narrow in this, 
way until there are but 5 
stitches on these 2 needles, 
and the original 15 on the 
other needle. 

Now divide the stitches 
so that there will be 8 stitch- 
es each on the needle at 
each side of the center of 
the front, and 9 on the 
other. K 3 rounds plain, 
and knit to the center of 
the back. * Join the white 
and make a seam stitch by 
knitting 1 at the front and 1 
* at the back of the middle 
stitch. Knit 2 rounds of the 
white. Join the red; knits 
rounds widening at each side 
of the seam in the first 
round. Repeat 4 times more 
"' from *. 

Join the black and knit 5 
rounds for the garter. Knit 
5 rounds of red. 

To begin the Trousers. — 
Knit in rib style; (k 2 seam 
2 ; * k 4 rounds. In next 
round widen twice on the 
inside of the leg. Repeat 
from * 5 times more. In 
widening be careful to pre- 
serve the order of the ribs. 
This completes one leg. 
Make the other like it. 

Join the legs by placing the two needles together 
at the inner side of the legs and knitting 6 stitches 
from them at the same time — that is, you slip the 
needle through 1 stitch on each needle, draw through 
both with one thread and slip them off as if they 
were but one stitch. Then cast off these 6 stitches. 

Divide the remaining stitches onto four needles, 
and knit twenty-five rounds. In the next round 
narrow once at the end of each needle. Next, join 
the black and knit 6 rounds for the belt. 

Now join the blue for the waist, and knit 46 




No. 4.— Knitted •' Sambo.' 



rounds or about 3 inches. Then divide your stitches 
so that the needles will cross at the center of the 
front and back and on each shoulder. Now knit, 
narrowing in every other round, at each side of each 
shoulder as follows: Knit the last 2 of the first 
needle you knit from, together; slip the first stitch 
of the next needle, knit the next and pass the 
slipped stitch over. Knit to the other shoulder 
and narrow in the same way. Knit and narrow in 
this manner until there are 34 stitches, and knit the 
next round plain. 

Now join the color for the face. Knit 6 rounds; 
then widen 16 stitches in the 
next 4 rounds (once on each 
needle). Knit plain for 1 
inch; then widen 1 on each 
needle. Then knit plain for 
Yz inch; next narrow 2 on 
each needle; knit 3 rounds; 
then narrow 2 on each nee- 
dle; knit 3 rounds; narrow 
2 on each needle; knit 2 
rounds; narrow 2 on each 
needle; knit 1 round; nar- 
row 1 on each needle; knit 
1 round and bind off. 

For the Arm. — Cast 6 
stitches on each of 3 needles ; 
k 2 rounds. In the next 3 
rounds widen to 27 stitches. 
Knit plain until the section 
is an inch deep from the 
edge. Then, in the next 
round narrow one on each 
needle. Then knit plain 
until the section is 2^ in- 
ches long. In the next 
round, narrow 1 on each 
needle; knit 3 rounds; then 
narrow 1 on each needle. 
There should now be 18 
stitches. Knit 7 rounds; 
then narrow 1 on each nee- 
dle. K 12 rounds; thennar- 
row 1 on each needle; k 1 
round; join the ecru, knit 10 
rounds; then narrow 1 'on 
each needle; k 1 round; then 
narrow all the stitches off by 
knitting 2 together each 
time. 

To make the Wool or 

Hair. — Cast on 10 stitches 

and knit in garter style until you have a strip about 

12 inches long. Dampen and press with a hot iron, 

cut lengthwise through the center and ravel. 

For the Cap. — Cast 25 stitches onto each of three 
needles. Knit 6 rounds plain; then* narrow at the 
beginning and end of each needle. Knit 3 rounds 
plain, and repeat from * until there are 13 stitches 
on each needle. Knit 3 rounds, narrow as usual, 
and also knit the middle 2 stitches on each needle 
together. Knit 2 rounds plain; narrow the same as 
in last narrowed round. Knit 1 round plain; nar- 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



141 



row at the beginning and end of each needle, and 
knit the 3 center stitches together. Knit 1 round 
plain. Then thread a needle with the yarn you are 
using and draw through the 3 stitches on each needle. 
Draw closely and fasten. 

Finish the neck and wrists with chain-stitching. 




No. 5. — Knitted Belns for a Child. 

Simulate buttons with tiny knots of the wool, and a 
lacing with the same wool in cross stitch. 

Any colors preferred to those named may be used. 

Knitted Reins for a Child. 

No. 5. — There is no amusement that little chil- 
dren are so fond of as that of "playing horse," and 
for this purpose they are always asking 
mothers, sisters, etc., to buy or make 
reins for them. 

We give, above, a design for some 
reins in plain knitting. They are knit- 
ted with coarse yarn or Germantown 
wool. No. 12 needles are required. 

Cast on 14 stitches, and in plain 
knitting knit a length of 3 yards for 
the reins, and 4 pieces of half a-yard 
each for the arms and cross pieces. 
Work the name of the child, or of a 
favorite horse, on the front, in cross- 
stitch, with white wool, and add little 
bells, front and back, to complete it. Or, if pre- 
ferred, make the reins plain as seen in the engraving. 

Knitted Ball 

No. 6. — The materials required are twelve differ- 
ent colors of Berlin wool, and two bone knitting 




No. 6. — Knitted Ball. 



needles, No. 10. The ball is composed of twelve 
sections, each one of a different color. To com- 
mence, cast on 24 stitches. Work throughout in. 
patent knitting ; that is, m 1, si 1, k 2 together. 

First row. — Work as above described. 

Second row. — Work on all but the last 3 stitches - 
leave them on the needle, and turn. 

Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth rows. — Work on 
all but the first and last 3 stitches. 

Seventh renv. — Work on all but the first 3 and 
last 6. 

Eighth row. — Work on all but the first 6 and last 
6 stitches. 

Ninth and Tenth rows. — Work to the end of the 
needle ; then take another color, and repeat from 
the second row. When you have worked the 12 
sections, cast off the stitches, and sew together on 
the wrong side. The ball must be drawn together 
at one end, and then filled with odds and ends of 
wool or wadding, then neatly drawn together at the 
other end. Work a chain loop about two inches in 
length, and fasten to the top of the ball. A soft 
ball of this kind will be found very appropriate for 
the nursery, as it will not injure anything it may 
come in contact with. 

Doll's Knitted Leggings. 

No. 7. — These leggings are knitted with blue 
and white split zephyr wool and fine steel needles. 
Cast on 40 stitches and knit 18 rounds in ribbed 
knitting, 2 stitches plain and 2 
purled alternately. 

Next knit 36 rounds in plain 
knitting, alternating 4 rounds with 
white and 4 rounds with blue 
wool; in the 15th, 23rd, 31st and 
36th rounds, narrow by knitting 
the first 2 stitches together. After 
the 36 plain rounds knit 26 in rib- 
bed knitting with white wool; in 
the last 6 of these, to form the 
gusset at the side, widen by knit- 
ting 2 stitches out of one on both 
sides of the middle 
18 stitches ; work 
the stitches gained 
by widening in plain knitting. At the 
end of the 26th round cast off all but 
the middle 18 stitches between the 
gusset and on these work 17 rows in 
ribbed knitting for the foot, narrowing 
at both edges in every 4th row, after 
which cast off the remaining stitches 
and work a round in single crochet 
around the bottom of the legging. Set 
buttons along the side, and sew a rib- 
bon strap to pass under the sole at the 
bottom. If preferred, but one color need be used. 

Knitted Soldier Doll. 

(For Illustrations see next Page.) 

No. 8. — This doll is made of zephyr in white, 
black, dark green, red and blue, the latter color 




No. 7. — Doll's 
Knitted Legging. 



142 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



being used for the shoes, the crown of the cap and 
the decorations on the waist; the white for the 
face and hands, and the black for the back of the 




No. 8. — Knitted Soldier Doll. 
(For Directions see this and preceding Page.) 

head and the green for the top. It is knitted, with 
the exception of the feet, in proportions similar to 
but smaller than those of the doll seen at No. 4, 
but is all in plain knitting. The directions, for the 
knitted " Sambo " will, however, be a sufficient 
guide for shaping this doll. 

Narrow knitted red bands, made with four 
needles and trimmed with over-and-over stitches 
of blue are about the waist, neck and arm-holes. 
The wrists are finished with an over-and-over 
stitch, and 3 red stitchings are down the back of 
each hand, in imitation of glove-stitchings. But- 
tons and bars of blue»are embroidered on the front 
of the waist. Knitted pockets are added to the 
trousers and a handkerchief of white lawn, over- 
handed with blue, is in one pocket. Red lacings are 
worked on the shoes and tied in front of the ankle. 

A crocheted chain of red is sewed about the 
face where its white and the black and green of 



the head meet, and the cap is crocheted as follows: 
Begin with a chain of 3 and work round and round 
in single crochets, widening now and then until the 
cap is large enough around for the head, and is 
xYz inches deep. Then add 2 rows of red, then 2 
rows of blue, then 2 rows of red to complete the 
edge. Tack the top of the cap down and complete 
it with a tassel. 

To knit the Doll. — Begin at the bottom of the 
waist and knit upward, seaming a stitch at the 
center of the front, and narrowing on the shoulders 
the same as in making the doll referred to. 
Knit the face and the back of the head separately, 
widening each, and purling back after every knit- 
ted row, so as to keep the work the same on the 
outside. Sew up at the sides, and finish the top 
of the head with 4 needles, narrowing it down to 
nothing. The knitter must use personal judgment 
in shaping the face and the top of the head, and 
must stuff the lower part of the doll as she knits. 

Now, pick up the stitches around the waist, and 
knit round and round for 2M inches, seaming a 
stitch at the center of the front. Then divide the 
stitches evenly and use half of them for each leg, 
knitting the legs separately and narrowing them 
gradually to the ankle. Then join the blue and 
have one needle at the back of the leg for the heel. 
Knit back and forth, like a heel, until the strip is 
long enongh to form a heel as seen in the picture. 
Cast off these stitches and sew the heel together 
along the lower edge and for two or three stitches 
up the sides. Now pick up the stitches on each 
side of the heel, as in a stocking, and with the 
stitches on the other needles finish each foot the 
same as a stocking, narrowing down to 1 stitch. 
Fasten firmly and then with a needle arrange the 
stuffing so as to nicely shape the foot. 

Knit and sew on the arms on the same plan as 
those on the doll at No. 4. 

The doll may be made as large or small as desired 
by casting on more or less stitches. This point 
must be made a matter 
of personal judgment. 

Knitted Ball. 

No. 9. — Get a small 
India-rubber ball or a 
cork and wind it over 
with coarse wool until it 
is of the size required. 
Then knit the cover, < 
which is 7^ inches 
around, as follows: 

Cast on 24 stitches and 
knit back and forth in 2 

colors — 6 rows of each, until there are 14 stripes of 
the 2 colors. Then join the two sides of the 
stripes, slip the cover over the ball and draw its 
ends down tight by a row of gathering-stitches so 
that the stripes will form points. Any bright 
colors preferred may be used in working a ball like 
this. The rainbow colors, two stripes of each, are 
pretty for it. 




No. 9. — Knitted Ball. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



143 



AKJCGLLftNY. 



Knitted Twine-Ball Case. 

No. i. — This ball is made of Nile-green knitting 

or crochet silk. 
String 450 beads 
upon the silk before 
beginning to knit. 
Cast on 50 stitches. 
Knit back and forth 
as follows: 

Knit 1 row, purl 
back for 9 rows. 
This maks a plain, 
flat section. Now, 
the last row being 
knit; to reverse the 
knitting to produce 
a purled section and 
introduce the beads, 
knit back 9, slip a 
bead forward, knit 

8, slip another bead 
forward, and repeat 
in this manner until 
there are 5 beads in 
the row; then knit 

9. Now purl back 
for the next row. 

Third row. — Knit 
8, slip a bead, k 2, 
slip another bead; * 
knit to within 1 
stitch of the next 
bead in the preced- 
ing row; slip a bead, 
k 2 , slip another 
bead and repeat 
from * to end of 
row. Purl back. 

Fifth row. — Same 
as 3rd row between 
the stars. Purl 
back. 

Seventh row . — 
Like 3rd. Purl back. 

Ninth row. — Like 
1 st. Knit back to 
reverse the pattern. 

Repeat plain and 
beaded sections un- 
til there are 10 of 
each, and sew it 
together at the sides. 

Gather it closely at 
No. I—Knitted Twine-Ball Case. Qne end) ^ in the 

ball of twine, and 
gather the other end, leaving an end of the twine 
extending through the tiny opening left by the 



gathering. Sew a ribbon loop at the top to hang 
it up by (see engraving); and suspend a pair of 
scissors as seen in the picture, from the lower part 
of the case. Fasten both long loops on with shorter 
fancy loops and ends. 

Knitted Purse. 

No. 2. — Use Belding's knitting silk and 4 No. 
17 needles. 

Cast on 40 stitches, putting 14 on the first 
needle, 12 on the second and 14 on the third. 
Knit once around plain. 

First, Second, Fifth, Sixth, Ninth and Tenth 
rounds. — P 10, k 2 crossed, p 2, k 2 crossed, p 2, 
k 2 crossed, and repeat for the round. 

Third, Fourth, Seventh, Fighth, Eleventh and 
Twelfth rounds. — K 10, k 2 crossed, p 2, k 2 
crossed, p 2, k 2 crossed and repeat. 

Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Seventeenth, Eighteenth, 
Twenty -first arid Twenty - second rounds. — K 2 
crossed, p 2, k 2 crossed, 
p 2, k 2 crossed, p 10 
and repeat. 

Fifteenth, Sixteenth, 
Nineteenth, Twentieth, 
Twenty-third and Twenty- 
fourth rounds . — K 2 
crossed, p 2, k 2 crossed, 
p 2, k 2 crossed, k 10, and 
repeat. 

Repeat these twenty- 
four rounds twice more, 
making 72 rounds in all. 
Then knit once around 
plain. 

Seventy-fourth round. — 
K 2 ; then alternately th 
o, k 2 together, to within 
2 of the end; knit these 
plain. 

Seventy-fifth round. — Purl back instead of work- 
ing around to form an opening at the middle of 
the purse. Purl back and forth in this way until 
you have a strip 2^ inches long. Then knit once 
around plain. 

Now resume the pattern and knit it 3 times. 
Then bind off ; draw one end together and finish 
with an ornamental tassel •, sew the other end to- 
gether straight, and finish with bead fringe or as 
illustrated. 

A purse of this shape may be made of plain 
knitting, casting on 50 to 60 stitches as a founda- 
tion. Or, doubling the stitches, use 2 needles and 
knit back and forth until a strip 9 inches long is 
made. Bind off and sew up, leaving a slit at the 
middle. One color or different colors in stripes 
may be used. 




No. 2. — Knitted Purse. 



144 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted Purse. 

No. 3. — Four No. 18 knitting needles and knit- 
ting silk of any color preferred are to be used in 
making this purse. To begin, use 2 needles only, 
and leave an end of the silk about 10 inches long 
with which to sew up the purse when made. 

Cast on 20 stitches, and knit in garter fashion 
for 5 rows. 

Sixth row. — Knit 3, th o, k 14, th o, k 3. 

Seventh row. — Knit 22. In every uneven row up 
to the 21st row, knit plain like last row, knitting 2 
more stitches in each row. In the 21st row there 
will be 36 stitches. 

Eighth row. — K 3, th o, k 16, th 0, k 3. 

Tenth row. — K 3, th o, k 
18, th 0, k 3. 

Twelfth row. — K 3, th o, 
k 20, th o, k 3. 

Fourteenth row. — K 3, th 
o, k 22, th o, k 3. 

Sixteenth row. — K 3, th o, 
k 24, th o, k 3. 

3, th 



-K 



Eighteenth row 
o, k 26, th o, k 3. 

Twentieth row. — K 3, th 
o, k 28, th o, k 3. After 
the 21st row, cut the silk, 
leaving an end about 10 
inches long. Do not cast 
off. This completes the first 
portion of the 2 parts which 
form the mouth of the 
purse. 

Make another section like 
the first, but do not break 
the silk. 

Now transfer 12 stitches 
from each needle to a third 
needle, and begin knitting 
in rounds as follows: Knit 
6 rounds plain. 

Seventh round. — N, th o, 
and repeat. Knit 5 rounds 
plain. 

Thirteenth round. — K 3, th 
o, si 1, n, pass slipped stitch 
over, th o, k 2, and repeat. 

Fourteeenth, Sixteenth atid 
Eighteenth rounds. — Plain. 

Fifteenth roimd.- — K 1, n, 
b and repeat. 

Seventeenth round. — Like 13th. Knit 2 rounds 
plain. Transfer the first 4 stitches on each needle 
to the next needle; this will leave 4 stitches on the 
3rd needle which are to be knitted as a portion of 
the 20th round. 

Twenty- fir st and Twenty -fifth rounds. — Like 13th. 

Twenty-second, Twenty-fourth and Twenty-sixth 
rounds. — Plain. 

Twenty-third round. — Like 1 5 th. 

Twenty-seventh round. — Plain. 

Twenty-eighth round. — Plain to last 4. Transfer 
the last 4 stitches on each needle to the next 




No. 3. — Knitted Purse 



needle and consider the 28th round completed. 
Twenty-Jiinth and Thirty-third rounds. — Like 
13 th. 

Thirtieth, Thirty-second and Thirty-fourth rounds. 
—Plain. 

Thirty-first round. — Like 15th. Knit 2 rounds 
plain; transfer the first 4 stitches on each needle, 
to the next needle, which will leave 4 stitches on 
the 3rd needle, and these are to be knitted as a 
part of the 36th round in addition to those already 
knit. 

Thirty -seventh and Forty-first rounds. — Like 13th. 
Thirty-eighth, Fortieth and Forty-second rounds,. 
—Plain. 

Thirty-ninth round. — Like 15th. Knit 5 rounds 
plain. 

Forty-eighth round. — N, th 
o and repeat. K 6 rounds 
plain. 

Fifty-fifth round. — K 4, n, 
and repeat. K 2 rounds 
plain. 

Fifty-eighth round. — K 3, 
n and repeat. K 2 rounds 
plain. 

Sixty- first round. — K 2 ; 
n and repeat. K 2 rounds 
plain. 

Sixty-fourth round. — K i f 
n, and repeat. Knit 1 round 
plain, and narrow twice in 
every round after that until 
all the stitches are disposed 
of but 6. Then cast off, 
leaving enough silk to se- 
cure the stitches and sew on 
the metallic ornament. 

Now turn the bag wrong 
side out, as the purled side 
is shown in the engraving. 
The knitted side, however, 
may be used for the outside 
of the purse if desired. 

With the ends of silk left 
hanging where the stitches 
were cast on, and a coarse 
needle, secure one of the 
metal bars to each edge, 
passing the threaded needle 
over the bar, and through 



th o, k 3, th o, si and each and every loop at the top of the purse. 



Knitted Wash Rag. 

(No Illustration.) 

Use No. 12 white knitting cotton and two steel 
needles of the largest size. 

Cast on 54 stitches. Knit plain 12 rows (rather 
loosely.) 

Thirteenth Row. — K 12, *o, n, o, n, repeat from 
(*) 14 times; k 12, repeat the 13 rows for the 
length required ; then k plain 12 rows. Edge it all 
around with narrow lace, knitted with white cotton 
in any design preferred. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



145 



Knitted Holder. 

No. 4. — This pretty holder is knit in imitation 
of an ear of corn. It is made of yellow German- 
town yarn and 



r 



green silk. Use 
quite coarse steel 
needles. 

Cast on 45 
stitches and then 
work with 2 
threads as f o 1 - 
lows: 

First row. — Knit 
5 with 1 thread; 
take the other 
thread and draw 
it tightly across 
the back of the 
knitted stitches to 
produce a curved 
effect, like a ker- 
nel of corn. Knit 
the next 5 with 
the second thread 
and draw them 
up with the first 
thread. Use these 
2 threads alter- 



this 
the 



I 



nately, in 
way, across 
row. 

Second row. — 
Knit back, taking 
first the thread 
which was used in 
making the next 
to the last kernel. 
Knit as in preced- 
ing row, except 
that you must 
keep the threads 
on the wrong side 
of the work which, 
in this row is next 
to you. The se- 
cret of success in 
knitting this hold- 
er is the drawing 
of the threads to 
form the kernels. 
They must be 
drawn tightly and not allowed to slip. 

Knit back and forth in this manner until the 
holder is 25 kernels deep. Then, instead of cast- 
ing off, take a yarn needle and draw the knitting 
threads through the stitches tying them tightly. 
Draw the other end together to correspond in 
shape. Add a tassel of green silk at one end, and 
a crocheted ornament of the same silk at the other 
end. To make this ornament crochet as follows: 
Pick up a loop through the end-kernel, make 3 
chain; 1 double, very loose, in each of the re- 
maining 8 kernels; 3 chain, 2 doubles between 
:o 



No. 4. — Knitted Holder. 



every double underneath and fasten to the 3-chain. 

Knitted Purse. 

No. 5. — Use Belding's silk and No. 18 needles. 
Cast onto 1 needle 59 stitches and knit across plain. 

Second row. — P 2 together, th o and repeat until 
one stitch remains. Knit this. Repeat this row up 
to the 65th row inclusive. Now make 83 rows of 
plain knitting; then 65 rows of the fancy knitting. 
Knit 1 row plain and cast off. 

You will now have a long, flat piece, a little nar- 
rower at the center than at the ends. Sew up the 
edges, leaving an opening 2^2 inches long at the 
middle. Join one end flatly and draw the other 
together as seen in the picture, and finish with steel 
trimmings. 

Knitted Hammock. 

(No Illustration.) 

A hammock may be knitted by the following 
instructions, and will be found comfortable as well 
as pretty. A small hammock in the nursery is a 
convenience to a mother and a delight to her baby; 
and a hammock slung from the window-sill across 
the corner of a room and fastened to the wall, will, 
when completed with cushions, form a delightful 
lounging place for reading. 

Use strong cord, macram^ or any variety that is 
well covered or twisted, and with one or two colors, 
knit with two large wooden needles, as follows: 

Cast on 25 stitches and knit in a plain or fancy 
stitch a strip about 5 feet long. Make 4 such strips 
and join them with the same cord by an over-and- 
over stitch. Then fasten the ends of the hammock to 
wooden bows, such as may be either purchased or 




5. — Knitted Purse. 



made at home. A fringe of the cord may be knot- 
ted on the edges and across the bows of the ham- 
mock with a pretty effect, and it may be of one 
color, or both colors if two are used. Colored 
twine may be selected as the material from which 
to make such a hammock. For an infant's ham- 
mock cast on about 15 stitches and make the strips 
about a yard long. 



146 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 




Ko. 6. — Knitted Pence Jug. 



Knitted Pence Jug. 

No. 6. — For making this useful jug for holding 
odd pennies, a small quantity each of heavy, black 
and scarlet Germantown yarn will be required, and 5 
No. 16 needles. 

Take the red yarn and on one needle cast 12 

stitches for 
the spout of 
thejug; and 
10 on each 
of three 
other nee- 
dles. 

First, Se- 
cond, Third 
and Fourth 
rounds. — 
Plain. 

Fifth 
r o u?i d . — 
Knit 2, purl 
2 alternate- 
ly all round 
until the 
stitches for 
the spout 
are reach- 
e d; then 
knit 2 to- 
gether, knit 
8 plain, knit 
2 together. 
Repeat the 5 th round 3 times more. 

Ninth round. — Purl 2, knit 2 alternately until you 
reach the spout; then knit 2 together, knit 8 plain. 
Tenth round. — Purl 2, knit 2 alternately. For 
the spout, knit 7 plain, knit 2 together. 

Repeat the 9th and 10th rounds 3 times more. 
This will complete the spout. Cast off by knitting 
the 2 remaining stitches together. There will now 
be 30 stitches on the remaining needles. Then knit 
as follows: 

* Purl 2 rounds, knit 2 rounds and repeat from * 
4 times more. Join on the black and begin the 
bowl as follows: 

First round. — Make 2 in 1, purl the rest plain. 
Seco?id round. — Purl. 

Then knit 4 rounds in scarlet, and 1 round in 
black, increasing every 4th stitch; purl 2 rounds. 

Knit 4 rounds in scarlet, and 1 round in black, 
increasing every 6th stitch; purl 2 rounds. 

Knit 6 rounds in scarlet; knit 1 round in black; 
purl 2 rounds in black; knit 4 rounds in scarlet; 
knit 1 round in black, decreasing by knitting the 
7th and 8th stitches together. 

Purl two rounds in black, knit 4 in scarlet, knit 1 
in black, decreasing by knitting the 12th and 13th 
stitches together. 

Purl 2 rounds in black. There should now be 72 
stitches. Divide these by 6, marking the divisions. 
Knit n rounds in scarlet, decreasing 6 stitches in 
each round, by knitting 2 together at the commence- 
ment of each division. This will leave 6 stitches. 



Draw these together with a needle and the wool, 
and sew them securely. 

For the Handle. — Cast on 6 stitches and knit and 
purl alternately until you have made a strip 3 inches 
long. Then bind off and sew the handle to the jug. 

Knitted Bath Mitten. (Especially Adapted 
for Bathing Infants.) 

No. 7. — This useful article is made of Dexter's 
cotton No. 8, and is knitted on two needles and 
sewed together at the side. 

Cast on 36 stitches, and knit in rib style for 
about two inches as follows : Knit 3, seam 3 and 
repeat across the row. In knitting back, seam the 
knitted stitches and knit the seamed ones. 

Next knit 2 plain ridges across the work. 

Then knit 17 stitches, th o, k 2, th o, k 17. This 
begins the widening for the thumb portion. Knit 
back plain. 

Next row. — K 17, th o, k 4, th o, k 17. Knit 
back plain. 

Make 8 ridges by this plan, knitting 17 both be- 
fore and after widening each time. Then knit 2 
ridges without widening. 

Next slip off the 17 stitches at each side of the 
thumb onto a thread, and knit back and forth 
across the thumb portion until there are 6 ridges; 
then knit 3 more 
ridges, narrowing 
once each time 
across; there will 
then be 10 stitch- 
es left on the nee- 
dle. Draw the 
yarn through 
these 10 stitches, 
d r a wi n g them 
into as small a 
space as possible; 
fasten them and 
sew up the thumb 
with the same 
piece of yarn. 

Take up the 
slipped stitches 
on a needle and 
knit 18 ridges 
without narrow- 
ing. In the next 
6 ridges narrow 
once at each side 
and once in the 
middle of the 
needle to shape 
the mitten. There 
will then be 19 
stitches the last 

time across. Draw the yarn through them and # 
fasten them, and sew up the mitten the same as the 
thumb. 

To make the Loop. — Fasten on a piece of yarn to 
make a loop as long as desired, and then work over 
it in button-hole stitch or in tatting style. If pre- 
ferred, the loop may be crocheted. 




No. 7. — Knitted Bath Mitten. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



U7 



Knitted Holder. 



No. 8. — Lavender and white zephyr and fine 
needles were used in knitting this holder. Cast on 
64 stitches. Knit across plain with the lavender yarn. 
Knit back 12 stitches plain; then add the white yarn 
and knit: 8 white, 8 lavender, 8 white, 8 lavender, and 
8 white, following the same plan as in knitting the 
corn-design at No. 4; then 12 lavender plain. Knit 
back and fortlf in 
this way 8 times. 
This forms one 
division of the de- 
sign. In the next 
row knit with the 
lavender so as to 
reverse the order 
of the blocks, 
making the se- 
cond block of 
white instead of 
lavender. Knit 8 
rows also for this 
division. Knit in . 
this order until 
the holder is 8 
blocks wide and 
cast off. No ^.-Knitted Holdeb. 

Gather the 
block portion at each end under a tiny bow. 

Holders of this style are very handsome made of 
knitting silk, and the ends may be arranged in a 
variety of ways. 



Second roiu. — Slip 1, knit 1, put thread over ; 
knit 2, put thread over, knit 2 together; knit 1. 

Third row. — Slip 1, knit 2, put thread over, knit 
2 out of the next stitch, putting the thread over 
before making each stitch; knit 1, purl 1, knit 2. 

Fourth row. — Slip 1, knit 7, put thread over, 
knit 2 together, knit 1. 

Fifth row. — Slip 1, knit 2, put thread over, knit 
2 l^ 6 ether, make 1 dot; for this dot take the next 

2 stitches on an- 




otherneedle,wind 
the yarn four 
times around 
these two stitches 
from the wrong 
side toward the 
right, and then 
knit them off; 
then knit 1, make 
a dot as before, 
and knit 1. 

Sixth row . — 
Cast off 4 stitch- 
es, knit 3, put 
thread over, knit 
2 together, knit 1. 

This edging is 
very quaint-look- 
ing and pretty, 
and can be made of thread or silk for any purpose. 



Knitted Holder. 

No. 9. — The holder illustrated by this picture is 
made of ordinary yarn in two colors, although it 
may also be made of odds and ends of wool left 
over from fancy work. It is knitted on steel 
needles in alternate squares of plain and purled 
(or seam) stitches. When finished there must be 
seven rows of one color all round the holder be- 
tween the sqares and the border. The holder here 
pictured is made of red and gray yarn. 

Cast on 64 stitches, and knit 7 rows of one color 
plain; then of the same color knit 7 stitches plain; 
join the other color, and purl 10; carry the first 
yarn along the back, and knit 10 plain; then with 
the second color purl 10; then with the first color 
knit 10; with the other color purl 10; and then 
with the first color knit 7. 

Turn, knit 17 plain, joining the second color at 
the 8th stitch; purl 10, knit 10, purl 10, knit 17, 
joining the second color to correspond with the 
other side. 

Knit 10 rows for each row "of squares, and re- 
verse the order of the colors for the alternate rows, 
as seen in the engraving. 

When six rows of squares are completed, knit 7 
rows plain; and then knit the border as follows, 
and sew it on: 

Cast on 7 stitches. 

First row. — Slip 1, knit 2, put the thread over, 
and knit 2 together, knit 2. 



Double Knitting (On Four Needles). 

. (No Illustration.; 

Cast on any even number of stitches, * bring the 
thread forward, slip a stitch, put the thread back 
to cross last stitch knit; knit 1 plain, putting the 
thread twice round the needle; repeat from *. In 
knitting with two needles every row back and front 
is the same, but you must take care, however, to 
knit the stitch that was slipped in the last row, and 
slip the one that was knitted; but, of course, it is 




No. 9. — Knitted Holder. 

not so with four needles. Then you cast on twice 
the number of stitches that you wish to have on 
the right side, and knit the first row by the above 
directions. It is well to put in a bit of colored 
wool or cotton to mark the beginning of the 
rounds, otherwise it may be a little difficult to dis- 
tinguish it, and, of course, it is there that the pat- 
tern changes. 

Second row. — The first stitch you come to is the 



148 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



one slipped in the last round, and that is to be 
purled with the thread twice around the needle. 
The next is the one that was knitted in the last 
round, which you will always easily recognize by 
the thread being twice round the needle; this is to 




Third row. — Knit 2, * th o, slip 1, knit, 1, pass slip- 
ped stitch over and repeat twice more from *; knit 2, 
* k 2 together twice, th o twice, and repeat 5 times 
more from last *. K 2 together twice, k 2 ; * k 2 to- 
gether, th 0, and repeat twice more from last *; k 3. 
Fifth row. — K 3, * th o, slip 1, k 1, 
pass slipped stitch over, and repeat twice 
more from * K 2, * th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether twice, and repeat twice more from 
last * Th o, * k 2 together twice, th o 
twice, and repeat twice more from last *. 
K 2, * k 2 together, th o, and repeat twice 
more from last *. K 4. 

Seventh row.—K 4, * th o, slip 1, k r, 
pass slipped stitch over and repeat twice 
more from *. * K 2 together twice, th 
o twice and repeat once more from last 
*. K 2 together twice, k 1, wrap thread 
around the needle once, purl 1, th o, k 
1, * k 2 together twice, th o twice and 
repeat once more from last *. Knit 2 
together three times, th o, * k 2 together, 
th o, repeat once more from last*. K5. 
Ninth row. — K 2, * k 2 together, th o, 



and repeat twice more from 



K 



be slipped, bringing the thread forward first, and 
replacing it when the stitch is taken off. Both put- 
overs of the thread are to be slipped as one stitch; 
purl the next, putting the thread twice round; 
bring the thread forward, slip the next, put the 
thread back, and continue these two stitches alter- 
nately throughout the round. 

Third row. — Like the first. 

Fourth row. — Like the 2nd; and so on. 

If rightly done, both sides of the work will look 
exactly alike, and will be quite detached from each 
other. If finer work is desired, we have no doubt 
it could be knitted as well with the thread once 
round, in the ordinary way; the purled stitch for 
the back must also be knitted to correspond. 

Knitted Night-Dress Case, with Details. 

(For Illustrations see this and next Page.1 

Nos. 10, 11, 12 and 13. — This case is a very 
pretty addition to the dainty adjuncts of my lady's 
wardrobe. It is made of crochet cotton and 
may be lined with white or tinted silk or cotton 
fabric. 

To Knit the Middle or Fancy Stripe (See No. 
12). — Cast on 47 stitches and purl or seam across 
once. 

First row. — * Knit 2 together, th o, and repeat 
twice more from *; knit 5, * th o twice, k 2 together 
twice and repeat from last *5 times more; th o 
twice, knit 5, * th o, slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch 
over and repeat twice more from last *; knit 1. 

Second row. — Purl. Also purl every alternate or 
even following row, being careful to knit the last 
half of each thread that is put over twice ; and also 
in purling back, knit the stitches in the small dia- 
monds, that were J>urled in the preceding row. 



th o twice, k 2 together twice and re- 
peat once more from last *. Th o twice, 
k 2 together, wrap the thread once around the 
needle, purl 3, th o, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 
together twice and repeat once more from last *. 
Th o twice, k 3, * th o, slip 1, k 1, pass slipped 
stitch over and repeat twice more from last *. K 3. 

Eleventh row. — K 1, * k 2 together, th o, and re- 
peat twice more from *. K 3, * k 2 together twice, 
th o twice and repeat once more from last *. K 2 
together twice, wrap the thread around the needle 
once, purl 2,"k 1, purl 2; * k 2 together twice, th o 
twice, and repeat once more from last *; k 2 to- 
gether twice, k 3, * th o, slip 1, k 1, pass slipped 
stitch over and repeat twice more from last *. K 2. 

Thirteenth row. — * Knit 2 together, th o, and re- 
peat twice more from * K 5, * th o twice, k 2 
together twice and repeat once more from last *. 
K 1, wrap the thread around the needle once, purl 2, 




No. 11. — Detail for Border to Case. 
(For Description see page 150.) 

k 3, purl 2, th o, k i. * K 2 together twice, th o 
twice and repeat once more from last *. K 5, * th o, 
slip 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over and repeat twice 
more from last *. K 1. 

Fifteenth row. — K 2, * th o, slip 1, k 1, pass 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



149 



slipped stitch over, and repeat twice more from * 
K 2, * k 2 together twice, th o twice and repeat 
once more from last *. Purl 2 together, wrap thread 
Dnce around the needle, purl 3, k 3, purl 3, th o, k 2 
together, * th o twice, k 2 together twice and repeat 




No. 12. — Fancy Stripe for Case. 
(For Description see this and preceding Page.) 



ance more from last *. K 2, * k 2 together, th 
and repeat twice more from last *. K 3. 

Seventeenth row. — K 3, * th o, slip 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over and repeat twice more from *. 
K 2, * th o twice, k 2 together twice and repeat 
once more from last *. Wrap thread once around 
the needle, purl 1, th o, purl 2 together, purl 2, k 1, 
purl 2, purl 2 together, wrap thread once around the 
Aeedle, puii 1, th o, * k 2 together twice, th o twice, 
and repeat once more from last *. K 2, * k 2 
together, th o, and repeat twice more from last 
*. K 4 . 

Nineteenth row. — K 4, * th o, slip 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over and repeat twice more from *. 
K 2 together twice, th o twice, k 2 together twice, 
k 1, wrap thread once around the needle, purl 3, th o, 
purl 2 together, purl 3, purl 2 together, wrap thread 
once around the needle, purl 3, th o, k 1, k 2 together 
twice, th o twice, k 2 together 3 times, th o, * k 2 
together, th o, and repeat once more from last 
*. K 5 . 

Twenty-first row. — K 2, * k 2 together, th o, and 
repeat twice more from *. K 3, th o twice, k 2 
together twice, th o twice, k 2 together, wrap thread 
around the needle once, purl 2, k 1, purl 2, th o, 
purl 2 together, purl 1, purl 2 together, wrap thread 
once around the needle, purl 2, k 1, purl 2, th o, k 2 
together, th o twice, k 2 together twice, th o twice, 
k 3; * th 0, slip 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over and 
repeat twice more from last *. K 3. 

Twenty-third rent'. — K 1, * k 2 together, thread 
over and repeat twice more from *; k 3, k 2 together 
twice, th o twice, k 2 together twice, wrap thread 
around the needle once, purl 3, k 1, purl 3, wrap 
thread around the needle once, purl 3 together. 



wrap thread once around the needle, purl 3, k 1, 
purl 3, th o, k 2 together twice, th o twice, k 2 
together twice, k 3, * th o, slip 1, k 1, pass slipped 
stitch over, and repeat twice more from last * K 2. 
Twenty-fifth row. — * K 2 together, th o, and repeat 
twice more from *. K 
5, th o twice, k 2 together 
twice, th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether, wrap the thread 
once around the needle, 
purl 2 together, purl 3, 
purl 2 together, purl 3, 
purl 2 together, th o, k 2 
together, th twice, k 2 
together twice, th o twice, 
k 5, * th o, slip 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over, re- 
peat twice more from 
last *. K 1. 

Twenty-seventh row. — 
K 2, * th o, slip 1, k 1, 
pass slipped stitch over 
and repeat twice more 
from last *. K 2, k 2 to- 
gether twice, th o twice, 
k 2 together twice, k 1, 
th o, purl 2 together, purl 
1, purl 2 together, wrap 
thread once around the 
needle., purl 2, k 1, purl 2, th o, purl 2 together, 
purl 1, purl 2 together, th o, ki, k 2 together twice, 
th o twice, k 2 together twice, k 2, * k 2 together, th 

0, and repeat twice more from last *. K 3. 
Twetity-nirth row. — Knit 3, * th 0, slip 1, k 1, pass 

slipped stitch over and 
repeat twice more from 
*. K 2, th o twice, k 2 
together twice, th o 
twice, k 2 together, k 1, 
wrap thread around the 
needle once, purl 3 to- 
gether, wrap thread 
around the needle once, 
P 2 , k 3, p 2, wrap 
thread around the nee- 
dle once, p 3 together, 
th o, k 1, k 2 together, 
th o twice, k 2 together 
twice, th o twice, k 2, 
* k 2 together, th o, re- 
peat twice more from 
last *. K 4. 

Thirty-first row . — 
Knit 4, * th o, si 1, k 

1, pass slipped stitch 
over, and repeat twice 
more from *. * K 2 
together twice, th o 

twice, and repeat once more from last *. K 2 to- 
gether, th o, p 2 together, p 2, k 3, p 2, p 2 together, 
th o, k 2 together, th o twice, k 2 together twice, th 
o twice, k 2 together 3 times, th o, * k 2 together, 
th o and repeat once more from from last *. K 5. 
Thirty-third row. — Knit 2, * k 2 together, th o 




No. 13. — Side Stripe for 
Case. 

(For Description see following 
Page.) 



150 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



and repeat twice more from *. K 3, * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and repeat once more from last 
*. K 1, th o, p 2 together, p 2, k 1, p 2, p 2 to- 
gether, th o, k 1, * k 2 together twice, th o twice 
and repeat once more from last *; k 3, * th o, si 1, 
k 1, pass slipped stitch over and repeat twice more 
from last * K 3. 

Thirty-fifth raw. — Knit 1, '" k 2 together, th o 
and repeat twice more from ""'; k 3, * k 2 together 
twice, th o twice, and repeat once more from last *; 
k 2 together; k 1, th 0, p 2 together, p 3, p 2 to 
gether, th o, k 1, k 2 together, * th o twice, k 2 to- 
gether twice and repeat once more from last *. 
K 3, * th o, si 1, k 1, pass slipped stitch over and 
repeat twice more from last *. K 2. 

Thirty-seventh row. — * K 2 together, th o and 
repeat twice more from *. K 5, * th o twice, k 2 
together twice, and repeat once more from last *; 
th o twice and k 2 together, th o, p 2 together, 
p 1, p 2 together, th o, k 2 together, * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and repeat once more from 
last *. Th o twice, k 5, * th o, si 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over and repeat twice more from 
last * K 1. 

Thirty-ninth row. — Knit 2, * th o, si 1, k 1 pass 
slipped stitch over and repeat twice more from *. 
K 2, * k 2 together twice, th o twice and repeat 
once more from last *. K 2 together twice, k 1, wrap 
thread around the needle, p 3 together, th o, k 1, * 
k 2 together twice, th o twice and repeat once more 
from last *. K 2 together twice, k 2, * k 2 together, 
th o and repeat twice more from last *. K 3. 

Forty-first ro7£>. — Knit 3, * th o, si 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over, and repeat twice more from *. 
K 2 * th o twice, k 2 together twice and repeat once 
more from last *. Th o twice, k 2 together, k 1, 
th o, * k 2 together twice, th o twice and repeat twice 
more from last *, K 2, * k 2 together, th o, and 
repeat twice more from last *. K 4. 

Forty-third row. — Knit 4, * th o, si 1, k I, pass 
slipped stitch over and repeat twice more from *. 
* K 2 together twice, th o twice and repeat twice 
more from last *. K 2 together, k 1, * th o twice, 
k 2 together twice and repeat once more from last *. 
Th o twice, k 2 together 3 times, th o, * k 2 to- 
gether, th o, and repeat once more from last *. K 5. 

Forty-fifth row. — Knit 4, * th o, si 1, k 1, pass 
slipped stitch over and repeat twice more from *. 
K 1, * th o twice, k 2 together twice, and repeat 5 
times more from last *; th o, k 2, tho, k 2 together, 
th o, k 2 together, th o, k 5. 

Repeat all these details, beginning with the 7 th 
row for the next section in the stripe, and work in 
this way until the stripe is 29 or 30 inches long. 

To Knit the Side Stripe (see No. 13). — Pick 
up the stitches along each edge of the middle 
stripe. Make 12 rows, knitting alternately as fol- 
lows: 1 plain row, 2 purled rows. 

Thirteenth row. — Knit 1, th o, p 3 together, th o, 
and repeat to the end of the row. 

Fourteenth roiv. — Purl. 

Next 2 rows like the last 2. 

Seventeenth roiv. — Purl. 

Eighteenth row. — Knit plain. 



Nineteenth and Twentieth rows. — Purl. 

Twenty-first row. — Knit plain. 

Repeat twice more beginning with the nine- 
teenth row. This completes the edge pattern and 
brings you to the fancy pattern. 

First row. — Purl 3, k 1, * p 5, k 1, and repeat 
from * across the raw. Knit back plain. 

Third row. — Purl 2, * k 3, p 3 and repeat from * 
across the row. Knit back plain. 

Fifth row. — Purl 1, k 5; repeat across the row. 
Knit back plain. This completes one section of 
the design. 

Seventh row. — Knit 1, purl 5 and repeat across 
the row. Knit back plain. 

Ninth row. — Knit 2 * purl 3, knit 3 and repeat 
from * across the row. Knit back plain. 

Eleventh row. — Knit 3, * purl 1, knit 5 and re- 
peat from * across the row. Knit back plain. 
This completes the second section of the design. 
Repeat these two sections until there 7 of them in 
all. Then repeat the edge pattern, knitting it so 
as to correspond with the one at the other side of 
the fancy pattern. In completing these side stripes 
they may be sloped off in knitting them, or they 
may be finished squarely and turned under when 
the case is being made. When all the stripes are 
knitted, join them together in the order seen in 
the engraving at No. 10, and doubling the sides 
together for 12^ inches, join them by an over- 
and-over stitch. This will leave a lap 4 or 5 
inches long to fold over the opening of the case. 
Next crochet a row of cross-trebles around the 
outer edges of the case, to provide openings for 
the insertion of ribbon. 

Then add the border to the edges and along 
the center stripe, crocheting it as represented by 
No. 11. If preferred, a knitted edging may be used 
in place of the one illustrated. 

In lining the case, color may be laid under the 
middle stripe only. 

Knitted Afghan. 

(No Illustration.) 

A knitted, striped afghan may be made in three 
colors — dark-red, pale-blue and tan color being 
pretty shades to select for the stripes — and consist 
of five stripes which include three patterns. Each 
stripe should be about a-quarter of a yard wide and 
should be knitted of Germantown wool on coarse 
steel, wooden or ivory needles. 

Center Stripe. 

The center stripe is made of dark-red by the 
design illustrated at No. 8, on page 21, and is 
knitted according to the directions also found 
on page 21. 

Remaining Stripes. 

For the stripe at each side of the middle stripe, 
knit as follows: 

Cast on 50 stitches with the blue yarn. Knit 
across and purl back, repeating in this order the 
whole length of the stripe. This will make a right 
and wrong side the same as ir> a stocking. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



151 



For each outer stripe knit as follows: 

Cast on 50 stitches of tan-colored yarn and knit 
across plain. 

First row. — Purl 1 and knit 1 out of every stitch. 

Second row. — * Slip 1, knit 1, pass slipped stitch 
over and repeat from * across the row. 

Repeat these two rows until the stripe is as long 
as required. 



* On that side where hangs the thread with 
which you work, take the side chain of the 7 
selvedge stitches of the part you have just knitted, 
on a separate needle, and knit another block, 
which must have 15 rows, and the 1st row of 
which is knitted. Repeat 10 times more from *. 
The stitches of several parts can be taken on the 
same needle, so as not to be hindered, in working, 



Then crochet the stripes together in cable-cord by too many needles. A reference to the engrav- 



style with black and yellow, 
after the following method: 

Catch one color at a cor- 
ner of the work and make 
a chain of 3; slip the hook 
out, fasten the other color 
in the next stitch and make 
another chain of 3, and also 
slip the hook out; now fas- 
ten the first chain with a 
single crochet in the 3rd 
stitch, and crochet another 
chain of 3; slip the hook 
out and fasten the chain of 
the other color in the 4th 
stitch and make another 
chain of 3; then fasten the 
last chain of the first color 
in the next stitch, and re- 
peat these details, always 
keeping the unfastened 
chains in front of the hook. 

Finish the edges with a 
crocheted border made of 
black and edged with yel- 
low, making 5 rows of shells 
with the black wool, with 6 
double crochets in each 
shell, and each shell made 
in the middle of the shell 
underneath. Then take the 
yellow wool, fasten it in the 
corner of a shell, and make 
chains of 3 caught with sin- 
gle crochets in every other 
stitch of the shell; next 
make similar chains down 
the sides of the shells and 
back again, catching them 
around the stitches in the 
spaces between the shells. 
Repeat these details around 
all the shells. 

Knitted Purse. 




No. 14. — Knitted Purse 



No. 14. — The purse 
shown at No. 14 requires 

black and red purse silk, jet beads, a steel clasp 
with chain, and 5 steel needles in making it. Begin 
the purse with the black silk in the center of the 
bottom part, and cast on for one block 7 stitches. 
K 14 rows on these back and forth in such a 
manner that the work is knitted on one side and 
purled on the other. The 1st stitch of every row 
is slipped and the 1st row of the block is purled. 



ing will make clear to the 
knitter how the stitches are 
taken up so that the rows 
of every 2 blocks will run 
at right angles with each 
other. 

When the 12 th block is 
completed, take the selvedge 
stitches on the left-hand 
needle on another needle, 
cast them off together with 
the cast-on stitches of the 
1 st block, and fasten the 
silk. Then take the 7 
right-hand selvedge 
stitches of one black block 
on a needle; take the red 
silk on which the beads 
have been strung, and work 
15 rows on these stitches, 
working the 1st row from 
the wrong side, and there- 
fore purled. In the 1st, as 
well as in all the other 
purled rows, the last stitch 
must be purled together 
with the next stitch of the 
next black block. 

In the purled rows, more- 
over, excepting in the first 
and last ones, a bead must 
be worked in after casting 
off the 2nd, 4th and 6th 
stitches. The stitch must 
be worked by inserting the 
needle into the back part, 
and in drawing through the 
silk which has been thrown 
forward, let the bead slide 
through stitch so that it is 
on the right side of the work. 
In the following knitted 
row, the needle must also be 
inserted into the back part 
of the bead stitch. When 
12 such red blocks have 
been completed, work again 
12 black blocks on the selvedge stitches of the 
same, in which the beads are not knitted in, but 
sewn afterwards, when the purse is completed. 
Then work 3 times more alternately, 12 red and 
12 black blocks. When the last 12 black blocks 
have been completed, cast off the stitches of the 
last black block together with the selvedge stitches, 
the 1st on the wrong side; the stitches of the 6th 



152 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



part are cast off in the same manner, together with 
the selvedge stitches of the 7th part. 

The red blocks which remain to be worked on 





16. — Knitted Blck 



No. 15.— Knitted Cloth for Polishing Floors. 

the black blocks are thus lessened by 2; the 2nd, 
3rd, 4th, 7th, 8th and 9th of these blocks must be 
6 rows longer. Then gather all of the stitches and 
selvedge stitches of the 10 parts on 
2 needles, in such a manner that the 

2 black blocks, the stitches and 
selvedge stitches of which have 
been cast off together, are placed on 
the sides of the purse, and knit off 
as follows with black, first on the 
stitches of the one needle, and then 
on those of the other: 

1 row knitted, knitting together 
every 3rd and 4th stitch; then work 

3 rows back and forward on the 
same number of stitches, which 
must be knitted on the right side; 
then work 8 rows more in the same 
manner, casting off the first 2 stitches 
of the 8 rows. Then cast off all the 
remaining stitches, sew the beads on 

the black parts from the illustration, also the clasp 
and bead tassel. 

Knitted Cloth for Polishing Floors. 

No. 15. — This cloth is made of unbleached wick 
cotton (see picture) and is knitted back and forth 
on very large wooden needles. About 90 stitches 
are cast on by the " First Method " (see page 7). 
Knit 60 of these stitches, then slip the rest off the 
needle and pull them into a chain for the loop. 
In knitting back, pick up the end of the chain and 
knit it off with the first stitch to form the loop. 
Knit until the article is square in shape and then 
bind off. Dusters may be knitted of the cotton illus- 
trated by splitting it. A ball of cotton will knit a 
polishing cloth about 20 inches square. 

Knitted Blue-Bag. 

No. 16. — The materials required are Scotch wool, 
and four needles, No. 16. 

The bag is commenced at the top; cast 148 stitches 
on 3 needles — that is, 49 on 2 needles, and 50 on 1. 

First round. — Purl. 



Second to Eleventh rounds. — Knit 1, purl 1, alter- 
nately, all round. 

Twelfth to Fiftee?ith rounds. — Purl. 

Sixteenth to Twentieth rounds. — 
Knit. 

Twenty-first round. — Th o, knit 
2 together throughout the round. 

Twenty-second to Twenty -sixth 
rounds. — Knit. 

Twenty-seventh to Thirtieth rounds. 
—Purl. 

Thirty-first to Thirty-fourth rounds. 
— Knit 1, purl 1 throughout. 

Thirty-fifth to Thirty-ninth rounds. 
— Purl 1, knit 1 throughout. 

Continue to repeat these last 4 
rounds alternately, 4 times through- 
out the work. In each alternate 
round decrease by knitting 2 stitches 
together at the beginning of each 
(4 rounds form a pattern.) In the fifth pat- 
tern, knit 3 stitches together at the beginning of 
each needle in the last round. Repeat the alternate 
4 rows 5 times more without de- 
crease, to give the bag a better shape. 
You now, in the next pattern, knit 2 
stitches together at the beginning 
and end of each needle in all 4 rows. 
In the next 4 rows, decrease the same. 
In the next 4 rows, knit 3 stitches 
together at the beginning of each 
needle. Now knit 4 rows, decreas- 
ing in each rcw until no stitches are 
left. A cord of chain-crochet is run 
through the 
holes at the 
top of the 
bag and its 
ends are 
completed 
with full 
tassels of the same wool. 



needle. 



Knitted Coffee Strainer. 

No. 17. — This strainer is 
made of knitting cotton. 

Cast 124 stitches on three 
needles — that is, 41 on 2 
needles and 42 on the other. 

First to Tenth rounds. — 
Knit. 

Eleventh round. — M 1, k 
2 together; repeat. 

Twelfth to Twe?ity-seco)id 
rounds. — Knit. 

To shape the strainer, 
knit as for the toe of a 
stocking — that is, knit 2 
together at the end of each 

needle in every 4th round, until there are no 
stitches left. Turn the top of the strainer down 
to the nth row to form the hem, and sew it to 
the metal ring which fits the top of the coffee pot. 




No. 17, 



-Knitted Coffee- 
Strainer. 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



153 



No. 18.- 



Knitted Towel. 
This towel may be knitted Avith white 




No. 18. — Knitted Towel. 

or unbleached braid or with No. 2 knitting cotton, 
which is as thick as fleecy wool. Use No. 3 
needles. 

Cast on 43 stitches, 
knit back and forth for 
42 rows, and then cast off. 

The loop may be cro- 
chetedbefore the stitches 
are cast on, the last stitch 
of the loop being slipped 
upon the needle as the 
first knitting stitch; and 
when knitting back the 
end of the loop may be 
taken up and knitted in 
the next time across. Or, 
a long piece of the cot- 
ton may be left at the beginning of the casting-on, 
and the loop crocheted from it afterward and fas- 
tened with a large needle. Either method is better 
than a loop made separately and sewed on. The 
towel may be made as large or as small as de- 
sired, according to the number of stitches cast on. 

Knitted Egg Holder. 

No. 19. — This is a useful article for keeping 
boiled eggs warm, and is made of a pretty shade of 
Berlin wool as follows : 

Cast 81 stitches onto a No. 15 knitting needle. 

First row. — K 3 and p 3 alternately. 

Second row. — P 3 and k 3 alternately. 

Third and Fourth rows. — Like 1st row. 

Fifth row. — Like 2nd row. 

Sixth row. — Like 1st row ; then repeat from the 




No. 19.— Knitted Egs Holder. 



first row. This forms a basket pattern. Knit in 
this manner until you have the foundation the 
length required. 

There are 6 pockets. For each cast on 28 
stitches ; decrease in every 3rd row by knitting 2 
together at the end. Work as follows : 

First row. — Knit. 

Second row. — Purl. 

Third row. — Knit. 

Fourth row. — Purl. 

Fifth and Sixth rows. — Knit. Repeat from 1st 
row until no stitches remain. 

Crochet an edge around the foundation and each 
pocket as follows : * 1 double crochet into a stitch, 
4 chain, 1 treble into the 1st chain stitch, skip 2 
stitches and repeat from *. 

Sew the pockets on as seen in the engraving, 
with a needle and some of the wool. 

Friction Mitten. 

No. 20. — At No. 20 is seen a friction mitten — 

a commendable article to use after a bath or, 

indeed, at any time to promote the circulation of 

the blood. It is easily made as follows: 

Use fine twine or cord for the foundation and 

hemp packing-twine for the rough outside surface. 

Knit it in two halves, and sew them together with 

an over-and-over stitch. 

Use steel needles, and cast on 30 stitches. Knit 

back and forth 80 rows of plain knitting, but in 

every second row knit the coarse twine in loops, 

which are cut open after the mitten is finished. 

The loops are made thus: 
Slip the first stitch, 
and before knitting the 
next stitch, lay the thick 
twine across the work- 
ing thread; * knit a 
stitch with the fine twine; 
bring the coarse twine 
from the front to the 
back across the stitch 
just knitted, and over 
the working thread; knit 
a stitch with the fine 
twine; carry the thick 
twine around a mesh or 

rod an inch in circumference which is to be held at 

the back of 

the work, 

and then 

bring it to 

the front 

before the 

next stitch; 

repeat from 

*. In the 

last 26 of 

the 80 rows, 

narrow 1 

stitch at 

both ends 

of every plain row. The edge is finished with a 

chain crocheted with red cotton and sewed on. 




No. 20. — Friction Mitten. 



V64 



THE ART OF KNITTING. 



Knitted Purse. 

No. 21. — This purse is made of knitting silk, and 

worked in rounds 
with four needles. 

Cast on 64 stitch- 
es, that is 22 on 
each of two needles 
and 20 on the third 
needle. 

First round. — ■ 
Purl. 

Knit for 2K 
inches. 

Now commence 
the decrease as fol- 
lows: 

First Round. — K 
4, si 1, k 1, pass the 
slipped stitch over. 
Repeat three times 
more. 

Second to Fourth 
rounds. — Knit with- 
out decrease, 

Fifth round. — K4, 
si 1, k 1, pass the slip- 
ped stitch over, k 9. 




only 4 stitches remaining. Take a coarse needle, 
thread it with silk, and draw the remaining 4 
stitches together. 

The top is finished by a narrow crocheted edge 
made as follows: 1 double into a stitch; 4 chain, 
skip 2 stitches, 1 double into the next. Repeat 
all round. Lengths of fine cord or of knitting silk 
are run through the work about 1 inch from the top, 
the ends of which are drawn from the inside of the 
purse. They are finished by being tightly knotted 
together at the ends to form small tassels. A ring 
of gilt or steel is slipped over the top. 

How to Make Balls for the Ends of 
Cords. 

Nos. 22, 23 and 24. — Cut from card-board a 
circular piece about one inch in diameter, and 
make a large hole in the center (see No. 22); run 
the worsted in and out through the hole, about the 
solid portion of the section, as shown by the 
picture, until the section is thickly and uniformly 
covered. Then run a thread of the worsted under 
the worsted on the section, as shown by No. 23, 
being careful to put the needle back in the place 
where it comes through till the thread comes out 
at the starting point; then cut the worsted all around 
the edge of the section, and tie the thread run 
round the hole as tightly as possible. The manner 



Sixth to Eighth rounds.- 



-Knit. 
, pass 



Ninth round. — K 4, si 1, 
the slipped stitch over, k 8. 

Te?ith to Tivelfth rounds. — Knit. 

Thirteenth round. — K 4, si 1, k 1, 
pass the slipped stitch over, k 7. 
Repeat. 

Fourteenth and Fifteenth rounds. — 
Knit. 

Sixteenth round. — K4, si 1, k 1, pass 
the slipped stitch over, k 6. Repeat. 

Seventeenth and Eighteenth rounds. 
— Knit. 

Nineteenth round. — K4, si 1, k 1, pass the slipped 
sticch over, k 5. Repeat. 

Twentieth and Twenty-first rounds. — Knit. 

Twenty-second round. — K 4, si 1, k 1, pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit 4. Repeat. 

Twenty-third round. — Kni t. 

Twenty-fourth round. — K 4, si 1, k 1, pass the 
slipped stitch over, k 3. Repeat. 

Twenty-fifth round. — Knit. 

Twenty-sixth round. — K 4, si 1, k 1, pass the 
slipped stitch over, k 2. Repeat. 

Twenty-seventh round. — Knit. 

Twenty-eighth round. — K 4, si 1, k 1, pass the 
slipped stitch over, k 1. Repeat. 

Tiventy-ninth round. — Knit. 

Thirtieth round. — K 4, si 1, k 1, pass the slipped 
stitch over. Repeat. 

Thirty-first round. — * K 4, si 1, k 1, pass the 
slipped stitch over. R.epeat from * three times. 

After this, decrease in each round by knitting 1 
stitch less between the decreasings, until there are 




No. 22. 



No. 23. 



of tving the thread when 
the worsted is cut is shown 
at No. 24. After cutting 
the worsted pull it through 
the hole, clip the threads 
evenly and closely with 
sharp scissors, and roll the 
ball between the palms of 
the hands to shape it; 
then shake it well. 

The balls may be made 
any size desired by increas- 
ing or decreasing the size 
of the card-board section. 

Another method is as 
follows: Cut the wool 
into lengths of an inch 

and a-half; take a bunch twice the thickness of a 
full skein of the wool for each ball, and tie it very 
tightly through the middle with twine; then with 
the scissors clip it into shape and sew to a cord. 




No. 24. 
23 and 24— De- 



Xos. 22 

tails fob Making 

for the Ends of 



Balls 
Cords. 




eedfe^wraft: 



ARTISTIC an° PRACTICAL. 



In the Second, Revised, Edition, will be found 
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that should be in the possession of every Lady 
who devotes any of her time to Needle-Work. 

PRICE, 4s. or $I.OO PER COPY. 

't'HE Book is replete with accurate Engravings of Decora- 
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In this Volume will be found innumerable Artistic 
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The instructions are clear and comprehensive, and fully 



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for ihe Various Kinds of Crochet- Work mentioned. 

The Book also contains many valuable Hints and Suggestions as to various 
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flit of Jlieni Lace-piatiDi. 

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A Beautiful Manual of this Fascinating Art, bearing the above Title 
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Designs, together with Full Instructions for the work, from the Primary 
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While the Methods and Details given are entirely modern 
and include none of the laborious work required in making the 
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The Collection Includes Needle-Point, Honiton, Princess 
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x# 


: ■ 1 


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The Book includes Engravings of Spanish, 
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With the above are also included Twelve 
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displaying between Two and Three Hundred Illustrations of Historical. Legendary, Tradi- 
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Arranging Amateur, School and Church Entertainments, and should be ordered at once. 
Manv varieties of Fancy-Dress Entertainments are suggested, Tableaux, Rnls Maique, 

Carnival Ses- 
i ■,._-_- sions. and Fash- 

ionable Fancy- 
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r j described. 

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A/fl etro|*of itan (+ \,utture *^ertes* 



OOD MANNERS X This Book explains in extremely inter- 

esting fashion the most approved 

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QOCIAL LIFE : This Book sets forth in the form of a friendly 

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be fully instructed. It also contains an Appendix of Approved 
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fully with the rules laid down in "Good Manners" will find how 
they may be applied in " Social Life." 




JJOME-MAKING AND HOUSE-KEEPING 



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Hand- 

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equally valuable to prospective brides, youthful housekeepers and those whom experience has versed 
in economic and methodical home-making and house-keeping. 

HTHE PATTERN COOK BOOK: This is a complete, practical and reliable work on the Cul- 

~ inary Science : embracing the Chemistry of Food ; the 

Furnishing of the Kitchen ; how to choose good Food ; a choice selection of Standard Recipes ; Meats, 
Vegetables, Bread, Cakes, Pies, Desserts ; Proper Food for the Sick ; Items of Interest in the 
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DEAUTY, ITS ATTAINMENT AND PRESERVATION : No effort has been spared 

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fie y| etr o|io f item p Wtij ilttet ^eries t 

g MOCKING AND FANCY STITCHES FOR 

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—3«»l€— 



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V 



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SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION LIBRARIES 

.Hmnmin 

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